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Emerging Appropriate Fuzziness: A Spatiotemporal Observation of Post Martial Law Taiwan Literature and Cinema

Emerging Appropriate Fuzziness: A Spatiotemporal Observation of Post Martial Law Taiwan Literature and Cinema

Abstract Taiwan’s some four hundred years history, culturally and politically, is inscribed by relationships between rulers and the ruled that shape its social sophistication and gaps between forms of high culture and popular culture. Its built environment, inevitably, echoes this complexity as a representation. Examining Taiwan’s very recent built environment, most critically, this phenomenon is highlighted by the uncertainty that translates Taiwan society’s anxiety about connecting the yet passed authoritarian past and the seemingly democratic present when its post-war Martial Law period was officially terminated in 1987. This paper observes the immediate historicity today in Taiwan that represents this uncertainty, through scrutinising different cultural forms which the built environment has been identically (re)represented. As a central argument, this paper schematises a context which mediates different spatial objects that are derived from different cultural political origins, literature and cinema, where as texts in one context could be relevant, contradictory or even parallel, and suggests a form of appropriate fuzziness. This form, unlike the social conundrum driven by the awkward cultural and political status of Taiwan society, through ways of urbanisation, geo-identification and spatial idealisation, has pinpointed the possibility that directs Taiwan’s spatial evolution on the road ahead.
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THE ROLE OF CINEMA INTO SCIENCE EDUCATION

THE ROLE OF CINEMA INTO SCIENCE EDUCATION

Erin Brockovich is an unemployed single mother, desperate to find a job, but is having no luck. This losing streak even extends to a failed lawsuit against a doctor in a car accident she was in. With no alternative, she successfully browbeats her lawyer to give her a job in compen- sation for the loss. While no one takes her seriously, with her trashy clothes and earthy man- ners that soon changes when she begins to investigate a suspicious real estate case involving the Pacific Gas & Electric Company. What she discovers is that the company is trying quietly to buy land that was contaminated by hexavalent chromium, a deadly toxic waste that the company is improperly and illegally dumping and, in turn, poisoning the residents in the area. As she digs deeper, Erin finds herself leading point in a series of events that would involve her law firm in one of the biggest class action lawsuits in American history against a multi-billion dollar corporation.
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Indigenous or Exotic? Trees in Australian Cinema

Indigenous or Exotic? Trees in Australian Cinema

The association of the second baobab with love is reinforced later on after Drover and Sarah have spent their first night together: in ecstasy, the camera shoots off over the landscape in search of tumbling water, but on its way there it zooms past the second baobab. In connection with this link to love, one might wonder to what extent the mention of “Wrong-side Business” and a tree with evil spirits in it should be taken as a tasteless white subversion of an indigenous belief or just treated as a harmless joke. It rather depends on whether one can just take “Wrong-side Business” as a general euphemism for making love. If not, one may be in more sensitive territory, since early in Xavier Herbert’s novel Poor Fellow My Country (with which Hergenhan and Conor affirm Australia has links), Jeremy Delacy explains that “To Aborigines, love’s always a matter of law-breaking. You only fall in love with someone Wahji or Wrong-side to you” (24) and that the mangan, or native plum, is “supposed to have the power to attract and spellbind lovers, so that they may be crept up on and killed” (24).
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Italian Neorealist Cinema:

Italian Neorealist Cinema:

Bazin’s commentary that neorealist film practice teaches us something new about the basic structure of reality is contested by other film critics. They state that this theory ignores the ambivalence and ambiguity essential to any film or artwork that attempts to convey the impression of naturalness through the cine- matic apparatus. That feeling of ambivalence comes about by one’s own subjective state of mind, which Rossellini calls a moral position with which one looks at the world. This per- spective is shaped by the di›erences in our beliefs about what society ought to be and what it actually is. By focusing on the social injustices caused by the postwar economic system, these neorealist films promoted a sense of an under- lying neo–Marxist ideology. Thus, the move- ment came to a swift end with the passage of the Andreotti Law in ¡949, which gave the gov- ernment wide-ranging power over the cinema. As Undersecretary of Public Entertainment, Giulio Andreotti influenced “the ministry con- cerned with the cinema. He controlled govern-
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A stich in time: the story of Konark Cinema

A stich in time: the story of Konark Cinema

Looking at the fate of other movie halls, it was now time for the owner (after the death of Mr. Singdeo) Mr. Sanjeev Kumar Beora: son in law of Mr. Singdeo to take a strategic deci- sion of either shutting down the hall or go for its revival and upgradation. The owner was a risk averse person and didn ’ t want to invest any bit further in Konark and just wanted to maximize the profits. Despite of the huge losses, the management and the employees wanted the decision to be taken in favour of upgradation because they were very optimistic for future growth as there were numerous energizing examples from neighbouring cities; of useless theatres generating attractive revenues by successfully reviving and renovating them- selves to multiplex cultures, which no doubt needed huge investments from construction to purchase of new equipments. The important strategies under consideration were- enhanced focus on core users and ensuring that suppliers are also happy doing business, finding a way of always talking to customers and hearing about what they ’ re struggling with, excel at customer service, be fearless and acquire a fearless approach because with immense power comes greater responsibilities and with higher risks come higher returns. The condition of Mr. Beora was just like a player facing the Monty Hall 9 problem, not able to choose which door to select and open out of the two doors as choices present before him, one having a goat and the other having a precious car inside. The problem here was that Mr. Beora knew the two offerings but the only thing he didn’t knew was which door carried which offer for him. At this juncture, Mr. Beora wanted to divest the business as he was unable to generate profit since long time but was thinking seriously on the issue chewing betel in his mouth as he was standing on the crossroads of everything or nothing.
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Towards a General Economics of Cinema

Towards a General Economics of Cinema

Sobchack, for example, opens an essay on the thematics of depth in Titanic with the question, ‘How can we possibly account in a truly compelling way for the monumental popularity and emotional impact of James Cameron’s Titanic?’ (Sobchack 1999, 189). I want here not to propose a definitive answer to that question, but rather to consider how it might be approached from a different angle, one that does not require us to assess the film in terms of conventional measures of value. I want to suggest instead that a reading of Georges Bataille’s work on economics, expenditure and excess offers a way of thinking about cinema that does not return us to problematic oppositions between, for instance, ‘spectacle’ on the one hand, and ‘story-telling’ or narrative on the other, or to dubious evaluative models. Bataille’s concept of general economy, which takes as its central premise the assumption that cultural, social and biological systems are organized by a principle of excess or non-
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Introduction: Enjoying the Cinema (translation)

Introduction: Enjoying the Cinema (translation)

cinematográficos, este é um problema mais sério. Tirando The Fright of Real Tears (obviamente o seu livro mais cinematográfico), Žižek tende a tratar o cinema do mesmo modo com que trata os romances e contos, com a excepção dos poucos comentários isolados sobre a estrutura do plano ou o uso do som. Como diz Stephen Heath, “é um indício de que, na verdade, Žižek tem pouco a dizer sobre “instituição”, “instrumento”, etc., tudo o que diz respeito ao esforço prévio de pensar o cinema e a psicanálise (os filmes e romances serão, na maior parte, analisados sem qualquer distinção do ponto de vista formal)” (1999: 44). Vicky Lebeau repete este ponto afirmando que “é a especificidade do cinema que parece faltar no trabalho de Žižek – a relação entre espectáculo e imagem, projecção e narrativa” (2001: 59). Ao não conseguir distinguir adequadamente entre a interpretação de um filme e de um romance ou a considerar o impacto que o particular modo do aparelho cinemático tem no desenvolvimento da narrativa, Žižek desvaloriza a importância da forma, e é a distinção do cinema enquanto estrutura formal que atribui um fundamento existencial à disciplina de estudos cinematográficos. Segundo esta crítica, recusar respeitar a distinção formal do cinema como linguagem é eliminar a necessidade de se estudar o cinema como uma entidade em si mesma. Ironicamente, o tratamento da forma cinematográfica que Žižek leva a cabo em The Fright of Real Tears, teve pouco impacto no modo de se pensar o cinema. Nesse livro, Žižek elabora um conceito completamente novo de corte e inventa o seu próprio conceito suplementar de interface. Nenhuma desta inovações teóricas específicas da linguagem cinematográfica se tornou popular no mundo dos estudos cinematográficos. 3 Mas o próprio pensamento de Žižek conseguiu tornar-se popular.
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Cinema Komunisto: cinema as a memory site

Cinema Komunisto: cinema as a memory site

Cinema Komunisto is a documentary film born out of my search for meaning in ruins. Robert Frost once wrote that every poem starts as a lump in the throat, and this was the case when I decided to make a film about an abandoned film studio that had once been the crown-jewel of the Yugoslav film industry. Making the film was a cathartic process. More than once I filmed places which were being destroyed or closed, or captured testimonies of people who died before the film was finished. And while the five years I spent researching and writing what was my first feature-length film represent an artistic coming-of-age, a parallel process was taking place. Beyond the lyrical reflection on the themes I was interested in, there were philosophical arguments I wanted to make. They stemmed from a dissatisfaction with the public conversation I grew up in, one that proved unable to address the profound political and social disruption we had lived through. The field of history seemed ill-equipped to meet the challenge of expressing or critiquing events, and the language of politics seemed woefully inadequate. I was searching for another language with which to join the conversation. This is how, in addition to the artistic decision to make a film, I decided to expand my research into the academic sphere as well. My motivation was to go beyond questions of aesthetic expression, to analyze my film as a work of reasoning, and to anchor it to a current of thought I felt was running through films of people whom I consider my artistic ancestors.
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The City in Cinema: A Global Perspective

The City in Cinema: A Global Perspective

Film also shows how the city provides support to the arts through its concentration of artists and performers. This proximity enables the city to be a nexus for creativity that spans photography to painting to design (fashion, transportation, graphic, digital) to sculpture to musical composition and performance to theater and to cinema itself. Art in the public sphere can only take place in the city. Ahmad Abdalla’s Microphone (Egypt, 2011) is part fiction, part documentary, and is a love letter to the underground arts scene in Alexandria. The participants are hip-hop singers who perform on sidewalks, female rock musicians on rooftops, skateboarders cruising all over the city, graffiti artists who confront the city with their shocking murals in the darkness of the night. The movie is a vibrant image of this colorful music and art movement. It is a real narrative of this new generation of artists from Alexandria and the intricate details of their lives. This is a classic urban film. The city matters.
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The Impact of the Cinema on Young People (on the

The Impact of the Cinema on Young People (on the

representation of the elderly by very young people (students) if it shows some negative aspects of. 156[r]

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Music, Cinema and the Representation of Africa

Music, Cinema and the Representation of Africa

Despite the obvious oversight that machines do not function separately from those that use or even design them, it is precisely from this angle that the co-option of the camera by imperialist regimes must be approached. The overarching relationship between man/society and machine is what earmarked cinema as the perfect device for the consolidation of empirical and encyclopaedic categorisations of race used to justify interventionist policies. The strong emphasis on the corporeal and the ethnographic in early film corroborates this idea that cinema was a new medium for probing and fixing the body and behaviour of the “primitive”. This can be identified specifically in the extensive foregrounding of cultural performances such as dance/music, which was considered an apt method for “seeing” the anthropological claims about the body-bound identity of the savage/African. Rudolph Pöch goes so far as to assert that “dances are the simplest and most effective subjects for cinematography and the best means of practising the medium since they enable one to record what is most visual and effective when reproduced” (qtd. in Landau and Kaspin 212). Musical and dance expressivity were also seen as among the primary methods by which Africans performed their primitiveness because of the non-verbal nature of this medium. Rony declares the impossibility of speaking of ethnography without addressing race, which “consciously or unconsciously implies a competition involving time, and both cinema and anthropology enabled the viewer to travel through dimensions of space, time and status” (10).
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Loneliness in Cinema: A Pharmacological Approach

Loneliness in Cinema: A Pharmacological Approach

symptom of an affliction the nature of which remains undisclosed, and the mark of distinction in a world bereft of singularity. Compared to the automatized milieu, this loner is perhaps committed to the noetic and the spiritual. However, according to Stiegler’s pharmacological account we should not be looking for opposites but for difference. In that sense, isolation and loneliness might not be simple opposites of an alienating and impoverished reality. Qohen’s loneliness and the real world might be asymptotic, two planes that could never meet, just like himself and the universe in the opening scene. The narrative fleshes out this disparity in terms of time. In cinema we do not always know at which point we join a narrative; whether we start, for instance, from the beginning or from the end. Cinema often produces clarity in retrospect, as well as surprise at the unexpected, the anelpiston (Stiegler 2013) which may dash our expectations and hopes.
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Russians abroad in postcommunist cinema

Russians abroad in postcommunist cinema

This leads Wild to account for the film as reactionary rather than liberal. However, Bear’s Kiss should be seen in line with the European co-production that focuses more on financial return than on truthful representation. While it is clear what is wrong with the film, with its contrived effort of mixing pan-European national identities into a continuous narrative, what needs to be emphasised is their verification through the vetting process of the co-production mode. The representations must have been seen, judged, and approved by everyone, including the Russian producer, and hence agreed upon as reflecting sentiments in transnational audiences that would potentially buy cinema tickets. Thus, the film does not include a Soviet delegation as in White King, Red Queen, which saw Russians as a disparate group of people. In Bear’s Kiss, the Russian abroad is a single male Russian, in the form of a bear, who cannot be caged and consequently has to be released into the Siberian forest. It is here that the representation of Russianness in Bear’s Kiss is ambiguous, because the Russian beast/man cannot or should not be caged, since his rightful home is the Siberian forest. We cannot as a spectator be sure if the representation of Misha (Bodrov Jr) is a nationalistic one (Russianness cannot be caged), or one that reflects Western anxiety concerning Russia in the post-Soviet era (Russianness should be caged). In both cases, it appears that the post-Soviet Russian’s home is not in Europe.
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Primitivism and Contemporary Popular Cinema

Primitivism and Contemporary Popular Cinema

expression within contemporary primitivism, is a still-emerging mode of popular American cinema. By reading DWW in the context of this still developing mode, we can better understand its ideological work. For instance, while Avatar’s white male is the literal savior of his adopted tribe, defending the natives from the dystopian forces of an environmentally exploitative, neo-colonial military industrial complex, in DWW, the disappearance and defeat of the Lakota Indians and the closing of the American Frontier is always already presented as a foregone conclusion. As such, these two films, while holding so much in common, exhibit two very different mythologies of the white male savior. In Avatar, the white protagonist is a very literal on-screen image of the liberal white savior, dashing in to save a Third World primitive which cannot be expected to save itself from the onslaught of a colonial force. In DWW, the eco-Peace Corps-tourist- philanthropist simply abandons the Indians to their inevitable demise. The film’s emphasis on the passion of the white male body and its explicit invocation of the crucifixion suggest that DWW activates the passion of a white Christ. It does so in a way which caters to white guilt over the genocide of manifest destiny.
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Il cinema, l'automobile e la morte al lavoro [Cinema, cars and death at work]

Il cinema, l'automobile e la morte al lavoro [Cinema, cars and death at work]

ancora solo i piedi - nella configurazione in soggettiva dell'apertura del film – poi, quando si alza, le gambe e infine il fondoschiena mentre si sporge dalla finestra. Ancora non l'abbiamo vista in viso, ma solo a pezzi. Conclusi i titoli di testa la scena successiva ci mostra le amiche di Julia che sono venute a prenderla e si muovono in auto per le vie di Austin. Finalmente vediamo Julia in volto, anche se la sua posa è sempre quella di stare con le lunghe gambe di- stese e incrociate – sempre in imitazione della posa della Bardot –, i piedi nudi spesso in pri- mo piano rispetto al suo viso. Il dialogo ci rivela che Julia è una celebre speaker radiofonica, oggetto del desiderio dei maschi del luogo. Lungo la strada vediamo che la città è dissemina- ta di sue gigantografie. Icona, feticcio, oggetto di sguardo: Julia rappresenta l'attrice cinema- tografica, la cui immagine e le cui parti del corpo sono più importanti della sua persona. 21
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Vergílio Ferreira’s novels and the influence of cinema

Vergílio Ferreira’s novels and the influence of cinema

Published By Some critics consider the film an absolute disaster, not least because the neorealistic aesthetics were already in the past and Guimarães did not reveal the ability to define an alternative and consistent path. In fact, their neorealistic forays had no longer the conceptual framework provided by French and Italian cinematography, and in our country these ideals could never be affirmed and flourished. However, Guimarães will always be the prime example of the attempt to create a neo-realistic cinema (only shyly approached, for example, in Perdigão Queiroga's 1951 Dream is Easy). The example of this neo-realist director could have contributed to build a bridge between the letter and the image, able to influence Vergílio Ferreira, but the writer does not know the work or Guimarães himself before the experience of Final Song. In the presence of this argument, the possibility of finding a premeditated bond between the two creators is blurred. But the contribution of filmic Neo-Realism was not exhausted by Guimarães. Vergílio Ferreira thinks about some of his novels when the main filmic inheritances in neorealist novels are, above all, narrative strategies. In the 1950s, neorealist novelists will favor external focusing, dramatic representation of fictional events, and clear-cut discursive strategies such as montage, space division into planes, or the systematic use of audiovisual images to identify and to convey abstract content (Sousa, 2001, p. 129). These characteristics were analyzed by Baptista-Bastos (1959; 1962) who identified numerous points of intersection between neorealist novels and cinema.
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Framing non-western cinema at international film festivals: modern Thai cinema funded with foreign money

Framing non-western cinema at international film festivals: modern Thai cinema funded with foreign money

In an increasingly globalized environment, with easier access to an ever-growing variety of films (including many transnational co-productions), film festivals, in part out of the necessity to stay healthy financially, have been initiating more and more business-oriented side-branches. This, in turn, has led to increasing debates among scholars regarding what the function of film festivals is, or should be, and how festivals have both influenced the annual production of (world) cinema and the discourse surrounding it. As a result, scholars have discussed the dichotomies present at film festivals between notions such as national and transnational cinema, ‘first world’ production companies and ‘third world’ cinema, and cinema successful on the international film market versus cinema successful in local theatres. Scholars such as Thomas Elsaesser, among others, have argued that film festivals and their increased prominence have influenced the type of films made across the globe. 3 Others have taken this argument further and have questioned both the hierarchical relationships between first and third world countries these ‘festival films’ are part of, and the so-called ‘authenticity’ of these films. 4 These are complex and usually sensitive issues that deserve our attention and research. However, a good part of the essays and debates regarding non-western films have been written and conducted from the standpoint of scholars from this same ‘western world’ as well and, without making any judgment about the quality or validity of their contributions, I do believe that this background does - involuntarily and unconsciously or not - influence the framework within which they conduct their research and the points of references they use. This framework includes, among other things, a hegemonic vision of what constitutes film theory, film history and history in general. One frequent result of this framework is a lack of historical, cultural or spatial knowledge and expertise in regions other than ‘the west’, which in turn influences one’s perspective and research. While this is not necessarily problematic in itself, it can lead to problematic statements and claims. More importantly however, it limits the type and scope of possible research and analysis that is and can be done on non-western cinema. A remark by David Hanan in the introduction of Film in South East Asia: Views from the Region exemplifies how ubiquitous and persistent this hegemonic vision of film history in the
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LIST OF CINEMA HALLS IN DELHI ( AS ON )

LIST OF CINEMA HALLS IN DELHI ( AS ON )

Nagar, New Delhi Shri Subhash Chander Chachra, Director. 47 Satyam Cineplexes, Multiplex 4 M/s Satyam Cineplexes 26485041[r]

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War, Peace, and Cinema: Excerpts from the Foreign Policy of the USA with a Look at Stanley Kubrick’s Cinema

War, Peace, and Cinema: Excerpts from the Foreign Policy of the USA with a Look at Stanley Kubrick’s Cinema

Kubrick started long film production by making the film “Fear and Desire.” This was a movie about a group of soldiers who were confined behind the enemy war fronts in an imaginary war. At the end of the film, soldiers notice that the faces of their enemies are similar to those of themselves, and they were actually fighting with themselves. This movie was attracted by many critics who wrote clear and exact criticisms about it, although it was not sold desirably. Almost all his films are derived from famous novels, and he has been successful in presenting them in the body of films. He never in- tended to materialize the novels as exactly as they were written in words, but he used them at the ser- vice of the cinema, though he was faithful to the atmosphere, characters, and the stories. As an ex- ample, Richard Jenkins, the famous critic of cine-
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SHAKESPEARE CINEMA: ROMEO & JULIET

SHAKESPEARE CINEMA: ROMEO & JULIET

John Downes, 1708 Whenever a Shakespeare play is adapted for the cinema, there are always those who will complain that a certain scene has been missed out, that certain characters are not ‘as they should be’. It is rare that film makers take the liberty which Mr. Howard Jones did in the seventeenth century by completely rewriting the end of ROMEO AND JULIET in order to give it a happy ending! But since they are adapting the play for film - and because there are certain things that they can and cannot do on film - then changes do occur. It is also worth remembering that, like any stage production, a film is one person’s interpretation of the play. It is a possible re-telling of the story.
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