music and childhood

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Music, movement and drama in early childhood education: an assesment of the moi university case

Music, movement and drama in early childhood education: an assesment of the moi university case

Childhood, 1999). According to MENC, the National Association for Music Education (2010), music is a natural and important part of young children's growth and development. Early interaction with music positively affects the quality of all children's lives. Successful experiences in music help all children bond emotionally and intellectually with others through creative expression in song, rhythmic movement, and listening experiences. Music in early childhood creates a foundation upon which future music learning is built. These experiences should be integrated within the daily routine and play of children. In this way, enduring attitudes regarding the joy of music making and sharing are developed. According to Connors (2009), when one listens to the singing, the laughing, and the shouting; the jumping, stomping, and clapping... children making music, it’s easy to hear they’re having fun. Children, unlike adults, learn primarily through sound. They naturally focus attention more easily on sound than on visual stimuli. The rhythmic sound of music, in particular, captures and holds children’s attention like nothing else, and makes it a valuable learning tool. Music education increases children’s intelligence, academic success, social skills, and even physical fitness.
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children and music: musical education and childhood studies in dialogue

children and music: musical education and childhood studies in dialogue

Children and music are the theme of this article conceived as a sort of rehearsal, with the aim of thinking a musical education of childhood. Its theoretical foundations emerge from conversations between music education and childhood studies, and formed the basis for the lecture workshop held at the II Congress of Childhood Studies, in September 2019, at the University of the State of Rio de Janeiro. The text addresses methodological openings present in creative approaches to curricula based on network formats and circles. Improvisations and compositions made by children and guided by professor-artists who know their craft, emerge from these experimental dynamics. The participation of children in collaborative action with their teachers gives, in turn, new meanings to the teacher’s role in the form of “double listening”—listening both to children and to their musical expressions. The development of research in children’s music has powerful implications both for musical education and for the field of education. This research also contributes to childhood studies, since listening to children's musical expressions makes it possible to know more about what they think, feel and do when they create their music. It also
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to be listening: music and teaching in early childhood education

to be listening: music and teaching in early childhood education

The essay brings together studies around the poetic dimension of language in order to address the relationship between teaching young children and the listening experience as an aesthetic manner of coexisting in the world. This approximation between philosophy, arts and early childhood education begins with the meeting between music and education, and assumes that what we listen to is the sound that meaning makes, and not the meaning of a sound as an object of interpretation. Our text is inspired by Jean-Luc Nancy, who affirms that the sonorous invokes the sensible, and does so in a constant movement that never finishes producing a meaning. As such, it resists the privilege of the optical model in western theory. Nancy's Being in Listening associates resonance with the sound that the senses make deep in the body. Music as an interplay between sound and noise, as a poetic production, and a resonant organization of sensibility, encourages infants and young children to play with the sonorities of the world, and to live the poetics of noise as a form of empowerment. Children's appetite for the sonorous signifies a hunger for the deeply felt experience--the aesthesia-- of listening to the world in the plurality of coexistence. The gesture of listening with babies and young children is an educational one, which points to the world-constitutive experience of the resonances and reverberations of meaning that inhabit the sonorous. In listening with children, we are imbricated in sound, and experience ourselves as sharing in a sensible, polyphonic ground of voices, signs, gestures, forms and sensibilities, which act to situate us as being- with each other in the world.
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Learning centres in primary and early childhood music education

Learning centres in primary and early childhood music education

Response to the statement ‘the learning centre helped me to learn about problem-solving…’ from the 39 Year 5/6 respondents were less positive with just 6 respondents (15.4%) responding ‘a lot’, 15 respondents (38.5%) responding ‘a little’ and 18 respondents (46.2%) responding ‘not so much’, hence 84.7% of participants responded either ‘not so much’ or ‘a little’. In the open-ended aspect of this question there were some ten responses that stated they had learned ‘nothing’ about problem solving through the centre task. This fi nding confi rms research in the area of problem solving in music education with senior primary students in Tasmania (Elliott, 2007) in which students’ perceptions of a problem solving task in music education were explored. This study found that student perceptions of the term ‘problem solving’ were mostly linked to the mathematics domain and that many students were unsure of how the notion of problem solving translated into a musical context.
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Nondestructive Evaluation Of Corrosion Damage In Reinforced Concrete Aged Slab Specimen

Nondestructive Evaluation Of Corrosion Damage In Reinforced Concrete Aged Slab Specimen

Physical setting. Bright Horizons at USC was an early childhood development center on the University of South Carolina (USC) campus in Columbia, South Carolina. Bright Horizons teachers used an emergent, child-centered curriculum, called The World at their Fingertips (“Bright Horizons,” 2017). Within an emergent curriculum, an adult planned lessons based upon the interests and developmental abilities of the children by observing, crafting lessons, and asking guided questions to increase the children’s learning and development. The teachers created learning opportunities based on each child’s interests, providing intentional guidance and rich experiences that build upon the child’s individual strengths and talents (“Bright Horizons,” 2017). The center provided services for children ages six weeks to four years. Bright Horizons at USC included approximately 180 children from a variety of ethnic, linguistic, and socioeconomic backgrounds. The children were grouped into classes according to age: infants (6 weeks to 12 months), toddlers (13 months to 23 months), 2-year-olds, 3-year-olds, 4-year-olds, and PreK 4-year-olds. Though the children in any given class had similar ages and general developmental abilities, their music development abilities may have varied greatly.
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Nondestructive Evaluation Of Corrosion Damage In Reinforced Concrete Aged Slab Specimen

Nondestructive Evaluation Of Corrosion Damage In Reinforced Concrete Aged Slab Specimen

play facilitator using guided music play. During this study, I learned valuable information about children’s play behaviors, roles, and music as well as my play behaviors, roles, and music. I gained insight into how the children and I played together and how the children and I engaged in playful music activities together. The 2-year-old children often initiated, sustained, and modified pretend play when we engaged in social music interactions. Though I might be considered the more knowledgeable person with regard to music knowledge and skills, the 2-year-old children added depth to our music engagements through their emerging pretend play. They engaged me in their pretend play while I playfully engaged them in unstructured and structured informal music guidance to enhance their music development and learning. Early childhood music development specialists may gain understanding of the importance of social music interaction by shifting from the role of music teacher to the roles of observer, initiator, sustainer, and modifier as music play facilitators by integrating children’s pretend play requests and responding to children’s music.
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Delta State University Department of Music Spring 2009 Volume 6, Issue 2

Delta State University Department of Music Spring 2009 Volume 6, Issue 2

Felicia Keenum May, BME (Saxophone) ’95 and John May, BME (Percussion) ’93; MME ’95 live in Carrollton, TX, just outside of Dallas. Felicia received her Master of Music Education degree from the University of North Texas in 2000. She is Director of Bands at Lake Dallas Middle School, where she has been for 8 ½ years. Felicia has also performed with the Lone Star Wind Orchestra. She has been married to John May since 1997 who currently teaches band at North Garland High School, where he is an assistant band director and percussion coordinator. John has finished the course work toward a Ph.D. in Music Education from the University of North Texas and has also performed with the Lone Star Wind Orchestra. He has been published in the July and November 2007 Instrumentalist, and more recently in the January 2008 Newslink, an online MENC publication.
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Music Notes , I wrote that students of music are making decisions to attend DSU based not on just the

Music Notes , I wrote that students of music are making decisions to attend DSU based not on just the

Jennifer Lungrin Milner (BME 2000) is the music specialist at South Pontotoc Elementary where she produces an annual program in each grade K- 5. She also leads the Cougar Cub Choir, which has received superior marks at competitions and is invited frequently to perform in and around the area. Jennifer is now a National Board Music Educator. She has enrolled in the Master’s of Music Education program at the University of Mississippi. Jennifer is the new MS ACDA Children's Choir Repertoire and Standards Chair, the Vice-President of the MS AOSA Chapter, and is active with MMEA. This year, 5 of her students were selected for the Southern Division ACDA Children's Honor Choir in Memphis in March. Another 3 of her students will be participating in the annual MMEA All-State Elementary Honor Choir in Jackson in April. She is coaching eleven junior high and high school ladies that were selected to participate in Treble Song, an annual all women's honor choir held in Jackson in February. Shelia & Ashley Miquez (BME 2000) are living in Brandon MS. Sheila teaches elementary music at Pinelake Christian School and private voice at Crossgates School of Fine Arts. Since both of her jobs are part time, Sheila is able to be home at least one day a week with their three beautiful children. Ashley works full time at Ross & Yerger Insurance Agency. He also teaches private guitar and piano lessons at Crossgates School of Fine Arts. Ashley and Sheila attend Pinelake church where Sheila sings in the adult choir and directs the middle school choir. Ashley helps with a ministry in Canton, MS which ministers to low income Hispanic people. Shelia says, “We are living life full of smiles. I played outside today with my cute little baby and our new puppy! It can't get much better than that.”
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Delta State University Department of Music Spring 2011 Volume 8, Issue 2

Delta State University Department of Music Spring 2011 Volume 8, Issue 2

Dr. Richard Waters, Associate Professor of Music, spent February 3-5 as a guest artist on the campus of High Point University (NC). While there, he worked with the university choirs in preparation for their March performance at Carnegie Hall and presented a lecture titled “The Roles of a Conductor” to the Beginning Conducting class. The weekend culminated with a winter concert, including the world premiere of Dr. Waters’ new composition, “Give Me Your Stars To Hold,” which was composed for the HPU choirs and their director, Dr. Marc Ashley Foster. Another composition, “Sleep, Sleep, Beauty Bright” (version for SSA choir), was recently selected for publication by Colla Voce Music. The piece was premiered in the fall by Sa Belle Chant from Hernando Middle School, under the direction of DSU alumnus J. Reese Norris. Dr. Waters will direct The Mississippi Chorus, the Mississippi Boychoir, and the Holmes Community College Choir in a performance of Carl Orff’s “Carmina Burana” on Saturday, April 30, at 7:30 p.m. in the Ridgeland High School Auditorium.
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Delta State University Department of Music Spring 2007 Volume 4, Issue 2

Delta State University Department of Music Spring 2007 Volume 4, Issue 2

Dr. Bahr’s final performance at Delta State University prior to retirement in May, will be a performance of Lars-Erik Larsson’s Concertino for Trombone, Op. 45, No. 7, in the Delta State University Wind Ensemble Concert on April 24. Dr. Donna Banks was invited to speak at a fundraiser planned by the Nashville Area Music Teachers Association to benefit the members of the Mississippi Gulf Coast Music Teachers Association who were affected by the hurricane. The group raised over $7,000 in cash and presented a

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Delta State University Department of Music Spring 2012 Volume 9, Issue 2

Delta State University Department of Music Spring 2012 Volume 9, Issue 2

It is important to note that these efforts often have to be “self-supporting” financially. Gifts made to our foundation accounts help to make it possible for these exciting activities to continue, as well as funding several scholarships, such as the Jeff Ross Capwell scholarship for outstanding instrumental music education majors. If you feel inspired to be a part of these efforts, please consider making a donation to our department by contacting our office. You also can simply send your gift to the music office and we'll make the proper arrangements with the foundation. You can give by credit card at the DSU web site, www.deltastate.edu. There's an icon of an open hand on every web page that connects you to the DSU Foundation. Make sure to “comment” that your gift is directed to music department account(s). All gifts are greatly appreciated.
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Alumni Awards 2011

Alumni Awards 2011

Adding to this outstanding faculty, I take great pleasure in announcing four new appointments to the DSU Department of Music while wishing Drs. Bradford, Meerdink, Waters, and Wojcik the best of luck in their new endeavors. New to our department are Mr. Josh Armstrong, Assistant Director of Bands and percussion instructor; Mr. Nicholaus Cummins, Director of Choral Activities; Mr. Joe Moore, Director of Bands; and Dr. Chad Payton, countertenor and Assistant Professor of Music. They are a very accomplished and congenial group of young men who will ably build on the successes of their talented predecessors. I also want to congratulate Dr. Kumiko Shimizu, faculty collaborative pianist, on her promotion to Associate Professor with tenure status. It is well-deserved.
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Dr. Shelley Collins was appointed Assistant Professor of Flute at Delta State

Dr. Shelley Collins was appointed Assistant Professor of Flute at Delta State

As chair of the DSU Special Programs Committee, he spearheaded the first Arts in April celebration on campus, which focused on excellence in student artwork and performance, and included guest performances, lectures and an outdoor spontaneous multimedia event. Dr. Butler continues to serve as chair of this committee as well as on the Teacher Education Council, representing the College of Arts and Sciences. He is currently the Past President of the Mississippi Alliance for Arts Education. Dr. Andrea Cheeseman, Assistant Professor of Woodwinds, attended a 5-day workshop at Ithaca College, The Healthy Musician: Injury Prevention and Intervention. Designed for physical therapists and music professors, the course focused on basic anatomy, the stresses musicians put on their bodies when they perform and methods of relieving muscular tension when playing. Also covered was Neuro- Linguistic Programming and its application in teaching music courses and private lessons. Feldenkrais and Brain Gym, two methods that focus on methods of improving concentration and performance through the use of movement and body awareness, were also discussed in detail.
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Music Notes Delta State University Department of Music Fall 2012 Volume 10, Issue 1

Music Notes Delta State University Department of Music Fall 2012 Volume 10, Issue 1

“What? Why? How? When?” ...these are the questions that the Department of Music faculty are pondering about our program in order to assess the comprehensiveness of our degrees, the adequacy of our facilities, and goals for the future. This is a result of working on a “self-study” required every 10 years by our accrediting agency, the National Association of Schools of Music (NASM). The study will result in a document by which on-site evaluators from other universities will look into the same questions and offer their observations next February. NASM requires broad standards for accredited schools that are to be interpreted locally to ensure that graduates are adequately prepared inside of a set of common parameters. An important component of the self-study is strategic planning for the next five to ten years, giving us the chance to identify improvements, build on existing successes, and commit to different strategies and frameworks of instruction. It is also a chance to project how to best attract and retain qualified majors, respond to shifting trends and mandates, and to analyze our effectiveness, all guided by the accepted accreditation standards embedded in the overall structure.
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Student Handbook 2009-2010

Student Handbook 2009-2010

The Bachelor of Music Education degree may also prepare a music major to be a church musician, where a musician would most likely rehearse choirs and small instrumental ensembles, conduct, and develop the musicianship skills of children and adults involved in the church’s music program. The B.M.E often requires more than four years to complete all requirements depending on electives, number of ensembles, and other personal factors. However, a candidate can complete the requirements of the degree program in eight semesters.

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The relationship between attitudes towards music and achievement

The relationship between attitudes towards music and achievement

Although it may be agreeable that attitude contributes to achievement, it does seem true to say there are other factors that may influence this relationship. Perhaps this is due to the complexity associated with achievement as a concept. Martim (1980) points out that School Achievement is a Multidimensional concept that is determined by many factors. These vary from the child's social and economic background, his mental ability, and school environment that ranges from facilities to the kind of teachers present. It is indeed difficult to verify the actual attributes of achievement. However his inference points out to the fact that achievement is a function of the learner and environment. Bentley (1966), speaking on Musical Ability, supports this view by the following remarking that nature and nurture, inherited talent and development within the environment, are not entirely independent. Makobi (1985), writing on factors affecting Music Education, identifies a number of factors that may influence learning. These include teacher's uncertainty in his competence to cope with requirements of the Music Syllabus in addition to the lack of required facilities. These examples imply that attitude may be a contributory factor to achievement but it is one among many others. That attitude is related to achievement is therefore not refutable, though the statistical margin is not significantly large. This paper reveals that a relationship exists between attitude towards Music and achievement. This was obtained through the correlation between attitude scores on the attitude rating scale administered to pupils and their achievement scores from the end of year music assessment. The Spearman Rank Order Correlation Coefficient was used to determine the correlation. Although the coefficient obviously reflects a low correlation, nevertheless, it pointed out positively in as far as attitude and achievement are concerned. In summary, the attitude rating scale which was administered to standard seven pupils was aimed at revealing the most prevalent attitudes towards Music. Through it, the researcher also aimed at establishing whether a relationship did exist between pupils’ attitude towards Music and their achievement. Findings in the study can be summarized through the following points:
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Depression Among Pregnant Latinas In South Carolina

Depression Among Pregnant Latinas In South Carolina

participants were affiliated with the Children’s Center at the University of South Carolina and all data were collected at that site. I served as a complete participant observer for this study. Other participants included 17 three-old-children from Class 3B at the Children’s Center, six of whom I selected as information-rich cases, Class 3B lead teacher, assistant teacher, and a music development specialist. Additionally, a research assistant provided logistical assistance by video recording each music play session with a Zoom Q2HD Handy Video Recorder. Data included videos of the six music play sessions, my field notes and reflections, the lead teacher’s field notes, audio recordings of the think-aloud interviews from the lead teacher, assistant teacher, and music development specialist, and their written responses to a researcher-developed, open-ended questionnaire. Following are detailed descriptions and rationales of the locale, participants, data, and analysis.
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Music: Its Language, History, and Culture

Music: Its Language, History, and Culture

The details of Haydn’s early life are sketchy. He was born in an Austrian village and came from a humble background. At about the age of eight he was chosen to join the choir of one of Vienna’s most important cathedrals. After his voice changed, he supported himself by teaching and working as a freelance performer, then at the age of 29, entered the service of a wealthy and powerful Hungarian aristocratic family, the Esterhazys. Music was a central component of life at the Esterhazy estate in the Hungarian countryside and the household staff included orchestral musicians, opera singers, and a chapel choir. Haydn’s contract specified that he was responsible to provide music as required by the prince, care for the musicians and instruments, and conduct himself “as befits an honest house officer in a princely court.” For 30 years Haydn lived and worked at the Esterhazy palace, largely isolated from what was happening elsewhere. As he himself recalled, “My prince was content with all my works, I received approval, I could, as head of an orchestra, make experiments, observe what created an impression, and what weakened it, thus improving, adding to, cutting away, and running risks. I was set apart from the world, there was nobody in my vicinity to confuse and annoy me in my course, and so I had to become original.” With the succession of a new Esterhazy prince in 1790, Haydn’s life took a new direction. Although he continued to earn a salary, he was no longer required to live at the Esterhazy estate. He moved back to Vienna, one of the musical capitals of the time, where he met and befriended Mozart and for several years was the teacher of the young Beethoven. He also accepted invitations for two lengthy trips to London, for which he composed a number of important new works. In London, performances devoted to his music, including 12 brilliant new symphonies, were highlights of the concert season. He appeared before the royal family, was sought after as a guest at social occasions, and was awarded an honorary doctorate from Oxford University. In Vienna, where his monumental oratorios The Creation and The Seasons were enthusiastically received, he was named an honorary citizen. At his death at the age of 77, Haydn had become one of Europe’s most celebrated figures.
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The Global Omnivore: Identifying Musical Taste Groups in Austria, England, Israel and Serbia

The Global Omnivore: Identifying Musical Taste Groups in Austria, England, Israel and Serbia

Secondly, the selected national musical scenes espouse different combinations of foreign cultural influences. Austria has a significant musical legacy: in addition to preserving a strong folk tradition, it is considered by many to be the European capital of western classical music. However, tensions exist here between supporters of traditional folk, schlager and volkstumliche folk-pop ballads, American- and British-influenced rock and hip-hop, and hybrid world music (Reitsamer, 2012). England features widely in the literature on culture and social stratification. Nowadays, tensions are evident between young people with a preference for popular emerging styles such as urban music, as opposed to the more traditional tastes of country and western, world music, and classical of the more adult population (Savage, 2006; Savage and Gayo, 2011). Israel has been greatly influenced by its international diaspora, religious traditions and musical forms. Songs of the land of Israel (broadly recognised as mainstream folk music) and western-influenced pop/rock are massively popular in Israel (Regev, 2000). However, Middle Eastern music, originating from the Arab and Islamic musical traditions, has been largely excluded from the local music mainstream (Regev, 2000). Despite the fact Serbia was until 1990 part of a communist state, it has maintained its highly diverse and popular folk expressions mixed with the latest global music. Historically, old-town folk, ancient musical expressions, and traditional folk are highly popular among Serbians, alongside rock and dance music (Cvetičanin, 2008). During the 1990s in Serbia, rock took a critical stance against the post- socialist regime (Mijatovic, 2008), while dance evolved into turbo-folk (electronic music with its roots in folk), emulating the lifestyle of the nineties new elite (Kronja, 2004).
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2011 MARCHING BAND HANDBOOK

2011 MARCHING BAND HANDBOOK

The DSU Marching Band is a highly visible performing ensemble – participation at all rehearsals and performances is mandatory. Because of the inherent nature of ensemble classes, the grading system is different from other academic classes. Each member starts with a grade of “A”. If a member follows all prescribed guidelines and meets all expectation, he or she will receive a final grade of “A” for the course at the conclusion of the semester. However, if a member does not follow the guidelines and expectations as outlined in this handbook, he / she will have his / her final grade lowered. Grading is determined by your preparation, positive contribution, and attendance. Preparation refers to rehearsals and performances and includes, but it not limited to: music execution (may be demonstrated via a formal music check), drill execution, possession of appropriate and required materials (proper shoes, instrument, drill, music, flip folder, etc…), proper wearing of the uniform, instrument upkeep, and knowledge and adherence to DSU Band policies and procedures. A positive contribution to rehearsals and performances includes, but is not limited to: the demonstration of a positive attitude, strong work ethic, and team-oriented demeanor. Attendance includes both rehearsals and performances.
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