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Creative Excellence in the Japanese University: Knowledge Content Cognition and Language Culture Communication Integrated Global Awareness Learning

Creative Excellence in the Japanese University: Knowledge Content Cognition and Language Culture Communication Integrated Global Awareness Learning

Barnett (1997) argues that the university has lost its way, but that the world needs the university more than before but for different reasons. He says that the university must clarify a new role in the world and in society, and find a new vocabulary, and a new sense of purpose. The world in- cluding the university is faced with what Barnett calls supercomplexity where human frames of understanding, action, and identity are continually changing and being challenged. In this new supercomplex world, the university, Barnett maintains, must take on two roles in particular. Firstly, it needs to compound supercomplexity, thus making the world more challenging than it has seemed. The second role is to enable humans to live effectively in this chaotic world. Internally, says Barnett, the university needs to become a new kind of organization that must, whether it likes it or not, live with uncertainty (i.e. “the uncertainty principle”) and at the same time help people to live with and revel in that uncertainty. Creativity, excellence, and excellence in creativity are also uncertain in this new supercomplex world which requires new and innovative ways of framing their interpretations and development in higher education. We focus in this paper on the potential of additional L2 global language English to serve as the medium of effecting an integrated content-knowledge-cognition and language-culture-communication creatively excellent higher edu- cation. However, it is our belief and hope that such a higher learning can and should be developed in the L1 Japanese language as the primary medium of learning and communication. The employ- ment and deployment of CLIGAL in the home L1 Japanese and the globally useful L2 English are necessary for there to be creative excellence across the Japanese higher education curriculum.
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Language learning and language culture in a changing world

Language learning and language culture in a changing world

Teaching L2/FL practical cultural skills The very purpose of teaching L2/FL cultural and pragmatic interactional norms is to enable learners to communicate effectively. In consequence, the teaching of practical language competencies has to develop learners' cross-cultural awareness, at the very least. In addition, however, instruction in functional pragmatic skills needs to extend beyond cultural appreciation of, for example, literature and the arts to building realistic and usable intercultural abilities (Scarino, 2010). It is hard to imagine that the effective teaching of incremental language skills, such as speaking or listening, intended for functional communication can take place in isolation from instruction in L2/FL culture. A good analogy in this case may be learning basic math skills: knowing math rules would not be helpful at all if a learner cannot compute such small daily necessities as car fuel efficiency per liter, currency conversions in shops in another country, or the taxi fare required to reach a particular destination. The knowledge about specific cultural attributes of a community does not necessarily enable to learners' to communicate effectively in social, educational, and professional interactions where both linguistic and pragmatic skills have to be deployed (Hinkel, 2001).
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THE INFLUENCE OF MASTERING TARGET-LANGUAGE CULTURE ON THE STUDENTS’ LANGUAGE SKILLS

THE INFLUENCE OF MASTERING TARGET-LANGUAGE CULTURE ON THE STUDENTS’ LANGUAGE SKILLS

Mastering language skills cannot be separated from mastering the context of the language since someone who is only mastering the language without mastering the context and philosophy of the language is “a fluent fool” (Choudhury (2013). The context is created from the habits in the culture where the language exists. It is widely known that there are many branches of language such as sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, pragmatics, and many others. The mentioned branches have its own focus on how to dig the linguistics fields deeply; some fields might be related to the social contexts, while some others might be related to the personal contexts. The whole branches lead to one purpose which is facilitating the smooth and the clear communication since language is what the membersof a particular society speak (Wardhaugh, 2006:1). Therefore, one of the ways to master the language in practical context is mastering its culture about how and when to use language contextually.
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Deaf Culture & Sign Language Recognition

Deaf Culture & Sign Language Recognition

The current system has been used in a wide variety of real-world applications[5], Including digital prototype evaluation, virtual reality biomechanics, and animation. It is constructed with stretch fabric for comfort and a mesh palm for ventilation. Sometimes the sensors are attached to finger tips. In this sign language recognition system the gesture is captured without wearing sensitive hand gloves or sensors.

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Bootstrapping communication in language games

Bootstrapping communication in language games

A possible approach to the understanding of language self-organization is that of modeling artificial population of agents and studying their evolution. The choice is then between endowing agents with simple properties, so that one can hope to fully understand what happens in simulations, or with more complicated and realistic structures that yet risk to confuse experiments outputs. We choose to follow the first possibility since we are more interested in the global behavior of the population. In this perspective we do not seek answers to specific issues in the evolution of language, but rather we aim at analyzing deeply basic models that can constitute valuable starting points for more sophisticated investigations. Nevertheless, as we shall see, also extremely transparent agents and interaction rules can give rise to very complex and rich global behaviors and the study of simple models can help to shed light on general properties - a well known lesson in statistical physics.
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INFORMATION AND LANGUAGE FOR EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION

INFORMATION AND LANGUAGE FOR EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION

We cannot give what we do not have. What we have had during input exposure is the information we can give during output exposure. The output exposure is the essential result of input exposure. In ILEC oral communicative activities, the information to discuss to/with the class is the result of the inten- sive and extensive independent exposure of the language learner. The role of the language learners follows the so called sponge principle wherein it regards learners as sponges who soak up knowledge through in-depth immersion in contextual reading, observing, listening, watching, recollecting, etc., on a common subject, then pool the information he absorbed in class, or with a group, or with his teacher for discussion (Parrott, 1993). The learner has some- thing to discuss because he has information that he fully understands. He can negotiate meaning, he can respond to feedbacks, he can ask questions to clarify whether the listeners understand him or not. In other words, the information that the learner has and his maximum comprehension of it sets up his confi- dence to speak up.
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Natural Language Communication with Robots

Natural Language Communication with Robots

We propose a framework for devising empiri- cally testable algorithms for bridging the com- munication gap between humans and robots. We instantiate our framework in the context of a problem setting in which humans give instructions to robots using unrestricted natu- ral language commands, with instruction se- quences being subservient to building com- plex goal configurations in a blocks world. We show how one can collect meaningful training data and we propose three neural architectures for interpreting contextually grounded natural language commands. The proposed architec- tures allow us to correctly understand/ground the blocks that the robot should move when instructed by a human who uses unrestricted language. The architectures have more diffi- culty in correctly understanding/grounding the spatial relations required to place blocks cor- rectly, especially when the blocks are not eas- ily identifiable.
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Speech, Language and Communication Difficulties

Speech, Language and Communication Difficulties

further problems. When a young person with SLCN comes across those in authority, such as under questioning at a police station, or attendance at court, their SLCN can cause them to present in ways that increase their risk of criminalisation (Hughes et al., 2012). For example, young people may respond with monosyllabic answers (Snow and Powell, 2011), or be unable to make eye contact, or present a coherent narrative about the events in question (Snow and Powell, 2012). In addition they may not understand the court process enough to be able to successfully participate (RCSLT, 2012; Talbot, 2010). It is therefore of no surprise that an online survey of 208 Youth Offending Team staff in England and Wales revealed that their perception was that young people with SLCN were more likely to receive a custodial sentence than those without such needs (Talbot, 2010), or that 70% of young offenders in Polmont YOI were identified in 2003 as having significant communication problems (Polmont, 2003, cited in: RCSLT, 2010).
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English As A Language Of International Communication

English As A Language Of International Communication

In fact, in 90 countries around the world, English is either widely studied, or is a second language. In the administrative district of the People's Republic of Hong Kong, students in nine out of ten secondary schools study English. In France, students in public secondary schools are required to study German or English for four years, and most - at least 85% - choose English. Students in Japan must study English before graduating from high school for six years. In some countries, learning foreign languages for children is necessary, for example, in Russia, where most people choose English. In Sweden, Norway, and Denmark, children are also required to learn English. Not taking into account the UK, from all European countries, Holland ranks first in the number of people who know English. An interesting fact is that for some time since Portugal joined the European Community, the demand for English lessons exceeded and even replaced the demand for French lessons. “Teachers, young professionals, students, government officials, and business people in most countries are experiencing a general shortage of materials and technology in English,” says Charles Wick, former director of the United States News Agency. The agency promotes English language courses in more than 100 countries in 200 cultural centers. USIA sponsored English classes for 450 thousand people. [9, p. 95]
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Culture of Communication and Honor Human Relationships

Culture of Communication and Honor Human Relationships

communicate with culture, meaning, that is something quite and reliable, without any consequence or other background, because his conscience will hardly permit, to play and to completes character and its value. When this communication meets all these conditions, also no doubt that the relations will be credible and concrete are based on qualitative performance and the successful guaranteed. As noted above, it is an essential factor in all fields such as economics for various businesses, politics, education, etc., is the culture of communication, and relationships relationship, or national cross a certain area and the emphasis on joint development and mutual areas mentioned above. Culture Communication is undoubtedly a genuine transparency of an objective economic, political, which aims, forms as good and successful as a performance guarantee and sincere communication social right, as a condition essential for relationships between and among human no doubt, that will also affect international and contemporary. These are undoubtedly well as essential factors of economic development of other communities, but also advance the development of standards that reflect positively on job opening, on the one hand and the establishment of more demanding, more advanced cost of living as principle. So to own such a culture, which aims cooperation between communities, for communication between honest, with a party who possesses great experience and successful, has a great significance abroad
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The Language and Culture of a Dream: A Case Study

The Language and Culture of a Dream: A Case Study

One of Gilman’s “issue plays” is Blue Surge (2001). It discusses issues of culture and social classes, the American Dream, and prostitution (Smith, 2008). It is the story of Sandy, a young prostitute, and Heather who work under the title of being masseuses and bond with policemen named Curt and Doug who, respectively, wanted to arrest Sandy and Heather, at the beginning of the play. Beth is Curt’s upper- middle-class girlfriend, who reprimands him of not trying hard to get a raise at his job. All in all, Curt sees himself as a follower of his dreams as well as Sandy, who is now her own boss and does not have to pay commission to a pimp. They are trapped in living the American Dream, which has been set for them, and they are going to achieve it regardless of the means, no matter how hard the road gets.
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INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION, THE BASIS OF THE ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE

INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION, THE BASIS OF THE ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE

INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION, THE BASIS OF THE ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE Bodea, Gabriela and Mustata, Razvan V.. Babes-Bolyai University, Babes-Bolyai University.[r]

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Aphasia in Taishan Culture Worldwide Communication

Aphasia in Taishan Culture Worldwide Communication

Secondly, the discussion of “who” is about the communicator, who look into the factors that initiate and guide the act of communication (Zhou, 2015b) 6 . This subdivision field is called research control analysis. In Taishan culture worldwide communication, communicator includes governmental departments, research institutions, cultural experts and scholars, guides, Taishan culture lovers and all kinds of common people etc. They are direct in connecting and understanding Taishan culture and form the main and various body of Taishan culture com- munication. As the communicators are different in social status or knowledgeable backgrounds, they differen- tiate in understanding Taishan culture, which is one of the important reasons in arousing Aphasia. Take Shigan- dang culture for example, people have different understandings even misunderstandings in studying and ex- pressing this particular Taishan cultural belief. The ordinary people think that Shigandang is something about stones, knowing nothing about its culture or stories; the experts and scholars’ research and study show that Shi- gandang is a typical belief in Taishan and has a rich and profound cultural history, being unable to transmit this understanding to the ordinary people. Thus there exists a gap between academic field and common field, which arouses cultural Aphasia. Another instance is Bixiayuanjun belief in the populace’s understanding and in the academic study. The mass people know that Bixiayuanjun is the most holy and sacred Taishan host called Lao- nainai (meaning the senior Grandmother) whose birthday was on lunar moth March 15th. However, the title has undergone variations of “Taishan maid-Taishan niangniang-Taishan nainai-Taishan laonainai 7 ” in the academic studies, and people’s belief on her has also undergone the development from the officials to the masses, and still more, her birthday has undergone the change from lunar month April 18th to March 15th (Zhou, 2015a) 8 . The Aphasia caused by different understandings and gaps among communicators will influence the communication quality and arouse misunderstandings or misapprehensions to the world.
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Saurashtra: A Language, Region, Culture & Community

Saurashtra: A Language, Region, Culture & Community

If one study the linguistic, literary and cultural tradition of the Saurashtrians in South India, it is found, to a certain extent, very obviously, the Marathi, Kannada, Tamil and Telugu influence, external as well as internal, in its formation. If we can isolate this influence, it is probable that a study of the residual material will throw a new light on the language, literature and culture of Saurashtra as it existed eight hundred years ago. The English colonists who have migrated to Iceland and other islands have preserved in a pure form some special characteristics of the old English language such as old pronunciations and typical form of the old English language. This has supplied some important material for tracing the evolution of the English language. Similarly the study of the Southern Saurashtri language can supply some important material pertaining to the old language of Saurashtra and Gujarat. The Parsis who have migrated from Persia to Gujarat have adopted the Gujarati language almost as the mother tongue, and they have not continued the usage of their original language even in their intra group communication. But the Southern Saurashtrians have preserved very strongly their original linguistic traditions. Their pride of being Saurashtrians and their insistence on being called Saurashtrians are very strong. They had lost the geographical idea of their original homeland Saurashtra.
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Music: Its Language, History, and Culture

Music: Its Language, History, and Culture

In the 1930s, New York City became the center of jazz activity, as it has remained to the present day. In addition, partly because of the huge demand for dance music (the country was in the midst of the Depression and dance—along with movies—provided escape from the dismal realities of daily life) and the sizeable venues into which jazz musicians were booked, jazz bands became larger, often with entire sections of reed and brass instruments. In addition, the saxophone—considered largely a joke instrument in the 1920s—emerged as the jazz instrument par excellence (perhaps because of its versatility and similarity to the human voice). This was the era of the jazz big band, and of groups such as those led by Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, and Count Basie. It was also the heyday of the jazz arranger, who took on the responsibility of laying out specific parts for members of the band (often in notation) as well as incorporating improvisation, for collective music-making was no longer feasible in a group of 15 or more musicians. Many of the era’s greatest soloists—saxophonists Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young, Johnny Hodges and Ben Webster, clarinetists Goodman and Artie Shaw, trumpeters Roy Eldridge, Red Allen and Cootie Williams (as well as Armstrong, of course)—played with these big bands. Big band jazz swept the nation, becoming the most popular type of dance music on the scene, and resulting in the creation of thousands of records. In addition, radio, which had begun to have an impact on American culture in the 1920s, exploded into one of the country’s most important media.
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Paleoanthropology of Consciousness, Culture and Oral Language

Paleoanthropology of Consciousness, Culture and Oral Language

It is presented an updated version of my previous paleoanthropological in- terpretation of the available utilitarian and non-utilitarian Paleolithic finds (Messori 2016), aimed at establishing the earliest human developmental stag- es of consciousness, culture and oral language. The environmental transfor- mations to which Earth has gone to meet from its formation to the Archean period of the Precambrian Era, during which the terrestrial proto-biological phenomenon develops, are briefly discussed. By following the quantum elec- trodynamic explanation of biological water it is assumed that the transition from organic to biological it would have happened during late Hadean with the formation of colloid lyophilized bubbles , dissipative systems embedded by anticipatory systems , at the phase boundary between chaotic and ordered (coherent) regimes, composed by perturbed prebiotic water maintained in a regime of oscillatory super-coherence by an endogenous electromagnetic field of suitable intensity and frequency, bounded by a selective electronic pump consisting of a semi-crystalline film of reducing water , and containing ma- cromolecules such as proteins and amino acids, synthesized on a enantiose- lective basis. A brief recapitulation of the geological phases and biological events that characterized the ca. 1.5 billion years that stand between eukaryo- tic cells stabilization and genus Homo appearance is provided. By adopting a non-Darwinian approach, the biological phenomenon is described as an eco-systemic non-linear dissipative system embedded by super-complex an- ticipatory systems, at the phase boundary between chaotic and ordered (co- herent) regimes, ruled by thermodynamics of non-equilibrium laws. By comparing utilitarian and non-utilitarian finds dating from Lower Paleolithic (ca. 2.7 - 2.4 mya to ca. 300 - 120 tya) with finds dating from Middle Paleo- lithic (ca. 300 - 120 to ca. 45 - 30 tya), it is assumed that the inner life (in- sight) of our distant ancestors underwent a slow process of psycho-relational and psycho-biological individuation (incubation and settling of a distinct and relatively autonomous neuro-psychological identity ), that only recently (second half of Lower Paleolithic) led to the formation of the relatively autonomous How to cite this paper: Messori, C. (2019)
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The Language and Communication Characteristics of Communication Aids - A Systematic Review

The Language and Communication Characteristics of Communication Aids - A Systematic Review

The work presented in this paper is part of the wider I-ASC research project [3] : “ Identifying appropriate symbol communication aids for children who are non- speaking - enhancing clinical decision-making ”. The main research aim of I -ASC is to develop processes for optimising decisions about the choice of symbol communication aids. These decisions are based on characteristics of the child, the family and their context, and characteristics of the symbol communication aid – but these characteristics, and how decisions are made based on these characteristics, are poorly understood.
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ENGLISH LANGUAGE EDUCATION   INTEGRATING CULTURE

ENGLISH LANGUAGE EDUCATION INTEGRATING CULTURE

Culture is basically in three salient categories of human activity. They are the personal, the collective and the expressive. As the individuals we think and function is personal, whereby we function in a social context is collective and the society expresses is expressive. The culture is build up on these three pillars. As cultures are brought increasingly into greater contact with one another, multicultural considerations are brought to bear to an ever increasing degree in English Language Education which paves a path to integrating culture. English language practitioners earlier emphasized on developing LSRW skills in order to develop learners‟ proficiency in English. In addition to these four skills, they added vocabulary and grammar components but ignored important component “Culture” In recent years language experts have recognized its importance in language teaching. For this reason, it has been termed as the fifth skill for language learners. The role of culture was over looked earlier by practitioners as language educators as language education was thought to be a process of mastering the linguistic codes. It was mostly confined to language skills plus vocabulary, grammar and punctuation. However, they have now realized its importance as language learning and teaching can‟t take place without contexts and cultures. Earlier, emphasis was on the culture associated with the target language. For instance, if one wants to learn Spanish one needs to learn some aspects of Spanish culture. Now, with the advent of learners‟ centered teaching, the focus has shifted to culture and contexts of the learner. This paper throws light on the place of culture in English language education and explores ways of integrating it in English language education through collaborative tasks and activities. English language practitioners earlier emphasized on developing four skills such as listening, speaking, reading and writing in order to develop learners‟ proficiency in English. It had been thought that if learners developed proficiency in these four skills then they could use the language effectively. In addition to these four skills, they added vocabulary
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The Role of Language in Intercultural Communication

The Role of Language in Intercultural Communication

The purpose of the current research was to probe the role of language in intercultural communication. The results show qualitative changes in the minds of young people in the learning process. The freshers were motivated to a greater extent. It is easily explained by the euphoria of “freshers’maximalism” when inspiration increases self-confidence. There are factors that reduce second years’ motivation: the difficulty of the subject, the need for regular classes. However, there is a significant change in the consciousness of graduates and, accordingly, an increase of the intrinsic motivation due to the identification with highly qualified specialists. Using advanced technologies provides an increase in the motivation level and, consequently, the result. Stable and actual features of professional skills (the ability to extract information on the speciality from foreign sources, and use it in the industrial activities, the ability to communicate and negotiate with potential colleagues, investors within professional boundaries; ability to plan education and establish links between forward-looking, strategic, tactical and operational objectives of education) can be motivating.
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LANGUAGE OF COMMUNICATION IN THE NIGERIAN MEDIA

LANGUAGE OF COMMUNICATION IN THE NIGERIAN MEDIA

Social media is also guilty of language misuse as it is practically not expose to any kind of control. Communicators on social media arbitrarily use language pleasing or appealing to them. Many indigenous languages have suffered in the hand of communicators who adulterate them in what can be described “free styling” with words. The art of texting which facilitates abridged of words worsened the understanding of language and how to write it appropriately. Some users are so engrossed in the text messaging art that they found it difficult to write correctly. United Kingdom’s Guardian newspaper cites 2010 English Spelling Society survey which traced mis-spelling and grammatical mistakes among UK children to web- based activities. People on social media care less about the socio-cultural and security implications of their choice of words hiding under the guise of anonymity. Many social network users post messages without taken into consideration their clarity and logic.
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