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EUROPEAN MIGRATION NETWORK  MIGRATION AND ASYLUM IN IRELAND: SUMMARY OF LEGISLATION, CASE LAW AND POLICY MEASURES AND DIRECTORY OF ORGANISATIONS, RESEARCHERS AND RESEARCH 2005

EUROPEAN MIGRATION NETWORK MIGRATION AND ASYLUM IN IRELAND: SUMMARY OF LEGISLATION, CASE LAW AND POLICY MEASURES AND DIRECTORY OF ORGANISATIONS, RESEARCHERS AND RESEARCH 2005

the recognition rate be calculated as the ratio of the number of “positive” decisions to the total of all cases finalised in the year in question. This may not be ideal, but is probably the simplest way to approach the issue. The problem of double counting is acknowledged, but no explicit direction is given other than asking countries to indicate how it is dealt with (if at all). The Department of Justice, Equality and Law Reform used this method to calculate a refugee recognition rate of 8.6 per cent and 9.0 per cent for 2003 and 2004 respectively. Cases finalised refer to those that are processed to the stage where the Minister for Justice, Equality and Law Reform is in a position to grant, or not to grant, a declaration of refugee status. (It is important to note that certain types of decisions taken in the period are therefore excluded from the calculation including applications considered ‘un-processable’ and applications dealt with under the provisions of the Dublin Convention.) 22
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To briefly summarize the forthcoming PDHRP PAR initiatives, we have undertaken a process evaluation of the project and our new directions will include several new partnerships with groups who have learned of this work and initiated collaborations, more bi-lateral activities, and less centrally organized work. Additionally, we have collaborated with local community leaders and church-based workers in the development of a Human Rights and Migration Project in Zacualpa, Guatemala, which serves as a resource and site for organizing and advocacy for and with families and communities affected by immigration, detention, and deportation. A team of psychologists traveled there for a month in the summer of 2010 for additional field work and collaboration with local community organizers; a law student spent spring semester 2011 working one week per month with the project; and the local team there is an educational and advocacy resource for deportees and families of U.S.-based migrants. BC-based researchers and the Guatemala team also recently completed a community survey exploring in more detail the factors that continue to push migrants north as well as the consequences for those left behind. Finally, the BC-based legal team consults regularly with the Zacualpa project vis-à-vis U.S.-based migrants from the region.
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Steve Gey — A Law Professor with a Commitment to Justice

Steve Gey — A Law Professor with a Commitment to Justice

In 2005, Steve worked closely with us again as our Counsel of Record lead- ing a team of researchers at the Florida State University College of Law and drafting the Feminist Majority Foundation’s amicus Brief (along with other Amici Curiae Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Inc., Medical Stu- dents for Choice, National Abortion Federation, National Coalition of Abor- tion Providers and Physicians for Reproductive Choice and Health) in support of respondents in Scheidler v. NOW and Operation Rescue v. NOW, 547 U.S. 9 (2006).

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DO WE REALLY WANT TO KNOW? RECOGNISING THE IMPORTANCE OF STUDENT PSYCHOLOGICAL WELLBEING IN AUSTRALIAN LAW SCHOOLS

DO WE REALLY WANT TO KNOW? RECOGNISING THE IMPORTANCE OF STUDENT PSYCHOLOGICAL WELLBEING IN AUSTRALIAN LAW SCHOOLS

These findings are also supported by Sheldon and Krieger. In their extensive research on changes in law student motivation, values and wellbeing throughout law school, they found that from early on in their studies, many law students re-orient themselves away from the positive values they bought with them to law school and towards more superficial extrinsic values. 36 In particular, in a recent study of nearly 500 law students in two law schools in the United States, they found a significant decline in the endorsement of intrinsic values (such as community service), and a significant move towards extrinsic values (such as appearance and image), throughout the first year of studying law. 37 They noted that a high number of first year students soon changed their motivation for studying law, with fewer reporting that they pursued their study for reasons of interest and enjoyment, and more reporting that they did it to please and impress others. 38 Finally, the researchers noted that those students who did achieve high grades in the first semester of their study, often shifted towards high-stress, money- oriented legal work and away from more service-oriented careers. 39 This shift was reflected in the words of one law student, who wrote:
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The Tortoise and the (Soft)ware: Moore’s Law, Amdahl’s Law, and Performance Trends for Human-Machine Systems

The Tortoise and the (Soft)ware: Moore’s Law, Amdahl’s Law, and Performance Trends for Human-Machine Systems

Some researchers would argue that what appears to be multitasking may actually be, at least in some cases, rapid task switching, involving shifting attention from one task to another every few seconds (e.g., Salvucci, Taatgen, & Borst, 2009). Whether it be multitasking or task switching or some combination, those of us who think we’re good at it tend to believe it strongly. Think how long it would take us if we were to do all those things one at a time! The empirical data seem to be mixed, with a tendency towards the notion that the time spent switching and ramping back up on the new task, washing out any real speed or reliability advances afforded by multitasking (e.g., Liefooghe, Barrouillet, Vandierendonck, & Camos, 2008; Meiran, Chorev, & Sapir, 2000). Whether or not multitasking or task switching tends to improve overall attentional abilities (e.g., Green & Bavelier, 2003, 2007) or otherwise improve performance in general, people are doing it, and work is needed to support it effectively in UI designs. Park (2014) has employed real-world tasks to examine what variables lead to the experience of “flow states” when multitasking. And this provides additional motivation for a renewed focus on usability. What is it that we have done already, in the realm of UI design or software engineering practices or HCI research, to support or reflect this focus?
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Socio-legal approaches to property law research

Socio-legal approaches to property law research

governmentality 39 and regulation 40 , for instance in Cowan and McDermont's critical analysis of the interconnected histories of housing provision through various tenure sectors in the UK. 41 In her multi- disciplinary study of property in 'the public realm' of the city centre, Layard draws on Lefebvre's theory of the right to the city 42 as well as on geographical and political analytical frameworks. 43 Bourdieu's theories of law as a site and mechanism of power 44 have been applied by socio-legal researchers, for example in analyzing the property rights of freeholders and leaseholders in a study comparing practices in the UK and New Zealand. 45 Socio-legal scholarship has also engaged with discourse analysis and theory more widely than in the context of the feminist approach discussed above, building on Bourdieu's observation that law is a particularly powerful discourse because it "brings into existence that which it utters". 46 Sarat and Kearns suggested that "law shapes society from the inside out, by providing the principal categories that make social life seem natural, normal, cohesive and coherent". 47 Among those categories are property and ownership, characterised by socio-legal scholars as persuasive narratives for making sense of the world. 48
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European Researchers  Night as a Learning Environment

European Researchers Night as a Learning Environment

In this paper, results are presented from an evaluation of European Researchers’ Night in Ireland in 2015. The event was hosted by Trinity College Dublin in partnership with the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Visitors to the event had the opportunity to see diverse research environments and participate in interactive installations, debates, tours, and presentations in four subject areas: human, technology, world, and society (RCSI 2015). In addition, visitors had the chance to engage directly with some of the country’s leading researchers in such areas as robotics, neuroscience, and zoology. Although similar types of public engagement events take place in Ireland (see Roche, Cullen, and Ball 2016; Roche, Stanley, and Davis 2016), European Researchers’ Night is the only event that makes labs and research centres publicly accessible for one night each year. While the primary focus of the evaluation was to better understand the attendees of the event, a secondary component involved exploring the informal learning that takes place at European Researchers’ Night. Informal learning is “usually intentional but not highly structured” (Marsick and Watkins 2001, 25). Over the last two decades, informal science
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Librarians as researchers

Librarians as researchers

In recent years the idea of librarians as those who support research seems to have taken centre stage, partly in my view, to the detriment of the idea that librarians are researchers themselves. Just think for a moment of how many scientists, researchers or academics would be unable to do their research without your work as a librarian? Not only do we preserve and make collections available, but we guide researchers. In health sciences librarians undertake systematic reviews, and those of us who look after special collections, preserve, catalogue and make available these materials which is indispensable to the research process. You may have got used to calling this ‘research support’ but it’s librarians who allow researchers in all disciplines to take existing knowledge and transform it into something new. We are a vital part of research already! I found an article by Claire McCluskey particularly inspiring, about the work she does as an embedded librarian (McCluskey, 2013) where librarians ‘co-create knowledge’ with academic staff. She also touches on issues related to the identity of librarians and she convinced me of the value of research and evidence-based librarianship when she says:
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Work stress and cancer researchers: an exploration of the challenges, experiences and training needs of UK cancer researchers

Work stress and cancer researchers: an exploration of the challenges, experiences and training needs of UK cancer researchers

Eighteen UK oncology researchers were recruited, including PhD students and researchers with (e.g. research nurses) or without clinical experience (e.g. research fellows). Participants were approached through universities, email lists, conferences and professional bodies. Participants were active researchers in oncology whose experience in this field ranged from between 1-8½ years. Recruitment was deliberately broad to ensure a wide diversity of experiences. Participants used a variety of research methods: 5 quantitative, 3 qualitative, 10 mixed methods. Table 1 presents the participant’s characteristics. For reasons of confidentiality, specific research topics are not disclosed but they included the psychosocial impact of cancer, clinical trials of treatment (some with a quality of life component), survivorship lifestyle interventions and palliative care projects.
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Work stress and cancer researchers : an exploration of the challenges, experiences and training needs of UK cancer researchers

Work stress and cancer researchers : an exploration of the challenges, experiences and training needs of UK cancer researchers

Eighteen UK oncology researchers were recruited, including PhD students and researchers with (e.g. research nurses) or without clinical experience (e.g. research fellows). Participants were approached through universities, email lists, conferences and professional bodies. Participants were active researchers in oncology whose experience in this field ranged from between 1-8½ years. Recruitment was deliberately broad to ensure a wide diversity of experiences. Participants used a variety of research methods: 5 quantitative, 3 qualitative, 10 mixed methods. Table 1 presents the participant’s characteristics. For reasons of confidentiality, specific research topics are not disclosed but they included the psychosocial impact of cancer, clinical trials of treatment (some with a quality of life component), survivorship lifestyle interventions and palliative care projects.
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Focus on Research : IRIS for teachers and researchers

Focus on Research : IRIS for teachers and researchers

Instruments for Research Into Second Language Learning and Teaching (IRIS) is a digital repository of materials used to collect data for research into second and foreign language learning and teaching. Since its launch in August 2012, it has attracted considerable interest internationally, with more than 10,000 hits and around 2,500 downloads. One of the aims of the project, which benefits from a wide support network of leading journal editors, research and teaching associations, is to make instruments used to collect second language data more easily accessible for teachers, as well as for novice and experienced researchers.
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Developing the capacity of researchers for collaborative working

Developing the capacity of researchers for collaborative working

While the term ‘collaborative reach’ characterises the extent to which a collaboration draws together varied partners, it also implies that collaborations with extensive reach may be able to attract funding and create research outputs that would otherwise not be possible. Bozeman and Corley (2004) argue that where researchers collaborate with others beyond their own work group they tend to have larger grants, an arrangement that is particularly relevant in the sciences. They refer to such researchers as ‘cosmopolitan collaborators’. There may be greater scope for pursuing mutual goals that have different value to the partners when working across such patterns of difference. But it is also the case that it may be necessary to work with external partners or develop external relationships even in the very early stages of a research career, something that is left to Phase 2 in the RDF descriptor. Fowler et al. (2009) argue that junior researchers may be working in institutions where few, if any, colleagues are engaged in similar research, so that it becomes essential for them to collaborate with
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AARLIN: Seamless information delivery to researchers

AARLIN: Seamless information delivery to researchers

The grouping of resources by subject area needs to be reviewed. When AARLIN was first conceived it was planned to start with a few key subject areas. The researchers who are participating in the pilot project are from a wider range of areas than originally planned and a larger list of subject areas has been developed. Given the cross disciplinary-nature of much research and of many information resources it may be appropriate to give further consideration to the most useful grouping of resources.

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STATISTICS IN ACTION: A COLLABORATION OF STATISTICIANS AND RESEARCHERS

STATISTICS IN ACTION: A COLLABORATION OF STATISTICIANS AND RESEARCHERS

The workshop was organized in such a manner to maximize the scope for discussions and collaborations between the researchers and statisticians. Hence the workshop was not limited to the four days of the event, but the time slots before and after the workshop were also utilised. The activities during each time slot are discussed below:

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Developing the capacity of researchers for collaborative working

Developing the capacity of researchers for collaborative working

Solomon et al. (2001) similarly suggest that it may not be in the best interests of researchers to relinquish the expert role and position themselves as learners. But the study by Karlsson et al. (2008) shows the power of relinquishing the expert role of the academic; researchers can learn how to learn and gain deeper understandings about their own professional learning process, which can have continuing positive implications for their workplace learning. Hakkarainen et al. (2004, p. 215–6) also consider the benefits which can be realised by movement across boundaries. Establishing spaces for dialogue in a collaboration, or incorporating specific roles into a research group to promote mutual learning need not, though, carry a stigma if the focus is also on opening up new avenues for research. Indeed, there is scope for funding bodies to realise the value that a focus on learning can bring within a research project. This would be true not only in terms of increased research capacity, but also for improved research outcomes.
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Students becoming researchers

Students becoming researchers

Although limited in scale, and involving only self-re- port data from students already interested in science, this study suggests that there is value for students in partici- pating in IRPs. The findings might be useful to teachers interested in supervising young people to carry out IRPs as they suggest opportunities that students need to be given in order to become researchers. These include freedom to devise a research question, ownership over data analysis and decision-making, and access to experts, whether in a specific technique (coding or preparation of reagents in these cases) or in the field more broadly.
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Post-Katrina Retention of Law Enforcement Officers: A Case Study of the New Orleans Police Department

Post-Katrina Retention of Law Enforcement Officers: A Case Study of the New Orleans Police Department

turnover rates ranging from zero to eighty-seven percent. The average turnover rate was fourteen and two-tenths percent. The average tenure of an officer prior to deciding to leave or resign from the department was 34 months. The average tenure reported by eighty-four percent of the agencies was less than three years. This revelation presents a critical period of between two years and ten months and three years for law enforcement agencies to employ programs to minimize attrition and retain officers beyond three years. However, the information presented in Yearwood’s study did not address the retention of police personnel post-disaster nor officers who are near or eligible for retirement. Post-Katrina attrition of officers was exacerbated as a result of retirements, resignations, dismissals, and deaths (Appendix R). There have been increases in the number of disasters worldwide both man-made and natural disasters worldwide, such as Hurricane Katrina, introducing new retention challenges for law enforcement which may require additional efforts on the part of law enforcement agencies to retain personnel during disasters.
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Students becoming researchers

Students becoming researchers

researchers must grasp in learning to be a researcher, Kiley and Wisker (2010) carried out interviews with supervisors of doctoral students across a range of disciplines, including the sciences, to find out what distinguished students who were thinking like a researcher from those who were not. They identified number of (Meyer and Land, 2003). These are concepts that result in a shift in thinking about a subject. They are often difficult for students to grasp but when they do, students can make connections they could not previously make, they have access to new ways of thinking about a subject and are better able to think and act as a researcher. In this sense, they are described as transformative. Grasping threshold concepts can result in students seeing their subject in a new light, and lead to changes in attitudes, feelings or values towards it. There is usually no going back once a student has crossed a threshold they are usually irreversible. Kiley and Wisker identified examples of threshold concepts associated with doing research to include identifying or shaping theory through their research, working within a framework, carrying out disciplined, or systematic analysis of data, and making an argument. Box 2 indicates some of activities that Kiley and Wisker found evident in novice researchers when they have crossed these thresholds to think and act like a researcher.
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The Connection Between Administrative Law and Criminal Acts of Corruption: Indonesian Law Perspective

The Connection Between Administrative Law and Criminal Acts of Corruption: Indonesian Law Perspective

Such authority is obtained through three sources, namely: attribution, delegation and mandate. The attribution authority is usually outlined through the distribution of state power by the Constitution or stipulated by Law. Meanwhile the delegation and mandate authorities are the authorities that come from delegation. The general principle of procedure rests on the three main foundations of administrative law, namely: (1) the rule of law principle, (2) the democracy principle, and (3) the instrumental principle. As an example, the rule of law principle relates to the protection of basic rights, e.g. the right not to submit documents of a privacy in nature, the right not to mention name or other identities in connection with objections raised against a request from another party or a draft of government action. One of the main points behind the establishment of the Indonesian Law No. 30 of 2014 on Government Administrative (Government Administrative Law) is directing the use of authority by agencies and/or government officials to always refers to the general principles of good governance or Algemene Beginselen van Behoorlijk Bestuur and the legislations. In addition to that, the establishment of such Law is also intended to provide legal protection for parties involved in the process of administering the government, both protection of citizens as affected parties and the government itself as the government administrator (Consideration part of the Government Administrative Law). Based on the above explanation, this article discussed the legal issue on the parameters of criminal acts of corruption under the Administrative Law from Indonesian law perspective by using normative legal research which employs statute and conceptual approaches.
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Growing together as teacher researchers

Growing together as teacher researchers

The director of the masters program initiated a campaign in May 2001 to recruit students who had dropped out. The strategies used in this campaign included calling the students by phone, finding e-mail addresses and sending e-mail messages, and looking for the teachers at their work places. They were invited to be part of a new academic proposal that would stimulate their intel- lectual potential as teacher researchers and would give them the opportunity to graduate. The plan for a professional updating seminar was presented to the Graduate Council in the School of Science and Education and received their approval.
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