Medical education. Medical schools. Research

Top PDF Medical education. Medical schools. Research:

Medical education on fitness to drive : a survey of all UK medical schools

Medical education on fitness to drive : a survey of all UK medical schools

The websites of each medical school were used to identify staff with a senior managerial or coordinating role within medical education. These personnel were contacted in order to determine the most appropriate person to inter- view regarding the school curriculum. Potential interviewees were then telephoned to either con- duct the short interview there and then or to arrange a suitable time for future interview. Telephone interviews were conducted by research- ers (NG and VdS) using the questionnaire. Questions were mostly open ended and intervie- wees were asked to expand on their answers where appropriate.
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Medical education departments: a study of four medical schools in Sub-Saharan Africa

Medical education departments: a study of four medical schools in Sub-Saharan Africa

Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with the heads or directors of the four medical education departments using a structured interview protocol developed by the study group. An inductive approach to analysis of the interview transcripts was adopted as the texts were subjected to thematic content analysis. Results: Medical education departments, also known as units or centers, were established for a range of reasons including: to support curriculum review, to provide faculty development in Health Professions Education, and to improve scholarship in learning and teaching. The reporting structures of these departments differ in terms of composition and staff numbers. Though the functions of departments do vary, all focus on improving the quality of health professions education. External and internal funding, where available, as well as educational innovations were key enablers for these departments. Challenges included establishing and maintaining the legitimacy of the department, staffing the departments with qualified individuals, and navigating dependence on external funding. All departments seek to expand the scope of their services by offering higher degrees in HPE, providing assistance to other universities in this domain, and developing and maintaining a medical education research agenda. Conclusions: The establishment of medical education departments in Sub-Saharan Africa is a strategy medical schools can employ to improve the quality of health professions education. The creation of communities of practice such as has been done by the MEPI project is a good way to expand the network of medical education departments in the region enabling the sharing of lessons learned across the continent.
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Evolutionary Biology in Medical Education: Survey of North American Medical Schools

Evolutionary Biology in Medical Education: Survey of North American Medical Schools

All analyses were performed using JMP version 9.0.2 (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC). Global coverage among groups was compared by t-test or analysis of variance. Characteristics of responding schools were compared with the total population of 153 using chi-squared tests. Correlations between mean curricular coverage of evolu- tion topics and factors potentially influencing coverage were assessed by Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. Potential influences included the mean importance of the topics, curriculum hours devoted to evolution topics, curriculum hours devoted to teaching how to apply these topics to medical problems, number of faculty with a Ph.D. in evolution, number of faculty whose research is based in evolutionary biology, presence of a student club or interest group in evolutionary medicine, antici- pated controversy of adding evolution content to the curriculum, and general medical school characteristics. Acceptable Type I error (α) was set at 0.05 without ad- justment for multiple comparisons.
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Challenges with Regard to Undergraduate Medical Education in Offshore Caribbean Medical Schools

Challenges with Regard to Undergraduate Medical Education in Offshore Caribbean Medical Schools

There are fewer opportunities for professional growth and development. As the number of faculty is less, faculty members are busy teaching during most of the working week. The quality of faculty development activities varies across schools. Accreditation requirements are pushing schools toward offering some degree of faculty development and training. Most islands and schools have acceptable access through the internet to a large number of learning resources. Webinars are becoming an important means of faculty development. Many faculty members are also enrolled in fellowships and Masters programs offered by the Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research (FAIMER) and other agencies. The regional accreditation agency, Caribbean Accreditation Authority for education in Medicine and other Health Professions (CAAM-HP) also periodically offers opportunities for faculty interaction and knowledge/skill development (5].
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WFME Standards for Educational Programmes: Tutors Perceptions in Pakistan

WFME Standards for Educational Programmes: Tutors Perceptions in Pakistan

Introduction: Medical education has seen enormous transformation worldwide in recent decades. There have been concerns that doctors from South East Asia (SEA) are not adequately trained to meet healthcare challenges of the day . This study was designed to find the status of ‘Educational Programmes’ in public medical schools in Pakistan compared to World Federation for Medical Education (WFME) basic standards using tutors’ perspectives. Method: This was a non-interventional, questionnaire- based research. Questionnaires were sent to 326 tutors from 19 of a total of 23 public medical colleges in Pakistan. The response rate was 54%. Results: We found the medical education system to be compliant with WFME Basic Standards in four subareas of Area 2- Educational Programmes. These were ‘Scientific Foundation’, ‘Role of Basic Biomedical Sciences’, ‘Behavioural and Social Sciences and Medical Ethics’ and ‘Role of Clinical Sciences and Skills’. The system was found partially compliant with WFME minimum standards in two subareas of Area 2, namely, ‘Curriculum Models & Instructional Methods’ and ‘Curriculum Structure, Composition and Duration’ but non-compliant in two subareas of Area 2, namely, ‘Programme Management’ and ‘Linkage with medical practice and Health System’. Conclusions: The study provides a level of understanding of the standards of medical education in Pakistan on a national level. Studies with potential of digging deeper, probably backed with better resources than ours will be required to have a comprehensive understanding of the medical education system in Pakistan.
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Medical education in Israel 2016: five medical schools in a period of transition

Medical education in Israel 2016: five medical schools in a period of transition

Tecnology in 1973. The Faculty includes a School of Postgraduate Medical Sciences whose MSc and PhD candidates are actively involved with faculty researchers in ongoing scientific and medical research. Special pro- grams for outstanding students combining multidiscip- linary education and research include MD-PhD and MD-Engineering programs, as well as the MD-Law pro- gram in collaboration with the University of Haifa. In addition, the faculty grants a BSc in laboratory medicine and collaborates with the University of Haifa in the Oc- cupational Therapy Program. The Faculty staff is com- prised of 450 educators, including 45 preclinical scientists. The student body is comprised of roughly 635 Israeli medical students (115 admitted in 2015-6 for the first year class, with about 15 additional students joining later in the program, either after completing a BSc or returning from 3 years of studying medicine abroad, thus 128 students graduated in 2016), 165 foreign stu- dents in an English-language program, and 200 graduate Medical Sciences students.
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THE PEDIATRICIAN AND THE PUBLIC

THE PEDIATRICIAN AND THE PUBLIC

the educational programs in clinical medicine, I believe medical schools can best serve in their primary function of education and research, if they are not forced to accept an extension[r]

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Evaluation of the medical student research programme in Norwegian medical schools. A survey of students and supervisors

Evaluation of the medical student research programme in Norwegian medical schools. A survey of students and supervisors

The Medical Students Research Programme is a national initiative to increase the recruitment, and thus the propor- tion, of researchers with a standard medical degree within all medical fields. The results of the survey show that all the main fields of medical research have been included in the new population of fresh researchers; in fact the spread is probably better than before. In addition, the recruit- ment of researchers at student level has several advantages compared to the recruitment of graduate medical doctors. The students are already in an established education situ- ation where motivation, financing and family relation- ships are favourable to research. The financial aspect in particular has been emphasised as a factor which limits the recruitment of doctors into research. The costs of grants to Medical Students Research Programme are con- siderably lower than for ordinary grants, at the same time as the students get full grant cover and do not have to take out additional student loans. Socio-economically it also makes sense to educate doctors to become competent researchers at an early stage as their professional careers will be that much longer. The Medical Students Research Programmes also carry out active recruitment work which may be used both in the faculties' own and in the national research strategy – both in terms of strengthening existing research environments and of developing new areas of research.
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Medical Research Education in Europe

Medical Research Education in Europe

Independent, international evaluation panels may play a useful role in systematically assessing the output of medical research programmes and identifying areas of improvement. International research organisations could support these accountability exercises by sharing best practices for merit review or ensuring research integrity. MD-PhD candidates and their supervisors must also play an active role in ensuring the highest quality of this process and its outcomes. Supervision must be a collective effort at doctoral schools, with clearly defined responsibilities for all stakeholders in medical research education. The role of faculty must be explicitly acknowl- edged and appraised, for these are the teachers, mentors and role models for future generations of MD-PhDs. Institutions must provide doctoral supervisors with pro- fessional development tools and opportunities.
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The medical schools outcomes database project: Australian medical student characteristics

The medical schools outcomes database project: Australian medical student characteristics

There have been relatively few comprehensive studies which have been longitudinal encompassing the national continuum of medical school education, early postgradu- ate experience (internship or pre-registration), and voca- tional training. In particular, some of the key medical workforce studies [9-13] provide only a ‘snapshot’ view of various programs but are seldom as effective in asses- sing long-term outcomes. At the time of this report, the MSOD project already has recruited over 30,635 re- sponses from Australian medical students and trainees who are being surveyed prospectively (Table 2), mak- ing the project one the largest longitudinally tracked cohorts of medical students in any single research project globally.
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PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS

PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS

standards of pediatric education in medical schools and hospitals, in pediatric practice, and in research;.. to maintain the dignity and efficiency of pediatric practice in its relations[r]

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Global health education in U.S. Medical schools

Global health education in U.S. Medical schools

While ethical engagement is understood by most as an important need, the related issue of reciprocity often comes up. This is particularly relevant to medicine for two reasons. First, while heeding the dictum of primum non nocere (L. first do no harm ) is essential, it is but the bare minimum. Simply doing no harm does not excuse us from the need to actually do good. Second, unlike counterparts in public health who regularly engage with developing countries while conducting research and training programs, clinical medicine has many fewer examples of sustainable medical partnership programs. As medical professionals engage further with global health and with counterparts in public health, there is an opportunity for shared learning.
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Friendship or vicarious relationship? Exploring the intricacies faced  by basic sciences in integrated curricula

Friendship or vicarious relationship? Exploring the intricacies faced by basic sciences in integrated curricula

In response to the evolving needs and reports on medical education, many medical schools have been pursuing curricular integration. Contrary to Abraham Flexner who persuaded that teaching of medical sciences, from basic to clinical, should be a critical component of the discipline based curriculum, ‘integration’, in its purest sense unifies separate areas of knowledge which quenches the needs of adult learners. However, most medical schools struggle with integrating their curricula owing to the confusion derived from diverse definitions and multiple learning theories. A common criticism of integrated curriculum is that students will not see the relevance of basic sciences and this significantly minimizes the role of basic sciences in medical education. The crux of integration is achieving the balance of clinical and basic sciences in a manner that best serves the student to maximize student engagement and knowledge retention. In this paper, we made an attempt to address the contextual issues existing in medical schools, the changing role of basic sciences in present day medical education and the optimal strategy to achieve effective integration of basic sciences. We propose that a dynamic interconnectedness happening at various levels is more important to achieve effective integration rather than mere deliberate unification of individual disciplines.
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Medical education research in GCC countries

Medical education research in GCC countries

(v) lack of an academic recognition in promotions and hir- ing. Moreover, medical educationists are focusing more in biomedical and clinical research rather than in medical education. Our findings are in agreement to the results of Khalid bin Abdulrehman [12] that Saudi Arabia contrib- uted enough number of research publications in bio- medical sciences in ISI-web of science journals, however, in medical education Saudi Arabia produced very little 323 (0.79%) research papers in ISI web of science and in medical education the Hirsch index (h-index) of Saudi Arabia is 14. In the present study, we took one step for- ward to the study of Khalid bin Abdulrehman [12], they gathered the research publications based on pub med database, however, in the this study, the source of infor- mation is ISI-web of science, a more reliable and valid source of science bibliometric indicators.
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The utilization of peer feedback during collaborative learning in undergraduate medical education: a systematic review

The utilization of peer feedback during collaborative learning in undergraduate medical education: a systematic review

The objectives of this systematic review were to deter- mine the role peer feedback plays in student learning and professional development, ascertain the impact peer feedback might have on team dynamics and success, and learn if and how the quality of peer feedback is assessed. Our review highlights the heterogeneity of the current literature regarding the use of peer feedback in under- graduate medical education. Overall, peer feedback in a collaborative learning environment may be a reliable assessment for professionalism and aid in the develop- ment of professional behavior. Many studies felt that peer feedback was appropriate to use in a formative manner. Most studies do not address the importance of the quality of peer feedback provided by students. Due to the wide variations in the outcomes defined by these studies, it may be beneficial to have more standardized definitions for student learning, team-dynamics, and professionalism. Despite the large variety of contexts and outcomes studied, there seems to be a consistent message. Peer feedback in collaborative learning is feas- ible and may be useful. Steps to ensure success include training faculty and students on peer feedback methods and purpose. Because developing and implementing peer feedback systems takes significant energy and resources, further studies should increase in methodologic report- ing rigor and seek to expand outcomes to include, but not be limited to, quality of peer feedback (including the effectiveness of providing faculty and student training), the effect on academic performance, institutional cul- ture, and benefits to future employers and patients.
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“Men’s health – a little in the shadow”: a formative evaluation of medical curriculum enhancement with men’s health teaching and learning

“Men’s health – a little in the shadow”: a formative evaluation of medical curriculum enhancement with men’s health teaching and learning

The perceived window of opportunity provided by the current medical curriculum restructure in many univer- sities, as they move to graduate courses, may add to the momentum to improve men’s health teaching in Austra- lian medical schools. However, our findings suggest that the standing of men’s health in the community may be a bigger barrier to adopting enhanced men’s health training for medical students than apparent disinterest within medical schools. Australia is one of only two countries in the world to have defined a men’s health policy [9, 29], despite many countries recognising the need [30]. In Australia, some changes are evident, with increased com- munity awareness of men’s health issues such as prostate cancer, testosterone supplementation, erectile dysfunction, social isolation and domestic violence. It is vital that the current and future medical workforce is appropriately trained to respond to the changing external environment and population health needs.
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Sleep medicine education and knowledge among medical students in selected Saudi Medical Schools

Sleep medicine education and knowledge among medical students in selected Saudi Medical Schools

A major challenge for the future is encouraging the educational system at all levels to acknowledge the high prevalence and serious consequences of sleep disorders. The curricula of modern medical schools must address a substantial amount of scientific and clinical material in a limited time. Therefore, it is difficult to devote a block for sleep and sleep disorder education. Harding et al. proposed alternative methods to integrate sleep topics into existing curriculum blocks [29]. The suggested ap- proaches included integrating basic sleep science topics into the problem-based curricula of the preclinical years (such as physiology, neuroanatomy and neuroscience), integrating sleep history and physical signs into intro- ductory clinical medicine and integrating sleep disorders into problem-solving sessions. These same researchers proposed the following measures for the clinical years: including sleep topics in the clinical rotations (such as internal medicine, psychiatry, family medicine and neur- ology), using computer-based simulations for different sleep disorders [30] and allowing students to take elect- ive courses in sleep medicine clinics [29]. In addition, it is important to cover sleep-related material in qualifying exams, which will encourage the inclusion of sleep medi- cine in medical education and competency-based learning [17]. The above can be implemented in Saudi medical schools as most medical schools use the problem-based learning strategy.
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Scholarly publishing and research dissemination in South Asia: some exemplary initiatives and the way forward

Scholarly publishing and research dissemination in South Asia: some exemplary initiatives and the way forward

dissemination and to provide space to the regional journals, the Korean Association of Medical Journal Editors has launched and supported the KoreaMed Synapse database (https://www.synapse.koreamed.org/), a local database. ScienceCentral (a Journal Article Tag Suite (JATS)-based full-text database compatible with PubMed Central; http://www.e-sciencecentral.org/), is operated by the Korean Federation of Science and Technology (KOFST). The KPubS (http://www.kpubs.org) is an OA journal platform initiated by the Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information. Other such examples come from China and Japan in the shape of China Open Access Journals (http://www.oaj.cas.cn) operated by the Chinese Academy of Sciences and J- STAGE (https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp) operated by the Japan Science & Technology Agency, respectively. 11 In
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Research and Professional Education in Emergency Medical Services

Research and Professional Education in Emergency Medical Services

EMS work environment is characterized by high levels of stress, concerns about personal safety, irregular working hours, rigorous training, limited professional mobility and poor compensation [2, 5]. Paramedics are exposed to various occupational hazards, which includes contact with body fluids from disaster scenes, risk of falling objects and exposure to violence [2]. A combination of these factors makes EMS one of the careers with lowest staff retention rates. The challenging working environment has over the years been attributed to playing a significant role in undermining establishment of a learning culture in the EMS [1]. This research study sought to investigate the number of scholarly research studies published in paramedics and EMS.
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The geographic and topical landscape of medical education research

The geographic and topical landscape of medical education research

listed affiliations of first authors [3, 4]. PubMed papers have expert-tagged hierarchical medical subject heading (MeSH) terms that can be used to specifically filter search results by field of study. However, PubMed records them- selves have not been used in previous studies of the geog- raphy of MER productivity. Instead, the GoPubMed semantic search engine [5] has been used for prior work [2, 6]. GoPubMed matches papers with similar text to pa- pers that bear a given MeSH term, but it does not limit search results only to papers tagged with a given MeSH term or its subheadings. Though it is a powerful tool for search, a large percentage of GoPubMed search results for the “Education, Medical” MeSH term are actually papers from other fields that do not bear this specific MeSH term. As a result, it is difficult to conclude that these pre- vious studies were, in fact, drawing from a body of litera- ture representative of the MER field.
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