Leadership and Management in Health and Social Care

Top PDF Leadership and Management in Health and Social Care:

Improving clinical leadership and management in the NHS

Improving clinical leadership and management in the NHS

Abstract: The National Health Service (NHS) is one of the UKs most cherished but political public institutions, providing healthcare, free at the point of delivery. The English NHS must make £20bn efficiency savings in the next 3 years whilst in the midst of fundamental structural change outlined in the government’s Health and Social Care Bill. This paper will explore the history of leadership and management in the NHS; the evolution of clinical leadership; national strategies to improve NHS clinical and managerial leadership and Lord Darzi’s pivotal NHS review. It defines the kind of leadership and management required for today’s NHS, looking to overcome some of the main challenges such as improving healthcare quality whilst making effi- ciency savings and engaging grass roots workers to deliver sustainable, long term improvements. Finally this manuscript makes suggestions as to where future investment is required to improve clinical leadership and management in the NHS.
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The enactment of plural leadership in a health and social care network : the influence of institutional context

The enactment of plural leadership in a health and social care network : the influence of institutional context

Power differentials derived from government policy, in the form of more managerial modes of organizing health and social care, have disrupted traditional professional organization, with senior professionals positioned as formally accountable under new managerial arrangements for networks (Ferlie et al., 2003). The effect of accountability regimes on leadership within English health and social care organizations is exemplified by the way those at the apex of the management hierarchy (“formal leaders”) have been castigated for failures in the delivery of health and social care. Recent examples within English health and social care include the sacking of health and social care leaders, such as the Director of Children’s Services, Haringey Local Safeguarding Children’s Board, following the death of “Baby P” (Laming, 2009), and the CEO at Mid-Staffordshire Hospital following patient deaths attributed due to poor quality service (Francis, 2013). The context of such threatening accountability has a potential “chilling effect” upon service improvement, since any formal leader, based upon their managerial accountability, may become rather defensive (Morris & Moore, 2000). Those located in formal leadership positions, with managerial accountability, may prove unwilling to spread leadership to others, and others unwilling to take up leadership positions (Currie et al., 2009; Heifetz, 2004).
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Leadership in interprofessional health and social care teams : a literature review

Leadership in interprofessional health and social care teams : a literature review

Concerns over leadership in the UK National Health Service (NHS) fi rst became an area of focus in the late 1980s when professional management was introduced (Mackie, 1987). When the labour government came to power in 1997, leadership capacity was recognised as a critical factor in the reform agenda; to modernise the NHS (Goodwin, 2000). The Department of Health set up a National Centre for Leadership in 2001 as part of the NHS Modernisation Agency and this led to a plethora of leadership initiatives commissioned by NHS organisations that included public health (McAreavey et al. (2001), a range of leadership frameworks (Bolden et al., 2003) and competency frameworks (Bolden et al., 2006). For nearly two decades, leadership development has been a priority within health care but less attention has been given to the effectiveness of leadership on the outcomes of teams. Reports on health service failures at an organisational level have further regularly identi fi ed poor leadership as a contributory factor in criminally negligent care (Keogh, 2013; Francis, 2013; Berwick, 2013).
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Health care leadership development and training: progress and pitfalls

Health care leadership development and training: progress and pitfalls

Abstract: Formal training in the multifaceted components of leadership is now accepted as highly desirable for health care leaders. Despite natural leadership instincts, some core leadership competencies (“differentiating competencies”) must be formally taught or refined. Leadership development may begin at an early career stage. Despite the recognized need, the number of comprehensive leadership development opportunities is still limited. Leadership training programs in health care were started primarily as internal institutional curricula, with a limited scope, for the development of faculty or practitioners. More comprehensive national leadership programs were developed in response to the needs of specific cohorts of individu- als, such as programs for women, which are designed to increase the ranks of senior women leaders in the health sciences. As some programs reach their 20th year of existence, outcomes research has shown that health care leadership training is most effective when it takes place over time, is comprehensive and interdisciplinary, and incorporates individual/institutional projects allowing participants immediate practical application of their newly acquired skills. The train- ing should envelop all the traditional health care domains of clinical practice, education, and research, so the leader may understand all the activities taking place under his/her leadership. Early career leadership training helps to develop a pipeline of leaders for the future, setting the foundation for further development of those who may chose to pursue significant leadership opportunities later in their career. A combination of early and mid-to-late career development may represent the optimal training for effective leaders. More training programs are needed to make comprehensive leadership development widely accessible to a greater number of potential health care leaders. This paper addresses the skills that health care leaders should develop, the optimal leadership development concepts that must be acquired to succeed as a health care leader today, some resources for where such training may be obtained, and what gaps are still present in today’s system.
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Esker Ri Nursing Home, Kilnabinnia, Clara, Offaly

Esker Ri Nursing Home, Kilnabinnia, Clara, Offaly

Esker Ri Nursing Home is a purpose-built, residential centre with places for 67 residents that is currently registered for 28 places. The provider had applied to the Chief Inspector for a variation under Section 52 of the Health Act 2007 as amended to provide places to a further 29 residents. This follow up inspection focused on a number of specific outcomes following the centre's recent registration inspection and the centre's application to open a second wing. This inspection was unannounced and took place over one day.

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Awareness and Disposal Practices of Unused and Expired Medication Among Health Care Professionals and Students in A Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital

Awareness and Disposal Practices of Unused and Expired Medication Among Health Care Professionals and Students in A Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital

When evaluating the awareness about environmental hazards349 (89%) were aware of the significance of improper disposal, whereas 20 (5%) participants respondent, mainly studentsmentioned that improper disposal do not cause any harm. It was found that 304 (77%) of the participants were not aware of the national drug take back programme existing in other countries. About 341(87 %)participants suggestedimplementing such programmes in India by creating awareness through Government programmes 24 (6%) and via healthcare professionals 51 (13%). Overall opinion was to combine both government and healthcare personals(79.6%) for creating awareness (Figure 3). The appropriate source of awareness to inform about proper disposal were internet/ social media104 (27%)(Table 2).
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Evaluation of Role of Family Physicians in Management and Diagnosis of Hypertension in Primary Health Care Centers

Evaluation of Role of Family Physicians in Management and Diagnosis of Hypertension in Primary Health Care Centers

Family physicians should aim for diastolic blood pressure (DBP) of less than 90 mm Hg, as it has been proven to have improved outcomes [25-27]. Advanced age patients with moderate hypertension and above had improved cardiovascular status and decremented mortality rates with active treatment, blood pressure below 150/90 mm Hg was linked to this betterment of health and decreased stroke risk [28-30]. Controlling hypertension is known to significantly reduce its unfavorable consequences. Gueyffier F et al. [6] investigated antihypertensive beta- blockers and thiazides drug therapy and showed that females had decreased risk of stroke and major cardiovascular complications, while men responded more in terms of reduced mortality, coronary problems, and also strokes and major cardiovascular complications. Generally, in the newly diagnosed patients that are under 60 and not African American descendants, we prefer to start the management with ACE inhibitors, or ARBs if side effects were noted. In African Americans or older patients (> 60 years old), calcium channel blockers (CCB) and/or Thiazide type diuretics are preferred as first-line agents over ACE inhibitors, as the former showed better ability in lowering blood pressure and effectiveness in decreasing strokes [31]. However, In both of these cases, the second-line therapy is always by means of combining both mentioned drugs or by combining ACE inhibitors with thiazide- type diuretics. Moreover, as the third step giving the patient the full regimen of ACE, CCB and thiazide are recommended [4]. Nevertheless, all patients with diabetes or chronic renal injury should tailor their treatment for a blood pressure below 140/90 mm Hg [32]. The recommended treatment for diabetic and renal injury individuals is an ACE inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) regardless of racial origin. Concurrent administration of ACE inhibitors and ARBs could lead to disastrous consequences, mainly renal complications and thus shall be monitored [32]. The family doctor should consider giving two initial drugs simultaneously only in patients with comorbidities and severely elevated blood pressures [5, 32-34].
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Public involvement in health research: what does ‘good’ look like in practice?

Public involvement in health research: what does ‘good’ look like in practice?

Example of pragmatic decision-making in involvement Members of PenCRU’s Family Faculty can ‘dip in and out’ of research in a way that fits with their personal lives, and without having to justify their varying levels of engagement. Families of children with long-term health conditions live complex lives and fluctuating circum- stances dictate their time available. PenCRU Family Fac- ulty meetings are held during school hours since that suits more members who are parent carers. Not all members can attend meetings at these times and those unable to attend are therefore given the option of input- ting by email or phone. During meetings, members of the Family Faculty often want to be available should their children’s school get in contact in an emergency, so parents are can keep their phones on at meetings and leave the room if taking a call.
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Self perception of country health and correlation with the child's  oral health care

Self perception of country health and correlation with the child's oral health care

academic life of the child. This leads us to understand the majority of females reported by the present study. It also corroborates with our study Reis (2010), which reports that the other factor that can elucidate the greater presence of women: the fact that women are culturally closer to their children's school life, or even social context, where families can be composed only by the female figure as responsible for the home. As evidenced by the predisposition variables where it was possible to be observed in the study, that the age and sex of the participants did not have a statistically significant relevance when associated with the parents' self-perception of oral health, therefore they were not determinants, as opposed to the schooling factor very influential in parents' response. Converging with the already consolidated literature, where reports are found, that the educational factor should have a direct influence on the level of information of the participants and on the importance that the individuals themselves have with regard to oral health. For Palácios et al. (2015), in their study, they cite that the higher the schooling, the lower the negativity of the health indicators of a certain population. Participants were asked if they had already taken their children to the dentist, where 87% (n = 47) answered yes, thus exposing the use of dental services and the critical sense of value that they give to such an attitude. As Freddo et al. (2008) notes, a regular visit to the dentist should be done at least once a year for routine examinations and follow-up of any oral health disorder. The authors also declare that the use of dental services is in line with the positivity of the Social Determinants of Health, in what confers to its stability. Thus
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Research of place and importance of the leadership in effective  crisis management

Research of place and importance of the leadership in effective crisis management

The crisis is a subject which gains importance for leaders in terms of increasing and extending the activities of the organization which they manage. The crises which arise from both internal and external factors, affect the organizational, administrative and economic structures of the managements in There are some powers that provide the groups, managements and societies to develop development, change and proceed. Leaders are the leading powers. More generally, the leaders determine the configuration and formation of the history. The internal dynamics, mental structures, attitudes and iors of the leaders are different from the normal persons. This difference takes them to the leadership position (Güney, 2012:31). To constitute and evoke human groups who tend towards specific objects and targets, require a separate skill talents which are not found easily in every person. When many definitions in literature related with the leadership are studied, this concept may be identified as gathering a group of persons around specific objects and the ge of evoking those people for
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A model of community capacity building for sustainable dengue problem solution in Southern Thailand

A model of community capacity building for sustainable dengue problem solution in Southern Thailand

Efforts of control dengue prevention and control have been redirected from central Thai Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) to local administrative organization (LAO) using all the leader and non-leader group because the problem of dengue is a community problem needing to be solved by the community [15,20]. The community capacity building process was a different strategy ap- plied in these three communities. A principle researcher, the leader group, and the support team were discussion appropriate techniques and methods of analysis of the dengue problem and how to resolve it in each commu- nity for 13 months (October, 2009-October, 2010). However, the sustainability needs the long-term com- munity-based maintenance of the health program [32]. This study demonstrates positive results because it de- fined the sustainability of community-based dengue so- lution as the successful outcome of community capacity building for dengue prevention and control, and is measured by: 1) the increasing level of community ca- pacity domains; 2) the decreasing of entomology index as larval indices; the Breteau Index (BI), House Index (HI), and Container Index (CI); and 3) the decreasing epidemiological index for the morbidity rate and mortal- ity rate of dengue [7-10].
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Management and care of mixed states

Management and care of mixed states

Dalle evidenze sperimentali, si possono desumere inol- tre alcune considerazioni specifiche sull’impiego del valproato nel trattamento delle manie miste: la gravità dei sin[r]

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E-health and primary health care: telemedicine in the greek  national health system

E-health and primary health care: telemedicine in the greek national health system

At a global level, e-Health implementation is governed by the e-Health Resolution adopted by the 58 th World Health Assembly in 2005 and aimed at better understanding (WHO, 2005) as well as its e-Health standardization and interoperability of World Health Organization (WHO, 2013), which stresses the need for standardization and interoperability of electronic applications, convergence of standards and their evaluation using common indicators, for comparable results. Also last year, the World Health Organization, in collaboration with the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), provided in the form of a manual the necessary guidelines to facilitate states in developing their national e-Health planning. This WHO-ITU National e-Health Strategy Toolkit (2012) is a comprehensive action plan and monitoring of e-Health applications and can be implemented by all countries wishing to develop or upgrade their national policy for e-Health, regardless of the level they are at today. Among the states that tried to set up integrated e-Health networks, we can find Finland (Ministry of Social Affairs and Health-Finland, 2015), Switzerland (OECD, 2017), Scotland (Scottish Government- NHS Lothian, 2016) and Australia (Australian Government- Department of Health, 2012). A prime example of harnessing the potential of new technologies is the integrated e-Health network developed in Alaska. This network includes around 12 hospitals and 900 other health care providers in the region, and it connects more than 4,000 users who communicate with each other by exchanging over 200,000 messages (Alaska eHealth Network - AeHN, 2015).
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Leadership effectiveness and competencies of management committee of consumer cooperative societies in Hawassa City, Snnpr, Ethiopia

Leadership effectiveness and competencies of management committee of consumer cooperative societies in Hawassa City, Snnpr, Ethiopia

Effective cooperative leaders matters to the overall performance and well-being of cooperatives. Management committees are members elected by the general assembly to supervise and control the overall business and affairs of cooperatives. Thus, success of any cooperative is determined by the his study is to measure the leadership effectiveness and competencies of management committees of consumer cooperatives in the study area. For this study, primary data has collected from 263 respondents (i.e. 200 members and 63 consumer cooperatives. Descriptive statistics such as mean, frequency and percentages were used for analyzing the data. For measuring the leadership effectiveness of management committees, 31 statements classified under four major indicators idered. The Leadership Effectiveness measured based on members’ perception by using five point Likert scale and the mean score was calculated. The results indicate that management committees of cooperatives were not effective in leading others, leading self, strategic leadership and task management of cooperatives. Regarding leadership competencies, only few cooperative leaders have high experience in leadership and high interest in their leadership; most leaders’ lacks ement. In addition, majority of leaders have better human skills, though they lack conceptual skills and technical skills. Therefore, to improve the leadership effectiveness and competencies of cooperative leaders, leadership training and development programs
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MP_Schubert_mhGAP_in_Jordan_2018.pdf

MP_Schubert_mhGAP_in_Jordan_2018.pdf

among refugees receive a great deal of public attention and seem a logical consequence of refu- gees’ situation, MDs preceding the war are often overlooked, and may pose an even more press- ing health need than stress disorders. Before the war, mental and substance abuse disorders, in- terpersonal violence and self-harm accounted for 11.63% of DALYs and 18.4% of total preva- lent MH-related cases in Syria (IMHE, 2016). Conditions such as schizophrenia, schizoaffective and bipolar disorders, and dementia require uninterrupted medical treatment, because the conse- quences of irregular medication can be physically, mentally, and socially damaging for the pa- tient and pose a burden on his or her social environment. Contrary to public perceptions, PTSD cannot and should not be treated before the individual is under safe conditions, which, by defini- tion, is uncommon among refugee populations (Herman, 2015). Often, the symptoms of PTSD manifest themselves long after the threatening situation is over. It may require years to realize the psychological damage caused by a traumatic experience. Professional Psychosocial First Aid (PFA), however, aims to educate patients about their symptoms and coping strategies and pro- vides individual guidance and support in moments of crisis. This may be a helpful tool to prevent future MDs and to alleviate refugees’ acute emotional distress (IMC, 2015). In sum, refugees’ psychosocial situation is indeed a special one that is comprised of pre-war MH conditions, traumatic exposures and their potential consequences, stressful living conditions faced by
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St Pappins Nursing Home, OSV 0000178, 10 January 2018

St Pappins Nursing Home, OSV 0000178, 10 January 2018

The centre kept an accident and incident log. All incidents were recorded and reported as part of the PIC weekly management report to the senior management team. records showed clear evidence of learning from incidents for example a recent review of falls information had led to new staff deployment schedule to ensure that a member of staff was allocated on each shift to provide supervision in the communal lunges on each floor. The PIC reported that the number of un-witnessed falls had been reduced as a result of the planned supervision.

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Not your grandmother’s tea dance : followership and leadership lessons from ballroom dancing

Not your grandmother’s tea dance : followership and leadership lessons from ballroom dancing

Having taken this literally and put it into physical practice, we have been able to explore the “practicing [...] of leader- and followership” (Küpers 2013) as it “arises from direct and engaged participation in bodily experiences, acts and responses of living and organising” (ibid.). We looked at these issues in a range of practical workshops, where participants were invited to partner up, establish a ‘team relationship’, whilst being aware of their own body and balance, listening to and communicating (non-verbally) with their partner, using their senses as well as reflection to experience and explore some of these complexities for themselves. It was fun and a challenge! Workshops involve ‘leadership’ dynamically moving between leader and follower (including swapping roles) and a ‘mini competition’, as well as pauses for
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Destigmatisation : a grounded theory of the work of sexual health nurses : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy in Nursing at Massey University

Destigmatisation : a grounded theory of the work of sexual health nurses : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy in Nursing at Massey University

There are few models of care based on the knowledge and experience of nurses in sexual health practice that are available to inform the social management of clients.. It is recommended t[r]

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Dynamics of social economy portrait and environmental health

Dynamics of social economy portrait and environmental health

This study aimed to describe the survival strategies of migrant citizens in their new social environment different from their respective areas. This study used a qualitative approach cored on sis in this study is a migrant population of people living in the region of Southeast Sulawesi Government Konawe. Data collection efforts in the field using observation, interviews and Focus Group Discussion (FGD) on the existence of a migrant f people with a variety of Problems. The results show the social reality of migrants in regulating social life shows the pattern of social relations between members of transmigration community with local residents as well as with other migrant communities, is more dominant in the social relationship communicative, indivisible, interdependent, harmonious and associative. Although behind the phenomenon that also includes the seeds of social relations dissociation, dis integral and of competition, the various factors that cause a small portion migrants society continue to leave the social environment of his new, and most now they have had great success building a foundation of social and economic life gradually people leave his native village with the goal of building a future orientation. These results are expected to be considered as a policy to prevent conflicts horizontal and vertically between resettlement and local communities.
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Proactive Case Management: Social Work Active Engagement Revisited

Proactive Case Management: Social Work Active Engagement Revisited

While the types of case management models and the client population may vary greatly, there is still a strong body of work demonstrating the benefits of case management. One example is a controlled trial test of a case management algorithm designed to reduce suicide risk among suicide attempters during six months after the first attempt (Vaiva, Walter, Arab, Courtet, Belleview, Demarty, Duhem, Ducrocq, Goldstein & Libersa, 2011). This study demonstrated two strategies of case management intervention showing a significant reduction in the number of suicide attempt repeaters. Two easily replicated and inexpensive methods - regular calls from a case manager and discharge information cards reduced repeat suicide attempts by 8% (Vaiva et al., 2011). Another example of case management success was reported by Chuang, Levine, & Rich (2011) studying 141 patients with COPD. This study evaluated the effects of patient education, frequent case management contact with the patient and a specific action plan for symptom exacerbation (Chuang et al., 2011). The results of this study showed an overall decrease in paid claims, an increase in primary care physician contact, and a downward trend in hospital admissions, bed-days and ER visits for the intervention group (Chuang et al. 2011). A unique study to determine if increasing services and nursing case management would decrease the number of chronically ill persons transitioning to full Social Security Disability found "participants increased their use of medically-appropriate services and had better long-term health outcomes" (Hall, Moore & Welch, 2011, p. 126). All of these studies found an increase in primary care physician contact but a decrease in more costly ER and in-patient bed-days with an over-all report of higher patient satisfaction and improved health outcomes. In fact, a study conducted by Ercan-Fang, Gujral, Greer & Ishani (2013) evaluated the perception of physicians concerning the benefits of case management in a population of 278 diabetic patients. The results were overwhelmingly positive in reference to physicians’ perceptions (Ercan-Fang et al., 2013):
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