Latino Studies and Latin American Studies

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Occasional Paper No. 10 Latino Studies Series

Occasional Paper No. 10 Latino Studies Series

G a l a r z a ’s ghost therefore forces us to begin a discussion of how we position our work for an international, hemispheric public. We must consider the positive and negative ramifications of the movement of Chicano history away from the discipline of Latin American Studies, where most students were first trained in the late-1960s and early- 1970s, to its present position as a sub-field of United States history. Because they are increasingly taught by US-specialists, graduate students in Chicano history today probably know less about Latin A m e r i c a than those who entered the field in the 1960s and 1970s. As historians have struggled over the last thirty years to include ethnic Mexican people in the narratives of American history, there has been only sporadic discussion about how to continue working within the field of Latin American history. In this age of NAFTA, the field must assess how to work e ffectively in both American Studies and Latin American Studies, strategize about becoming an institutional bridge between departments and conferences in the two fields, and exchange more ideas with Mexican scholars interested in topics like colonialism, urbanization, class stratification, migration, race and representation, and politics. T h e s e e fforts will challenge the way most departments arrange themselves around national histories, and will certainly raise difficult questions about, among other things, the training of future graduate students. Faculty and students therefore face a challenging task in working both inside and outside the national historiographies of the United States and Mexico, but in doing so will likely reshape the field in the next decade. New studies comparing communities of ethnic Mexicans on both sides of the border will raise important questions about national exceptionalism, and reorient our understanding of how labor, culture, and capital have moved on a south-north axis.
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The struggle for chicano/latino studies. Evolution and development in California

The struggle for chicano/latino studies. Evolution and development in California

As Latino communities grew and diversified, the urgency for studies that represented and analyzed them was palpable as well as the schooling of younger generations (Cabán 2003, 8). During these years the Latino Studies covered, in their interior, different realities like Chicano, Puerto Rican and others Studies. This created internal confrontations between those who preferred to maintain their individuality, and external ones, among those who considered that the Departments of Latino Studies formed a self-imposed ghetto. However, internal and external problems did not prevent Latin American Studies, such as Chicanos and Puerto Ricans, from having an undeniable academic development during this period (Cabán 2003, 19). In the late 1980s at UC Los Angeles, the faculty committee considered that the undergraduate program in Chicano Studies had some shortcomings and suggested suspending the admission until being improved. Some students understood that a suspension could have led to the dismantling of the Studies. Since that fight, the students of the university began to request the creation of a Department. This caused the recognition from the media and a symbolic significance for the whole community. In 1993, this struggle became radicalized and students, along with professors, carried out a civil disobedience, finally achieving a commitment with the University for the development of a new academic unit and new professorships (Paredes 1991; Cabán 2003, 9,16-17,22; Flores 1997; I. García 1996).
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Librarian for Latin American and Caribbean Studies in U.S. Academic and Research Libraries

Librarian for Latin American and Caribbean Studies in U.S. Academic and Research Libraries

Summary and Conclusions A distillation of the job announcements yields a picture of the typical LACS librarian. In terms of educational back- ground, an MLS is standard and an advanced degree in a related subject field is highly desirable. Prior experience in an academic or research library, particularly in collection development, is sought by employers. Experience perform- ing reference and library instruction is also valued. General technology skills are commonly expected. Strong Spanish language abilities are required, and at least a working or reading knowledge of Portuguese is highly desirable. In today’s work environment, excellent communication skills are essential. Related traits such as interpersonal skills, the ability to work in teams, and a public service orientation are expected. In addition to performing collection development, the LACS librarian will be responsible for reference (both general and specialized), library instruction, and liaison with academic departments, programs, and centers. The LACS librarian also may be assigned additional subject responsi- bilities, including Iberian studies, Spanish and Portuguese language and literature, or U.S. Latino studies.
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Latin American Studies

Latin American Studies

Courses offered by the Interdisciplinary Program in Latin American Studies are listed under the subject code LATINAM on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site (https://explorecourses.stanford.edu). The Center for Latin American Studies (CLAS) supports research and teaching in all fields of study as they relate to Latin America. Academic programs encourage interdisciplinary approaches and draw on the expertise of nearly sixty active affiliated faculty members representing Stanford's various schools and departments. Stanford University Libraries' substantial Latin American collections are valuable resources for students, faculty, and visiting researchers alike. Each year CLAS hosts a number of Tinker Visiting Professors, highly distinguished Latin American and Iberian scholars who come to Stanford to teach a course in their field of specialization. The Center for Latin American Studies maintains a highly active public events calendar and provides funding to students and faculty for a variety of research, teaching, internship, and conference activities. Stanford offers three formal academic programs in Latin American Studies: an Undergraduate Minor, Interdisciplinary Honors, and a Master of Arts degree. The Center is a U.S. Department of Education Title VI National Resource Center for Latin America.
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POLISH ASSOCIATION FOR AMERICAN STUDIES

POLISH ASSOCIATION FOR AMERICAN STUDIES

Aneta Dybska, a doctoral student in the Section of Anglo-Saxon Cultures, spent the Summer Semester 2001/2002 on a Junior Research Grant at Kent State University, Ohio. She conducted research on black nationalism and masculinity, and attended classes at the Pan-African Studies Department. While at KSU, she participated in the National Model Organization of African Unity Conference, held in Washington, D.C., in March, 2002. The project carried out in Kent was preceded by research funded by a library grant at the John F. Kennedy Institute, Freie Universität, Berlin in August 2002.

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American Studies in the Prediction of Recidivism

American Studies in the Prediction of Recidivism

Hakeem compared predicted and actual parole behavior of 1,108 men from one of the branches of a state prison system during 1939 and 1940.27 The Burgess method was used to score offenders[r]

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American Studies – the Local and the Global

American Studies – the Local and the Global

The stemming of the field of American Studies happened all at once in the 1930s, one of the first interdisciplinary ar- eas of inquiry emerging out of crossings between history, literature, anthropology, culture, ethnic studies, pop culture, transnationalism and a range of perceptions often linked with social movements. The general historians were soon aware of sources of fresh and dynamic thought among their colleagues in economics, political science, and sociology, whereas literary historians found their interest in environ- mental goal, reflected among the historians of painting, sculpture, architecture. Both groups found the philosophers turning from the classical forms of their subject to pragma- tism and experimentalism and from traditional histories of pure philosophy to a type of intellectual history which was firmly anchored to the time, the place, the group, and the thinker (Spiller, 1960, p. 210). According Spiller’s point of view, the field helps to know economics, political science sociology, philosophy and even sculpture. Today such a list might be expanded to include disability studies, ethnic stud- ies, women’s studies, etc. at first glance it might seem like chaos, but there is also an order to things, unspoken rules. Considering the above-mentioned, we can conclude, that American Studies’ specificity encourages us to add, subtract and rearrange as we build our own curriculum depending on geography, time, and the mission of the program. All these factors are considered, while designing the program at home and internationally. Americans have an interest espe- cially how the United States is viewed and studied transna- tionally.
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American Journal of Medicine Studies

American Journal of Medicine Studies

Abstract Background: Glaucoma and hypertension are chronic debilitating illnesses with serious complications. Glaucoma is the commonest cause of irreversible blindness worldwide while hypertension is the commonest cause of cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality including sudden death. Very few papers have studied the association between these diseases in Nigeria. None of them however has been conducted in the South-Eastern part of the country. Objectives: The aim of this paper was to study the prevalence of hypertension in Glaucoma patients attending eye clinics in two tertiary hospitals in Enugu state, South-East Nigeria. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among glaucoma patients attending follow-up eye-clinics in two tertiary hospitals in Enugu state, Nigeria over a one-month period. Their blood pressures were measured using an automated blood pressure machine. Hypertension was defined as blood pressure greater than or equal to 140/90mmHg according to the British Hypertension Society classification of Hypertension. Results: 254 patients participated in the survey; 124 were males and 130 were females. Most participants, 91.7%, were aged 41 and above. More than three-quarters were educated up to at least primary school level. The prevalence of hypertension among the participants was 54.8%. Conclusion: We have described a simple prevalence of hypertension in glaucoma patients where slightly above half of the respondents were found to have elevated blood pressures at the time of questioning. Other studies have demonstrated a positive association between hypertension and glaucoma.
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American Journal of Medicine Studies

American Journal of Medicine Studies

Decreased vitamin D levels not only lead to obesity, but also increase the risk of metabolic abnormalities. The results showed that the prevalence of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperuricemia and hyperinsulinemia increased significantly in 25-(OH)D3 deficiency patients. At present, vitamin D is thought to affect blood pressure by regulating renin angiotensin system (RAS) [15]. Studies have shown that 25-(OH)D3 can be expressed in pancreatic β cells, which helps to maintain intracellular and extracellular calcium concentration, while insulin secretion is a calcium-dependent process [16,17]. In addition, there are vitamin D (VD) receptors on islet β cells. VD promotes insulin synthesis and secretion by binding vitamin D binding protein to VD receptor, And then affect the blood sugar concentration. Therefore, obese patients should dynamically monitor the level of 25-(OH)D3 in the process of weight loss and supplement vitamin D when necessary, so as to reduce the occurrence and development of metabolic diseases.
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A Critical Assessment of Japan’s Foreign Aid Sanctions Policy: Case Studies of Latin American Countries

A Critical Assessment of Japan’s Foreign Aid Sanctions Policy: Case Studies of Latin American Countries

Since the introduction of the new guidelines in 1991, Tokyo has reviewed foreign aid to nine African countries, i.e. Kenya (1991), Zaire (1991), Malawi (1992), Sudan (1992), Sierra Leone (1992), Togo (1993), Zambia (1993), Nigeria (1994), and the Gambia (1994) (see Furuoka, 2007). In Latin America, Japan used negative reinforcement in Haiti (1991) and Guatemala (1993). It is worth noting that, in the 1980s before the ODA Charter was promulgated, Japan had taken similar measures towards two Asian countries, i.e. Burma (1988) and China (1989) (Furuoka, 2006).

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The political role of evangelicalism in Latin American countries: case studies of Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua

The political role of evangelicalism in Latin American countries: case studies of Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua

Before analysing the relationship between religion and politics in Latin America, it is important to distinguish between different, although often overlapping concepts: Protestantism, Evangelicalism, Pentecostalism, Charismatic Christianity, the Third Wave and Fundamentalism. The broadest of these terms is Protestantism being the largest denomination within Christianity. The exact figure of Protestants in the world is contested but falls usually between 500 million and 800 million people (Johnson et al. 2017, 42). Evangelicalism 1 (also known as Evangelical Protestantism or Evangelical Christianity) is a subset within Protestantism that has distinct doctrines and practices (Freston 2008, 5). Evangelicalism is not a separate denomination but rather a joint definition for many different religious groups. Several researchers of Evangelical Protestantism ground their work on the “Bebbington quadrilateral”: four qualities characteristic to Evangelicalism formulated by the British historian David W. Bebbington. These features are activism (gospel needs to be globally spread), conversionism (people who are going to be baptized will spiritually be born again from the Holy Spirit), biblicism (believing that the Bible is the source of essential truth), and crucicentrism (special emphasis on the Christ’s sacrifice on the cross) (Bebbington 1989, 2).
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African-American Studies

African-American Studies

The Department of African American Studies offers a joint Bachelor of Arts in African-American Studies and Masters of Public Management. Sponsored by the Department and the School of Public Affairs, this special degree combines African-American history and culture with the study of public policy, analysis, and research. The program consists of 150 credits and you must meet the following criteria in order to apply:

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M.A. in Latin American Studies, Tropical Conservation and Development Program (TCD), University of Florida

M.A. in Latin American Studies, Tropical Conservation and Development Program (TCD), University of Florida

Education B.A. in Political Science, Dept. of Arms Control, Disarmament and International Security (ACDIS), University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign). Minor: American History. 1983. M.A. in Latin American Studies, Tropical Conservation and Development Program (TCD), University of Florida. 1999.

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American Journal of Medicine Studies

American Journal of Medicine Studies

Cite This Article: Akila BASSOWA, Ayoko KETEVI, Baguilane DOUAGUIBE, Dede AJAVON, Kodjo FIAGNON, Samadou ABOUBAKARI, and Koffi AKPADZA, “Level of Satisfaction of the Post Partum Intra Uterine Device Users at Sylvanus Olympio Teatching Hospital of Lome (TOGO).” American Journal of Medicine Studies, vol. 6, no. 1 (2018): 1-6. doi: 10.12691/ajms-6-1-1.

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Burger King and Transnational American Studies: Lessons from the 2013 Nordic Association for American Studies Conference

Burger King and Transnational American Studies: Lessons from the 2013 Nordic Association for American Studies Conference

While the NAAS conference highlighted the rich possibilities of Scan- dinavian-American studies and called us to push outside the dominant geo- political heuristics of transnational American studies, the cluster of papers analyzing the evolving relationship between Asia and the U.S. overlapped with scholarly trends within the U.S. academy and highlighted the method- ological problems that trouble both U.S. and Scandinavian American stud- ies scholarly communities. Like the Scandinavian-American current at the conference, the papers on Asia sought to recover and highlight the diverse histories, voices, and texts through which the U.S. has engaged with other nations and regions. These presentations also underscored the importance of seeking out new directions for longer-standing transnational paradigms – in this case, those regarding the Pacific and Asia. This being said, we realize that to speak of “Asia” as if it is some monolithic, homogenous structure is a generalization that scholars of Asian American studies have trenchantly critiqued over the last decade. In fact, as Eric Hayot reminds us, recent transnational scholarship arising from the field of Asian American studies as well as transpacific, Asian diaspora, and U.S. empire studies aims to dis- pel this very assumption by recognizing many different “Asias” – nationali- ties, languages, and voices – that drive these fields of study. The tendency to seek connections with “Asia” or even specific nations like China without a methodological awareness of their immense diversity can easily bolster a fixed idea of Asia and, in so doing, encourage approaches that posit “Asia” as “a revelation about the nature of the United States, or Americanness, so that the rest of the world becomes interesting only when it says something about us” (Hayot 910). Instead, as Hayot argues, transnational approaches should strive to attend to the ways in which the diverse histories, literatures, and languages of Asia “interpenetrate and destabilize” “situations that have nothing to do with the United States” (910).
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Costa Rica Heredia. Spanish Language, Ecological, and Latin American Studies Fall 2014 / Spring 2015

Costa Rica Heredia. Spanish Language, Ecological, and Latin American Studies Fall 2014 / Spring 2015

The Heredia program offers three diverse academic areas: Spanish language, Ecological Studies, and latin American Studies. The intensive language approach allows you to complete up to two years of university foreign language coursework in only one semester to meet Spanish minor or major requirements. You may choose to stay for one semester or a full year and complement your language curriculum by taking courses in literature, political science, economics, history, art

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Are They "American" Enough to Teach Social Studies? Korean American Teachers' Social Studies Teaching Experiences in American Public Schools

Are They "American" Enough to Teach Social Studies? Korean American Teachers' Social Studies Teaching Experiences in American Public Schools

Ms. Kim shared her particular difficulties with Hispanic immigrants and African American students. She identified that Hispanic and African American students “with their victim mentality” did not make their utmost efforts to excel and were poorly disciplined to succeed in American school. She felt pitiful for those who were from low-income, minority families who do not try hard enough to succeed. Drawing upon her beliefs on the model minority myth and her journey to become a teacher as an Asian woman in the U.S., Ms. Kim argued that minority students should work harder, go to college, and pursue social mobility, rather than resisting against the system, no matter what circumstances they are situated within, in order to overcome their minority status. Citing Confucian philosophy on the parent-child relations, she also argued that parents are supposed to support their children’s education and be ready to sacrifice the rest. However, what she believed was not the same as what she experienced in her actual classroom. According to Ms. Kim, her students wanted their teachers, school, and the whole society to treat them equally and respectfully before they made their best effort to fit into it. Their parents did not show up at parent-teacher conferences and rather blamed her failure of in attaining academic success for their children. Ms. Kim considered it as a significant cultural gap and had a hard time to close the gap for the last 18 years.
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American Studies as a Contemporary Disciplinary Practice

American Studies as a Contemporary Disciplinary Practice

Perusing the literature of American Studies, the reader would be hard put to recognize that the object of the discipline, the United States, has for some time been and is emphatically so at the present moment the exemplary polity of capitalism. To account for this we need again to recall the logic of disciplinary self-constitution, whereby the discipline lets certain things be seen while others are marginalized or entirely passed over. In this sense, the founders of the discipline were candid about what they were doing in putting forth their conceptualizations of the essentials of American experience. To recognize this, all one has to do is go to the prefaces to the canonical texts of the discipline. Each of them starts with a description of the methodological assumptions underlying their interpretations. Thusly, due heed ought to be paid to a bracketed aside Perry Miller makes after stating that it was “obvious” to him that he had “to commence with the Puritan migration” “to begin at the beginning” in articulating his “vision.” The aside reads: “I recognize, and herein pay my tribute to, the priority of Virginia; but what I wanted was a coherence with which I could coherently begin” (viii). Needless to say, Jamestown in Virginia was not only prior to Plymouth but, more pertinent to my argument, it was blatantly a commercial enterprise. [8] A perusal of subsequent
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Displacing and Disrupting: A Dialogue on Hmong Studies and Asian American Studies

Displacing and Disrupting: A Dialogue on Hmong Studies and Asian American Studies

Monica Chiu: Yes, that’s another: How do I Begin. But it seems as if this book’s editor had asked each of the contributors to discuss “What does being Hmong mean to you?” Thus the collection comes from a sociological perspective, and I’m looking for literature, for memoir or fiction. I often think, “When will we have more Hmong literature from which to choose?” Even in the collection that Mark Pfeifer, Kou Yang, and I edited, Diversity in Diaspora [Hmong Americans in the Twenty-First Century], my essay was the only piece of literary criticism. One outside reviewer of the book manuscript said, “Chiu has done a nice book review of Yang’s Latehomecomer.” This reviewer did not know that I had written a piece of literary criticism in which I argued a thesis. It wasn’t a book review. I thought that was interesting; even those in the field don’t recognize Hmong and Hmong American literature, much less literary criticism about it. So what does one include on a syllabus in Hmong American Studies? The choices are pretty slim.
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DEPARTMENT OF LEADERSHIP AND AMERICAN STUDIES

DEPARTMENT OF LEADERSHIP AND AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 499. Independent Study in American Studies (credits vary 1-3) Prerequisite: senior standing. The purpose of this advanced, senior-level course is to en- able a qualifi ed student to enrich her/his program through independent work under the guidance of a faculty member. The topic and method of grading are agreed upon in writ- ing by the student and the supervising faculty member and fi led with the appropriate college offi ces by the end of pre- registration. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.50 is required. A student may take a maximum of three hours of independent study in a semester and a maximum of six hours in her/his academic program.
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