Music Education, Music Therapy

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Performing Identities, Performing Possibilities: A Music-Centered and Relational Perspective on Performance in Community Music Therapy and Music Education

Performing Identities, Performing Possibilities: A Music-Centered and Relational Perspective on Performance in Community Music Therapy and Music Education

participation because their musics are not seen as valuable by the dominant culture (Green, 2012; Small, 1998). Noting the social privilege required to secure the training and musician identity necessary to become a music therapist or music educator (Gonzalez, 2010; Zubrzycki, 2015) it is no wonder that professionals within these disciplines are disproportionately White (AMTA, 2011; Bradley, 2007; Elpus, 2015; Hess, 2017, 2018). In turn, this contributes to a colonial agenda within schools of music, where particular musics are reproduced—thereby validating particular students—and many others are omitted (Bradley, 2007). Race scholars recognize that race is a social construction, performed, not unlike Butler’s notion of gender (Koza, 2008). Whiteness, then, as a “dominant ideology”, is “reinscribe[d]… through superficial engagement with diversity and through failing to engage discourses of race and power” (Hess, 2017, “Interrupting What?”, para. 5). I acknowledge this ideology’s troubling impact upon music education, music therapy, and our clients and students, and recognize that our disciplines must continue to engage critically and reflexively with these themes. Participants in my research were largely Caucasian,
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UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY PROGRAM ASSESSMENT PLAN Master of Music in Music Therapy

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY PROGRAM ASSESSMENT PLAN Master of Music in Music Therapy

2.3. Other Assessment Resources: Assessment oversight for the music therapy program will be the responsibility of the Director of Music Therapy in conjunction with the Division Coordinator for Music Education and Music Therapy. Should further review be needed, the School of Music Assessment Committee will be consulted. 3. Program-Level Learning Outcomes

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Georgia College and State University Milledgeville, GA

Georgia College and State University Milledgeville, GA

Master of Arts in Teaching, Master of Fine Arts, Master of Science, Master of Science in Criminal Justice, Master of Music Education, Master of Music Therapy, Master of Accountancy, Master of Business Administration, Master of Arts, Master of Public Administration, Master of Science in Nursing, Master of Education, Master of Science Administration, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management, Master of Management Information Systems

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Five Phases Music Therapy (FPMT) in Chinese Medicine: Fundamentals and Application

Five Phases Music Therapy (FPMT) in Chinese Medicine: Fundamentals and Application

Pattern is the diagnostic result from clinical data assessed by looking, smelling and listening, asking, and palpation. After the pattern of an illness is determined, treatment principle and specific modalities e.g. herbal remedy, acupuncture, diet, Qigong, music can be applied (Fang et al., 2013). Among the methods of analyzing pattern, Zang-fu Bian Zhen or Pattern Differentiation plays the most important role in clinical practice. Based on the relationship of the five scales and five Zang-organs, music is composed or selected according to its nature. For example, when the liver Qi is injured by an excessive anger and the symptoms, such as bitter taste in mouth, red eyes, rib-side pain, irritability, insomnia, irregular menstruation etc. are present, Jue Music should be used. The relationship of the music scales and organs was showed in figure 1. Besides, if the patient shows the same symptoms and patterns but not resulting from the emotional disorder, music therapy is also effective.
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Music Therapy in the Treatment of Eating Disorders. Dean Quick, MT-BC. Program Director and Board Certified Music Therapist at TranscendED

Music Therapy in the Treatment of Eating Disorders. Dean Quick, MT-BC. Program Director and Board Certified Music Therapist at TranscendED

People often say that music is their therapy. For music to have such a positive impact on the lives of others is refreshing for me. It sometimes can be difficult for individuals to differentiate between music enhancing a mood they have and clinical music therapy. This is one of the reasons for me contributing and writing this 3-part series on music therapy in recovery of eating disorders. It is my goal that at the end of this series, you will have a better understanding of what music therapy is, how it is effective with this population while experiencing eating disorder symptoms, and how effective music can be to promote and engage in recovery. For part one, I will share a brief history of music therapy, where music therapists work, and what differentiates music therapy from music listening.
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FAVORITE SONGS AND MUSIC ACTIVITIES FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS AND THEIR STUDENTS

FAVORITE SONGS AND MUSIC ACTIVITIES FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS AND THEIR STUDENTS

Elementary music curriculum specialist, Granite School District Elementary music field consultant, Utah State Offrce of Education SUSAN KENNEY.. Elementary music education, Associa[r]

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Improving understanding of music therapy with a non verbal child: sharing perceptions with other professionals : a research presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Master of Music Therapy at New Zealand School of Music, Wellington, New

Improving understanding of music therapy with a non verbal child: sharing perceptions with other professionals : a research presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Master of Music Therapy at New Zealand School of Music, Wellington, New Zealand

M: hm…I, myself use mixture of verbal and nonverbal languages when I’m in the room with clients. But if I use verbal language… I do that to give very short instructions quite often within a song… umm… sometimes directing as acknowledging. For example; instructions “you are playing the drum”. I’m actually verbalising out loud… what’s happening in the room; because I’m not certain what they understand and what their perceptions are. I think it is important to acknowledge that I recognise what they are doing, how they are interacting. Oh! I also use it in an inviting way …language such as; “Will you come and play the drum?” and often again that’s within song. So it’s inviting. And even if … umm… even if they don’t fully understand the actual language and the ordering of the words umm.. I feel that through me using actual verbal sentences they will hear the question hopefully in my voice because of the melodic infection umm.. and they also hear me as a warm person as well… and you know; very much wanting to play with them … umm… and…. However, there are obviously quite long periods of time when I’m not speaking at all and I’m just concentrating on physically playing myself and including them…or I might be engaging with them or I might be vocalising umm… the melody along side what they’re playing. And again, my intention in that is number one to provide another musical element and melody to support and extend what we’re doing or… again, just to express my own present within the music and express any sort of emotional qualities that I’ve picked up… that gets reinforced as well. Y: hm… okay. Thank you! So ummm… I’m going to show you the first video clip. And every video clip takes approximately 2 minutes. The first clip you will see Harrison and I share the floor tom together. These three clips are from between session 25 and session 30. You will be asked some questions after.
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PHILLIP AND PATRICIA FROST SCHOOL OF MUSIC - UNDERGRADUATE INTRODUCTION MISSION

PHILLIP AND PATRICIA FROST SCHOOL OF MUSIC - UNDERGRADUATE INTRODUCTION MISSION

The mission of the Studio Music and Jazz Performance Program is to: (1) prepare jazz instrumentalists to enter the music profession or graduate school; (2) identify, recruit, and retain high quality students who seek to pursue studio/jazz performance as a career; (3) foster faculty creativity and performance which serves as a role model for students; (4) develop, and revise courses in jazz improvisation, jazz arranging/composition and provide on and off campus performance opportunities; (5) produce in our on campus facility, recordings for the Down Beat Student Music Awards, compact disks, radio and Internet broadcast; and (6) provide a platform of learning that includes performance, composition/arranging, technology, conducting, scholarship and production.
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PHILLIP AND PATRICIA FROST SCHOOL OF MUSIC - UNDERGRADUATE

PHILLIP AND PATRICIA FROST SCHOOL OF MUSIC - UNDERGRADUATE

The Bachelor of Music in Composition is designed to (1) provide students with a learning environment conducive to the pursuit, fostering, development, and exchange of ideas and information, particularly as it pertains to music composition, production, and performance; (2) to provide student access varied composition communities; (3) to continue to build upon the Frost School of Music's reputation as an innovative, forward-thinking, and first-rate center for advanced study; and (4) to maintain the highest educational, professional, and ethical standards. Goals of the program are (1) to provide students with training to be fluent in basic compositional skills; (2) to help students understand various directions that available to composers in the 21st century; and (3) to help students perform, produce, or realize their music.
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QUALITATIVE INQUIRIES IN MUSIC THERAPY: A MONOGRAPH SERIES

QUALITATIVE INQUIRIES IN MUSIC THERAPY: A MONOGRAPH SERIES

Laura Beer presents a study of the experiences of Asian students who came to the US to study music therapy. In her arts-based study, she engaged participants in multiple reflective steps about their experiences as students. Beer describes in clear detail the many challenges, both internal and external, that these students face. This study is noteworthy for its inclusion of recordings made by the students during the study, and like Bolger’s study, for its detailed descriptions of epistemology and methodology.

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Fundamentals of organization and trends of academic professional music education in the Ukraine

Fundamentals of organization and trends of academic professional music education in the Ukraine

2. practical mastering of a musical instrument – chromatic sopilka, which promotes the development of musical memory, hearing, coordination of body movements and a child’s acquaintance with the world of musical art via simple music structures. Thus, to a certain degree the Kotyuk Concept follows in the footsteps of the Kodai and Suzuki Method. There is even a peculiar parallel between the practical implementation of the Kotyuk Concept and the activities of Dmitryi Kabalevsky at school. Indeed, in the Soviet era, the role and significance of the Composers’ Union (CU) of the USSR was very significant. D. Kabalevsky, a composer and board member of the USSR (CU), worked in a general education school in order to implement his concept. Bohdan Kotyuk, a mem­ ber of the USSR (CU) from 1985, went along the same path (as if mirroring Kabalevsky). This unprecedented case in the history of Ukrainian schooling, when a professional composer comes to work at a secondary school in order to implement his Concept of Musical Upbringing of School Children, has no analogies.
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ASSESSMENT IN THE SECONDARY MUSIC CLASSROOM

ASSESSMENT IN THE SECONDARY MUSIC CLASSROOM

This can be taken a stage further, too. If assessment results are going to be published nationally and enable comparison of a specific school with other schools, then the management team of the school is also likely to want to monitor the way the music teacher has taught the class the performance piece, in order to maximize the school’s position. In some countries, publication of such grades enables newspapers to print “league tables” of schools classified by the results from summative assessments. This aspect of assessment raises issues of accountability, and assessment data used in this way can cause problems for music teachers. Indeed, there is a danger that in some countries externalized assessment becomes a means whereby the content can be determined centrally: “State standards reflect value choices about what is most important for students to learn and what constitutes mastery of that knowledge. But different constituencies have different ideas . . .” (Colwell, 2007, p. 6). This is an important observation, and is key to understanding different local and national contexts concerning assessment. What this can result in is known as “teaching to the test,” and occurs where high-stakes assessment systems place considerable weight on assessment results. This can result in a narrowing of the curriculum, and of learning opportunities, as teaching becomes focused solely on final assessment; this is known as “assessment backwash.”
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Interaction within the therapeutic relationship : exploring the relationship between the music therapy practices of a music therapy student and the concepts used in intensive interaction : an exegesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements fo

Interaction within the therapeutic relationship : exploring the relationship between the music therapy practices of a music therapy student and the concepts used in intensive interaction : an exegesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Music Therapy, Te Kōkī New Zealand School of Music, Wellington, New Zealand

Intensive Interaction is a naturalistic approach to communication (Caldwell, 2006; Graham, 2004; Hepting & Goldstein, 1996; Nind, 1996, 1999; Nind & Hewett, 1994) that seems to have parallel characteristics with various models of music therapy. During an Intensive Interaction ‘conversation’ the practitioner ‘tunes in’ using the intervention of imitation as a point of reference, to the client’s body language, facial expression and vocal sounds (Caldwell, 2006) just as a music therapist tunes in or becomes attuned to the client by using techniques of empathy (for example imitation or matching) within an improvisational music therapy approach to elicit a musical response. Brown, when discussing the imitation of or reinforcement of autistic behaviours (2002, cited in Bunt and Hoskyns, 2002) refers to Stern’s ‘affect attunement’ where, during an interaction between caregiver and infant, that which is being matched is not the exact behaviour but an aspect of it that reflects the child’s mood at the time. Matching, imitation or ‘ modified reflecting back’ as it is referred to by Nind and Hewett (2005) is about capturing an aspect of the person’s behaviour and celebrating that response with that person in a naturalistic way. By noticing a sound, or movement or a facial expression and giggling or laughing in response to your own attempt at reflecting back creates an atmosphere of informality and light-heartedness. To remain humble and socially connected with that person will ensure the fundamental importance of mutual involvement and mutual pleasure (Nind, 1996) is adhered to during an interactive ‘conversation’.
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Music education

Music education

Finally, special mention should be made of the pivotal role of local authority-based instru- mental teaching in Scotland. While the design of the curriculum was based on opening access to all pupils who wish to study Music, there can be no doubt that the support of peri- patetic instrumental staff , who are usually responsible for delivering small-group instruc- tion within a cognate instrumental family (such as woodwind), is vital. Such provision caters for pupils who wish to pursue the development of advanced skills that would simply be impossible within the classroom setting, and who lack the fi nancial resources to access private instrumental tuition. Current threats to the funding of such services pose very real challenges to the continued high-quality provision of Music.
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Music education

Music education

Paynter and Aston (1970), Witkin (1974) and in the USA since the 1960s (Choksy et al., 1986) and placed them into a Scottish context. This provided the impetus for a root and branch overhaul of the curriculum which would reshape music in the classroom into an action-based experience, open to all children, regardless of their musical or academic ability. In the contexts of both primary and secondary schools, Curriculum Paper 16 recommended syllabus content and teaching and learning strategies, the review of assessment approaches and most significantly, staffing, resource and accommodation requirements to enable ‘music for all’ to be implemented. These recommendations gave teachers and headteachers the tools and impetus to make demands on local authorities to fund the developments appropriately.
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AEC Annual Meeting. for International Relations Coordinators. Aalborg 27 September Parallel Sessions. Silvio Luigi Feliciani

AEC Annual Meeting. for International Relations Coordinators. Aalborg 27 September Parallel Sessions. Silvio Luigi Feliciani

Silvio Luigi Feliciani.. THE BACHELOR DEGREEE PROGRAM IN THE MUSIC THERAPY COURSE OF THE CONSERVATOIRE OF MUSIC IN PESCARA.. 80.[r]

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THE RHYTHMS OF LIFE: MUSIC THERAPY FOR THE BODY, MIND AND SOUL

THE RHYTHMS OF LIFE: MUSIC THERAPY FOR THE BODY, MIND AND SOUL

The system has to be put to use with pure scientific and clinical approach and should be applied only after an in depth study of the nature and symptoms of the disease. It is heavily based on the correct intonation and the judicious use of the different basic elements of music like rhythm, volume, beats frequency, and piece of melody. Effectiveness of Music Therapy: Lisa M Gallagher, a music therapist working in the Cleveland music school settlement says that their study clearly shows that music improves mood while decreasing pain, anxiety, depression, and even shortness of breath among seriously ill patients. A study was conducted between 2000and 2002 with about two hundred subjects from across the world. The subjects selected were from a variety of phases of life and suffering from different illness including non cancerous tumors, pain disorders, sickle cell diseases, aortic aneurism, gardener’s syndrome, AIDS, neuro degenerative diseases, and a long list of other so called life limiting diagnoses.
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The efficacy of music interventions on pain in cancer patients undergoing therapeutic treatment

The efficacy of music interventions on pain in cancer patients undergoing therapeutic treatment

have shown the analgesic effect of music listening that cognitively and emotionally influence the patients by distraction from the pain, anxiety, memory evoked emotions and relaxation (Mitchell, Macdonald and Brodie, 2006; Juslin and Västfjäll, 2008; Wiech and Tracey, 2009; Bernatzky, Presch, Anderson and Panksepp, 2011; Salimpoor, Benovoy, Larcher, Dagher and Zatorre, 2011). Kwekkeboom (2003) compared the effects of music therapy and routine nursing care on pain in hospitalized patients and discovered that participants did not prefer usingthe headsets because it interfere withhearingthe instruction of doctors, and it leads to more anxiety. As anxiety and pain have direct effect on each other, it is better to don’t use headset for patients. According to Frank (1985); Ezzone, Baker, Rosselet and Terepka (1998) and Bozcuk et al. (2006) music is useful to lessen treatment side effects such as pain in oncology patients. Mitchell et al. (2006) found that music therapy effectively increased patients’ tolerance to pain and enhanced perceived control over pain. According to Akombo (2006) and Clark et al. (2006) music can be used as an intervention to increase pain management in cancer patients and they found that music therapy resulted in greater pain reduction than standard routine care. Clark et al. (2006) analyzed a subsequent analysis excluding his data resulted in a moderate effect of music on pain perception in 391 participants with cancer.
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Global music approach to persons with dementia: evidence and practice

Global music approach to persons with dementia: evidence and practice

AMT can be defined as an approach that involves making music with the PWD (individually or in small groups) based on theoretical and practical assumptions of both a psycho- logical and a neurocognitive nature. From the psychological point of view, AMT refers to relational therapeutic methods that may facilitate the processes of communication, expres- sion, and modulation/control of the emotional–affective aspects of dementia. With regards to AMT with a neurocog- nitive basis, the approach is oriented toward aspects that are related to cognitive rehabilitation and tries to support several functions such as memory, speech, and executive functions. During relational interventions, sound and music are mainly employed referring to improvisational techniques (generally in the nonverbal context), but also with the use of structured material (eg, well-known songs or melodies); in the rehabilitation approach, sound and music are used in specific musical tasks. AMT requires the presence of a trained music therapist who needs to have specific expertise at a musical, relational, and clinical level. The interventions take place within a therapeutic setting and imply adequate methods of evaluation of the processes and of the results produced by them. The studies referring to AMT 25,26,28,29,44–49
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Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Modulates Behavioral and Brain Responses to Social Stress

Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Modulates Behavioral and Brain Responses to Social Stress

therapy (PT), occupational therapy (OT), and speech therapy, even if the patient does not need it or would be better suited to receive music therapy or horseback riding. Beth speculates these therapies are covered while other are not because they had good lobbyist or “played the game better.” If we pay for the insurance, we should get to decide what is best for us. Jennifer emphasizes an example in Kentucky other states should follow. The University of Kentucky program covers music therapy in addition to PT, OT, and speech therapy. UK recognized the benefits of music therapy, and they saw it was less expensive by decreasing the need for more expensive therapies or pharmaceuticals. By presenting this data to Blue Cross Blue Shield, the insurance company for UK, they wrote music therapy into their plan, while BCBS in Georgia and other state plans do not cover music therapy. In fact, when Georgia’s state plan switched from United Healthcare to BCBS, there was a large decrease in insurance reimbursement for music therapy. Under Western biomedical models, access to funds revolves around hard data. Since it is difficult to statistically show psychological improvement, following the UK model is a good option. By proving to policymakers that music therapy is effective and less expensive than more “traditional therapies” using hard data, BCBS was convinced and the UK program rewrote its plan. Sarah agrees that hard data would help with funding and coverage. They are currently using data showing the benefits of music therapy to setup programs in hospital NCUs.
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