marketing of Quantity Surveying Services

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The Status of Marketing in Quantity Surveying Consultancy Firms

The Status of Marketing in Quantity Surveying Consultancy Firms

Unfortunately, construction management researchers have been silent about this most important aspect of business development. The literature available on marketing in the professional industry is more generic in nature (Kotler and Conner, 1977; Lidstone, 1984) and mostly combines consulting engineering practices with several other professional services such as accounting, medicine, brokerage, insurance etc. (Rwelamila & Bowen, 1995).However, the distinctive business environment of the QSC Firm makes the assumption that marketing approaches used in other commercial settings will necessarily work in the QSC Firm inappropriate (Morgan et al., 1994) Morgan and Morgan (1991) reports that such literature are prescriptive in nature and are also based on the experiences and observation of American practising marketing consultants rather than an academic research.
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Application of Marketing Strategies in Nigerian Quantity Surveying Firms

Application of Marketing Strategies in Nigerian Quantity Surveying Firms

In spite of the foregoing, it is observed in practice that marketing in professional QS firms is viewed as less important to the management and survival of the firm than finance and personnel issues (Morgan, 1992). According to Rutland (1991, p.37), the reasons for the neglect of marketing by construction firms are the facts that Marketing is seen as unimportant and unprofessional, the necessary skills are lacking, clients’ immediate needs are always put first, crisis management prevails in the firms, the discipline for a sustained marketing effort is lacking, and there are no written, measurable marketing plans. Pearce (1992) traced the origin of the apathy to marketing by construction professionals to the ‘English Gentleman’ behaviour of the early construction professionals. The early professionals pretended that they were not in business, but were merely responding to their peers’ requests for services. This tradition has been handed down to generations of construction professionals to the extent the limits of marketing observed in practice are more stringent than those actually set by professional codes of ethics. In Nigerian QS firms, marketing is treated with even more levity: marketing expenditures are often viewed as short term costs (rather than long term investments); and as financially unaccountable (Schulz & Gronstedt, 1997). Clark (2004); Rust, Lemon & Zeithaml, (2004); Srinivasan & Bharadwaj (2004); O’Sullivan & Abela (2007) and Seggie, Cavusgil & Phelan (2007) linked the lack of use of marketing with the difficulty in measuring return on marketing. Ifezue (2005) blamed it on marketing’s intangible nature, which hinders its quantification for planning purposes. Jaafar, Abdul Aziz & Wai, (2008) attributed it to lack of management commitment, understanding and acceptance of the marketing concept, and the incompatibility of marketing with ‘professional ethics’ Kadiri & Ayodele (2013) blamed it on the absence of good marketing strategies in QS firms. As remarked by Naranjo, et al., (2011), although marketing in the manufacturing sector is a well-known discipline, in the construction industry it is still misunderstood, as a result marketing is not viewed as a legitimate management activity in most QS firms (Tarawneh, 2013). The prevalence of these barriers to QS service marketing in Nigeria contributed to the finding that the level of marketing by professionals in the Nigerian construction industry is inadequate compared to the severity of competition in the industry (Ojo, 2011).
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Constraints to Quantity Surveying Awareness in Nigeria

Constraints to Quantity Surveying Awareness in Nigeria

The conservative attitude of Quantity Surveyors has also been identified as another major factor hindering the awareness level of Quantity Surveying profession in Nigeria. Various traces of conservatism by Quantity Surveyors have also been identified. These include lack of good marketing strategy, sub-consultant status, inability to embrace change and inability to invest in necessary technology. Writing on the survival strategies for Quantity Surveyors, Onyeri (1989) accused Quantity Surveyors in Nigeria of hiding behind the legal cloak of Decree No. 31 of 1986 and past glories while their services were being eclipsed by the intrusion of allied professionals. The paper advocated a paradigm shift by Quantity Surveyors from such mundane behaviours as over reliance on government and local markets as sole sources of patronage; and continued specialization on building works to the disregard of involvement in other areas like engineering facilities, petrochemicals and gas industries. For instance, in a study on the involvement of Quantity Surveyors in the execution of Civil Engineering projects in Southwestern Nigeria, Awodele (2006) found that 85% and 15% of the respondents respectively claimed that their cost management was exercised by Engineers and Quantity Surveyors. Similarly, writing under the caption “a case for direct appointment of Quantity Surveyors”, Isiadinso (1987) lamented the practice whereby Nigerian Quantity Surveyors accepted sub-consultancy status to Architects and Engineers instead of insisting on direct appointment by construction clients. This practice has succeeded in shielding the identities of Quantity Surveying consulting firms from private clients in Nigeria.
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Dimensions of Organisational Culture in Quantity Surveying Firms in Nigeria

Dimensions of Organisational Culture in Quantity Surveying Firms in Nigeria

QSFs are not without further challenges, most of which threatens their existence, growth and success (Frei & Mbachu 2013). According to Matipa, Kelliher and Keane (2009), consultancies tend to have a relatively small number of personnel, and Aliyu (2011), Smith (2011), Hardie et al. (2005) and Smith (2004) allude this assertion to QSFs. It is a challenge because QSFs will find themselves in dissonance to the logic of ‘the bigger, the better’ in business parlance. For instance, due to the smallness nature of QSFs, the research of Hardie et al. (2005) find that they do not innovate because of lack of money and time. Lack of time could be attributed to lack of adequate personnel to complete tasks on time. Other problems facing QSFs globally include the inability to deliver value for clients due to lack of value management knowledge (Bowen et al. 2010), and low diffusion of services rendered among clients due to poor marketing (Pheng & Ming 1997). One instance is Nigeria where many have still not come to terms with what quantity surveying as a profession is all about (Kadiri & Ayodele 2013), which is a question of identity (Onwusonye 2013).
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Evolution of Quantity Surveying Practice in the Use of BIM the New Zealand Experience

Evolution of Quantity Surveying Practice in the Use of BIM the New Zealand Experience

Eastman et.al. (2011) describe the existence of third party software tools capable of extracting quantities from various BIM authoring tools which “allows estimators to use a takeoff tool specifically designed for their needs without having to learn all of the features contained within a given BIM tool” (p278). Vico a BIM related software company in a online release (2011) stated “There is no easy button” for quantity takeoff” and made clear that the ability of measurement software to produce a schedule of quantities is limited according to the way the model is built. Taylor and Bailey (2011) observe that for the contractor to develop cost and schedule forecasts from a designers 3D model, they must input reference codes and correct the model where 2D input was used instead of 3D “or make the decision to use 2D printouts and manual methods of estimating and scheduling”(p3). Whitmore 2012 reports in the context of Australia that design consultants have created their own libraries of objects “which results in differing information being extracted from BIM models for similar elements or products”(p19). He offers the opinion that standardising the naming of object properties is the essential next step.
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Continuing professional development for the quantity surveying profession in South Africa

Continuing professional development for the quantity surveying profession in South Africa

In 2006 Gildenhuys (2006) conducted a survey among quantity sur- veyors in South Africa as part of his post-graduate studies. A question- naire was drawn up and distributed on a random basis to registered quantity surveyors throughout the country. A total of 56 completed questionnaires out of 70 were returned, a response rate of 80%. Although the results from the completed questionnaires cannot be seen as a representative indication of the situation regarding CPD in South Africa because of the relatively small sample, some meaning- ful conclusions can be made from the results. The outcomes of some of the questions are discussed below:
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Insights into The Push Factors of Innovation Adoption of

Professional Services Firms: The Case of Ghanaian Quantity

Surveying Firms (QSF)

Insights into The Push Factors of Innovation Adoption of Professional Services Firms: The Case of Ghanaian Quantity Surveying Firms (QSF)

not ordinarily available within the departments or agencies of the Clients (Ijigah et al., 2012). The construction industry operates in an environment which is occasionally undergoing transformation, causing the materials, technologies and other inputs implemented in construction to also experience changes at a very fast rate; making it essential for the QS firm to intermittently keep their practices up to date (Ofori, 2012). Furthermore, the object of Ghana Institute of Surveyors (GhIS) is among all things is to secure the adoption of innovation in the advancement of the profession of surveying and its members (Ghana Institute of Surveyors, 2015). However, the advancement of an industry can be achieved by enhancing or adopting new approaches to delivery of projects (Kissi et al., 2012). Agolla et al. (2016) did a study on the empirical investigation into the drivers and barriers of innovation in public sector organizations regarding developing countries to identify some available factor that can push innovation adoption in the public sector, as well as the challenges that are capable of limiting innovation adoption. Torku et al. (2017) also identified the impedance to innovation practices in the Ghanaian Construction Industry, particularly the Quantity surveying firms. Torku et al. (2017) furthered his research activity to find out the measures to enhance the innovation adoption in Ghanaian Quantity Surveying firms, with less focus on the drivers of innovation. In Ghana, less focus has been on the push of innovation adoption regarding professional service firms, especially Quantity Surveying firms. This paper resolves the problem by aiming to address the available push factors of innovations in Ghanaian Quantity surveying firms. The outcome of the paper is expected to elucidate understanding of these push factors for policy discussion in order to help comprehend how innovation occurs in practice. The study uses 5-point Likert Scale with the help of Mean Score Rank Analysis and One Sample Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test to measure the responses from the population. Ghanaian Quantity Surveying Firms and Policy makers will benefit from the outcome of this study by investing in the drivers of innovations especially programmes promoting access to technology, so as to enhance innovation adoption in the professional services firms.
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Assessment of Quantity Surveying Firms' Process and Product Innovation Drive in Nigeria

Assessment of Quantity Surveying Firms' Process and Product Innovation Drive in Nigeria

Musa et al. (2010) posit that Quantity Surveyors proactively think of ways of trying their skills in very important software packages like Master Bill, WinQS, Computer Aided Taking off (CATO), Super Project, RIPAC among others. Quantity Surveying firms strive to be leaders in the construction industry, thereby aspiring beyond their current capability and resources. The attitude of aspiring beyond current capability has been identified as the second most important attribute among innovators which capsulize the goal of progress and continuous improvement by finding better combinations of resources (Hamel et al., 1989; Stopford and Baden-fuller, 1994; Owusu-Mamu et al. (2018). Stopford and Baden-Fuller (1994) perceive proactiveness not to be the first to create something new but rather, thinking ahead and adopting the necessary changes for the unexpected future. Quantity Surveyors are proactive in renewal when they borrow other ideas as a means of breaking from past behavior. Quantity Surveyors are seen as been proactive by their usage of very important packages of software (Owusu-Mamu et al., 2018). Thus, Ekung and Okonkwo (2015) submitted that the Quantity Surveying profession is not static in responding to the changes in the construction market regarding the services it renders as the profession diversify its practices to meet the demand of both public and private clients in the industry. Preece et al. (2008) argued that organizations that are more likely to survive the turbulent construction business environment will be those that add value to clients' through innovative ideas and excellent performance. Therefore, for the Quantity Surveyors in the industry to remain champions in the process innovation, they should work hard to control vices such as corruption and ensure accountability, transparency, and continuing professional development of its members (Owusu-Manu et al., 2018).
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An empirical assessment of innovation practices of quantity surveying firms in Ghana

An empirical assessment of innovation practices of quantity surveying firms in Ghana

Business innovation is broader in scope than the other dimensions of innovation (Sawhney et al., 2011). In spite of this, the business concept of innovation is neglected during the measurement of the overall innovation capacity of companies (Vilà and MacGregor, 2007). Sawhney et al. (2011) defined business innovation as the establishment of substantial or radical novel value for customers and the firm by creatively changing one or more of the current business systems or completely establishing novel business systems. Business innovation is only germane if it creates value for customers (new value, not new things) and if the customers are also willing to pay for it, thereby creating value for the firm (Sawhney et al., 2011). The business system inter alia includes offerings (products or services that are valued by customers), platform (using common components to create derivative offerings), customers (discover unmet customers), presence (channel of distribution adopted by a company to deliver offerings to the market or places where the customers can readily obtain these), network (a network that links the company and its products and services to the customers) and brand (the creative ways of communicating promise of a company to the customers) (Sawhney et al., 2011).
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Implementation of Code of Ethics among Quantity Surveying Firms in Nigeria

Implementation of Code of Ethics among Quantity Surveying Firms in Nigeria

This study set out to assess the implementation of code of ethics among quantity surveying firms in Nigeria. Using a survey design, practicing quantity surveyors in quantity surveying firms in Lagos state were sampled. The study has come to a logical conclusion that there is high level of awareness of code of ethics but not all the assessed quantity surveying firms have implemented it in their day to day activities. This non-implementation of code of ethics among some quantity surveying firms is as a result of some factors which include; inadequate remuneration for services rendered, present economic condition within the country and pressure from project team members. The implementation of the code of ethics will however lead to high performance in the discharge of Quantity surveyors professional duties/obligation, professional responsibility and integrity. The most occurring unethical practice among QS is insincerity to clients and other professionals. This and all other unethical practices such as bribery, colluding with contractors during the course of construction and revealing of official details such as tender figures and the likes can be curbed with strict enforcement of the profession’s code of ethics.
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BIM Vs Traditional Quantity Surveying And Its Future Mapping

BIM Vs Traditional Quantity Surveying And Its Future Mapping

Architects typically do not provide cost estimates on projects as part of their standard services, but the native capability of BIM to quantify and calculate is changing the nature of project deliverables for all participants. Conceptual or “top‐down” estimates are the first serious effort to predict the cost of a project and align decision‐making with those estimates. Project information at these early stages is usually general and at a high level (e.g. number of occupants, gross square feet area, and enclosed volume).Preliminary costing is generally based on templates from past project experience, or on standard square foot costs based on project type, region, or type of construction. Preliminary estimates, unlike those created during later stages, are prepared using concepts (e.g. “hospitals cost Rs x/sq. ft.” or “corporate space standards require x sq. ft. for this project”), and avoid counting of individual pieces.
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BIM IMPLEMENTATION IN A NEW ZEALAND CONSULTING QUANTITY SURVEYING PRACTICE

BIM IMPLEMENTATION IN A NEW ZEALAND CONSULTING QUANTITY SURVEYING PRACTICE

5D BIM - generating cost data via the building information modelling (BIM) process - has the potential to be used by quantity surveyors (QSs) to streamline their workflows and increase their provision of a quality service. Consultant QSs experienced in the use of 5D BIM, from the New Zealand office of a large global practice, were interviewed on their perceptions of the benefits of, and barriers to, 5D BIM implementation within their firm. Findings suggest that 5D BIM has numerous benefits over traditional methods, chiefly through the increased efficiency and visualisation that BIM provides, along with the rapid identification of design changes. However, realisation of these perceived benefits is limited to date, due to several barriers hindering 5D BIM implementation: incomplete design and insufficient model object data in the BIM model; a lack of standards to facilitate electronic measurement; legal issues, and a lack of government support. Increasing 5D BIM implementation, in tandem with increasing use of collaborative project working through integrated project delivery, will, however, facilitate these benefits being achieved to a far greater extent in the future. Further research is recommended to identify the BIM skills which QSs will need in the future to reach the full potential of 5D BIM.
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An insight into knowledge sharing practices in quantity surveying firms in Malaysia

An insight into knowledge sharing practices in quantity surveying firms in Malaysia

knowledge which resides in the brains and bodily skills of the individual”. It involves all the knowledge possessed by the individual that can be applied independently to specific types of tasks and problems. Lam (2000) also added that individuals have cognitive limits in terms of storing and processing information. Individual knowledge tends to be specialized and domain specific in nature. Polanyi (1958) emphasized that tacit knowledge can be generally understood as the form of knowledge that exists within an individual, and is intuitive and unarticulated. Tacit knowledge has been conceptualized by a myriad of academics from differing perspectives. According to Collins (1995) there are three types of tacit knowledge that present challenges to the epistemological concerns of management. Firstly, embodied knowledge describes a type of knowledge that is a function of the physical environment. It cannot be easily transferred from one brain to another. Secondly, embrained knowledge describes a type of knowledge that is specified by the exclusive physicality of an individual brain. Finally, encultured knowledge describes a type of knowledge that is embedded within a social context and cannot exist apart from it. Nonaka and Takeuchi (1995) argued that organizations cannot create knowledge without individuals, and unless individual knowledge is shared with other individuals and groups, the knowledge is likely to have limited impact on organizational effectiveness. Thus, knowledge is created through the interaction between individuals at various levels in the organization. KNOWLEDGE AND QUANTITY SURVEYING (QS) FIRMS According to Carr-Saunders (1966) a profession may perhaps be defined as an occupation based upon specialized intellectual study and training, the purpose of which is to supply a skilled service or advice to others for a definite fee or salary. Similarly, QS firms are knowledge-intensive organizations that provide expert advice and professional knowledge to clients (Løwendahl, 2000). The organizational assets reside in the experience and knowledge of staff, rather than in plant and equipment. There are four essential characteristics of QS firms (Fong and Choi, 2009).
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Barriers to the incorporation of BIM into quantity surveying undergraduate curriculum in the Nigerian universities

Barriers to the incorporation of BIM into quantity surveying undergraduate curriculum in the Nigerian universities

In the United States, Sacks and Pikas (2013) indicated that very few of the universities have incorporated BIM content into their AEC curricula. Some of these universities include Auburn University, Philadelphia University, University of Washington, University of Arkansas at Little, University of Southern California, Montana State University, and Purdue University. Other countries like Australia, New Zealand, and Hong Kong have also dealt with the integration process of BIM into AEC curricula in some of their universities. Therefore, it is evident that a number of universities worldwide are offering courses for various BIM applications within AEC programmes, while several others are under the process of integrating BIM into their curricula. In Nigeria, however, adoption of BIM concept in universities AEC curricula is a relatively new effort and studies on the status of BIM implementation in universities are not very common. For instance, similar previous studies include Babatunde et al. (2018) that focused on the drivers and benefits of BIM incorporation into quantity surveying profession in Nigeria. The study found that understanding the BIM is compulsory for quantity surveying and incorporation of BIM into the quantity surveying profession would make the quantity surveyors perform their practices better in a sustainable manner. However, the study does not pay attention to the factors preventing the Nigerian universities from incorporating BIM into their AEC curricula unlike some universities in the developed countries. It is on this premise that this study becomes imperative with a view to identifying and examining the barriers to the incorporation of BIM into AEC curricula, in this case for quantity surveying undergraduate curriculum in the Nigerian Universities. The findings of this study would be of great value to academic staff and university management boards to develop practices for incorporating BIM concept into the QS curriculum in Nigeria and developing countries at large.
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Heritage conservation education for tertiary level in Malaysia: Coalesce in quantity surveying programs

Heritage conservation education for tertiary level in Malaysia: Coalesce in quantity surveying programs

Table 5 shows result for ability to work in multidisciplinary groups for the quantity-surveying students. 64.3% agreed that students should have the ability to work in multidisciplinary team or group. 3.6% disagree and 32.1% are neutral about this issue. This is parallel with findings by (Orbaşli & Whitbourn, 2002), that conservation is a multi-faceted and multi-disciplinary process. That finding supported by statement given by (Suntikul & Jachna, 2013), different stakeholders bring different perspectives, knowledge and expertise to the conservation process, which can allow heritage development to be grounded in a more holistic understanding of its potential effects and constraints, opportunities and threats, and to draw on a much broader and multivalent base of knowledge and experience. Conservation of historic buildings and sites involve a wide range of professions from architects, surveyors, engineers, building surveyors, archaeologists, historians, town planners, landscape architects, as well as management professionals and etc. Each of these professional not only makes a contribution to the field of conservation, but also incorporates some features into the knowledge base of their own professional bodies. Therefore the students should be exposed from an early stage in the integration of professionals in the programs. 5. CONCLUSION
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Assessment of Knowledge Management Practices in Quantity Surveying Firms in Lagos and Abuja, Nigeria

Assessment of Knowledge Management Practices in Quantity Surveying Firms in Lagos and Abuja, Nigeria

The accessible population for the study is from the list of registered quantity surveying firms from the Nigeria Institute of Quantity Surveyors (NIQS) which indicates that 74 quantity surveying firms are registered in Lagos as at January 2012 while 52 are registered in Abuja as at June 2012 having a total of 126 firms where questionnaires was administered to one quantity surveyor per firm. The interview was carried out personally with some quantity surveyors in QS firms in Lagos and Abuja who were willing to participate. Of the 126 questionnaires administered, 68 questionnaires were completed and returned by the respondents representing 53.97% return rate This is considered sufficient for the study considering thatSaunders, Lewis and Thornhill (1997) considers the interval of 30-50 per cent to be a reasonable response rate for delivery and collection of questionnaires. 55.88% of respondents were from Lagos while 44.12% were from Abuja. A total of 13 interviewees responded to the interview. Computer aided statistical analysis was deployed in the data analysis process. All data collected by the questionnaires were input into SPSS 17 (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) in defined format. This program allows great flexibility and versatility in data processing and is widely adopted in statistical researches. This was used for finding the mean item score and the rankings of the factors. The formulated hypothesis was also tested using Spearman's Rank Correlation. Spearman's Rank Correlation is a technique used to show whether any one set of numbers has any relationship with another set of numbers. This was carried out to check the influence of firm size and experience of quantity surveyors on knowledge management activities. The Cronbach’s alpha was used to test the reliability of the questionnaire. The cronbach’s alpha values for scales of measures of the research instrument ranged from 0.860 to 0.894. Since the degree of reliability of the instrument is more perfect as the value tends towards 1.0 (Moser and Kalton, 1999), it can then be concluded that the instruments used for this research are significantly reliable.
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Part 2: Architecture, Quantity Surveying and Construction Management and Urban and Regional Planning

Part 2: Architecture, Quantity Surveying and Construction Management and Urban and Regional Planning

Applications for admission to the BArchStud programme, on the prescribed application form, must reach the Registrar, Academic Student Services, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, on or before 31 May of the year before intended admission. The selection procedure takes place before admission, (dates on request). The candidate needed to have applied for admission beforehand. Students will be notified of the results not later than January. A student, already registered for a programme at the University of the Free State, who wishes to change to the BArchStud-programme, must contact and supply the department with a national senior certificate before 31 May of the year before intended admission.
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Information Technology (IT) for Strategy Formulation in Irish Quantity Surveying Firms: A Literature Review

Information Technology (IT) for Strategy Formulation in Irish Quantity Surveying Firms: A Literature Review

and IT. The CPSF component of the IT for strategy influenced internal factors within QS practices, which comprised of knowledge intensity; uniqueness in terms of service delivery and client relationship. Other internal factors, which the strategist should consider, include core competences of professionals; the nature of clients; dynamic capabilities; and IT investments. In spite of the huge influences of the environment on CPSFs, QS practitioners seldom conduct environmental analysis. In this regard, the IT for strategy framework in figure 1 critically examines key issues in which contemporary businesses are operating, including QS practices. The factors of environmental turbulence within the ambit of the IT for strategy in QS practices consist of globalization; increased competition; macroeconomic changes; market uncertainties and demanding clients. It is necessary for QS practices to critically analyse these turbulent environmental factors in their pursuit of formulating strategy for competitive advantage in a dynamic market, mostly influenced by unpredictable technological changes. Considering the technological dynamism occurring globally, IT remains the most effective tool for keeping business performance afloat. In this regard, IT for strategy formulation should consider IT factors likely to influence the delivery of core businesses to clients. Within the domain of the IT for strategy, key technological factors for consideration by QS practitioners include automation; business process reengineering; technology integration; sustainability of IT and provision of value-added services to clients using IT infrastructure. It is apparent that an effective coordination and integration into IT for strategy of QS practices will create competitive advantage.
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Appraisal of the Perception of Quantity Surveying Profession by Non-allied construction professionals in Nigeria

Appraisal of the Perception of Quantity Surveying Profession by Non-allied construction professionals in Nigeria

A Quantity Surveyor is a professional in the built environment that has the training and ability to analyze cost components and practical physical construction works of a project in a successful way so as to solve the problem peculiar to each project ( Nnadi, Okeke & Alintah-Abel, 2016; Badu & Amaoh, 2004). The estimates and costing of Olding days magnificent construction in the ancient Egyptian civilization were done through diligent and dedicated personnel (Nnadi, Okeke and Alintah-Abel, 2016). Different countries addresses and called Quantity surveyors different names, to some; cost experts, cost engineers, construction economists, cost managers, building accountants, etc and many writers have used these different names in different research (RICS, 1991; Seeley, 1997; Seeley and Winfield, 1999; Kelly and Male, 2006) and in Nigerian authors has followed suit (Ajanlekoko, 2004; NIQS, 2004; Ogunsemi, 2004; Babalola, 2006; Odeyinka, 2006; Ogunsemi, 2006; Oke, 2006; Oke, Timothy and Aje, 2010). In all of these writers, “quantity surveyors” is the most common name for this professional in Nigeria. Quantity surveyor according to Oke, Timothy & Olaniyi (2010) is “a professional trained, qualified, and experienced in handling construction cost, construction management and construction communication on behalf of the client”. We cannot talk about an appraisal of awareness of a profession without looking at the historical background of such vocation first. This we enable one to know or have a
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Practitioner’s involvement in teaching & learning for quantity surveying course: student’s perspective

Practitioner’s involvement in teaching & learning for quantity surveying course: student’s perspective

Therefore, this paper is intended to get feedback on the practitioner based teaching model for the Quantity Surveying course. The aim is achieved by identify the needs of practitioner’s involvement in teaching and learning and by gathering views from students on the involvement of practitioner in teaching and learning.This study is focused within Malaysia’s public university that offers bachelor of quantity surveying program only which is University of Malaya (UM).

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