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New global learning cultures: Interdisciplinarity through networked technologies

New global learning cultures: Interdisciplinarity through networked technologies

UK H.Keegan@salford.ac.uk Abstract The context in which higher education institutions (HEIs) now operate is facing fundamental changes; HEIs are often said to be in a time of crisis, and new models of education are being explored both within and outside the academy. The rise of open educational resources and practices and alternative forms of accreditation are gaining recognition as learners and educators explore new ways of learning and connecting both within and outside the institution. Simultaneous to this rise in new learning cultures and paradigms, traditional disciplinary boundaries are themselves being challenged as networked technologies and changing social/cultural conditions are leading to further critique of traditional pedagogies, and increasing support for interdisciplinarity. In this paper, we explore emerging and converging technologies and disciplines through two higher education international collaboration scenarios. These two projects illustrate the potential of interdisciplinary communities of practice to nurture and support new pedagogical paradigms. We conclude by identifying five design principles for global interdisciplinary projects.
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New networked technologies and carers of people with dementia : an interview study

New networked technologies and carers of people with dementia : an interview study

The interview schedule covered socio-demographic attributes, the role of the carer, views on technology in general, and attitudes towards and use of new technologies including specific tools such as the internet and mobile telephones. The participants were also asked to comment on five vignettes that illustrated applications of networked technologies : remote monitoring such as movement sensors that send alerts to distant carers or cameras and can be watched using internet or mobile telephone platforms ; ‘ smart home ’ technologies, namely devices that automatically switch off water or gas taps or can incorporate intelligent systems that recognise changes in usual behaviour ; internet health information websites ; online medical con- sultations ; and peer support accessed by means of Web 2.0 online social networking sites (see Table 1). The majority of the interviews took place in the participant’s homes, with one at the university and one at a library. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed with written in- formed consent. We acknowledged the time and expertise of participating carers by giving shopping vouchers (£10 per interview).
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New global learning cultures: Interdisciplinarity through networked technologies

New global learning cultures: Interdisciplinarity through networked technologies

The context in which higher education institutions (HEIs) now operate is facing fundamental changes; HEIs are often said to be in a time of crisis, and new models of education are being explored both within and outside the academy. The rise of open educational resources and practices and alternative forms of accreditation are gaining recognition as learners and educators explore new ways of learning and connecting both within and outside the institution. Simultaneous to this rise in new learning cultures and paradigms, traditional disciplinary boundaries are themselves being challenged as networked technologies and changing social/cultural conditions are leading to further critique of traditional pedagogies, and increasing support for interdisciplinarity. In this paper, we explore emerging and converging technologies and disciplines through two higher education international collaboration scenarios. These two projects illustrate the potential of interdisciplinary communities of practice to nurture and support new pedagogical paradigms. We conclude by identifying five design principles for global interdisciplinary projects.
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The Role of Digital Networked Technologies in the Ukrainian Orange Revolution

The Role of Digital Networked Technologies in the Ukrainian Orange Revolution

While online citizen and professional journalists used the Internet to create a very effective alternative media environment to challenge the Kuchma regime, civil society activists were[r]

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Repacking ‘privacy’ for a networked world

Repacking ‘privacy’ for a networked world

A concern with privacy is not new in CSCW and related areas of HCI and Ubiquitous Computing, where it is seen as a matter of primary concern driven by both the immediate and foreseeable impact of networked technologies, particularly ‘ ubiquitous ’ or ‘ pervasive ’ (mobile, location and sensing-based) technologies, on interaction. Running alongside this is a marked concern with the impact of social media on privacy, and challenges occasioned by increased online data harvesting (e.g., consumer analytics). Both of these technological threads lead to a pronounced interest in providing ‘ users ’ with enhanced control mechanisms to manage the fl ow of personal data in the digital economy and thereby protect their privacy. However, the empirical study presented here of digital privacy practices in the home suggests that within a domestic context at least people are more concerned with relationship management than they are with privacy per se. Thus we find a concern among the participants in our study with managing cohort-dependent risks, the accountability of action, and the manifold ‘intrusions’ into everyday life occasioned by their interac- tions in and with the networked world. These efforts at relationship management suggest that managing the potential ‘ attack surface ’ of the digital on everyday life is a primary concern to household members, and we explicate a range of fi ne-grained methods members have devised and employ to do this. Traditionally the notion of attack surfaces is associated with considerations of security, but in our studies participants did not distinguish strongly between matters falling under the rubric of ‘security’ and matters falling under the rubric of ‘privacy’ (such distinctions would appear to matter more to designers than members). Furthermore, on closer inspec- tion, we fi nd that for members the invocation of ‘ privacy ’ itself glosses a heteroge- neous array of local practices for managing human relationships in and with the networked world. The upshot for design is that there is need to complement a concern with technological privacy mechanisms for controlling the flow of personal data with the development of relationship mechanisms that enable ‘ users ’ to manage their relationships in and with the networked world. This, we suggest, is key to building trust in and fostering engagement with the digital economy.
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2 Organizing for Networked Information Technologies

2 Organizing for Networked Information Technologies

Instrumental in this transition is the pervasive emergence of complex, standard- based, and networked technologies. Examples of such technologies are the Internet, Intranet, Extranet, Electronic Data Interchange (EDI), and Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems. Each of these offers new possibilities for extensive business process reengineering of the enterprise, but also posses a significant threat if left unattended.

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How do technologies support School Direct students' learning on a PGCE with Qualified Teacher Status within a Networked Learning Model

How do technologies support School Direct students' learning on a PGCE with Qualified Teacher Status within a Networked Learning Model

122 acts as a driver for students and mentors to reduce the transactional distance between them as much as possible by adopting technologies that enable this. Transactional distance is described by Moore (1997 p22) as being a factor of the structure of the programme, the interactions between tutors and learners and the degree of self-directedness of the learner. While there are some, such as Wikeley and Muschamp (2004 p186) who have found that a tighter structure regarding the expectations of interactions led to an increased level of dialogue, it is generally assumed that a looser structure reduces transactional distance. The role of transactional distance was combined with teacher immediacy by Aragon (2003 p57) who found that they were both factors in establishing an effective online community. It would seem that frequent and regular interactions between mentors and students that make use of the rapid communications facilitated by SMS, combined with the high degree of self-directed learning that takes place on placements results in a low transactional distance. Whilst students engaged in widespread use of technologies to interact with their mentors, there were some limits to this, particularly when asking for ideas and advice. Students expressed how they didn’t wish to expose their professional ignorance to their mentors and so would often seek to use interactions with web-based artefacts to build their
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Building cities for the networked society

Building cities for the networked society

Ericsson has developed the Networked Society City Index to identify and measure the extent and development of ICT-enabled benefits to cities. The index helps illustrate how a multitude of stakeholders can work together to implement ICT strategies that address a city’s social, economic and environmental needs. Its framework assists city mayors, local authorities and decision-makers to measure and analyze their cities’ ICT maturity and the triple-bottom- line results of their ICT investments.

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The Advantages of a Networked File System

The Advantages of a Networked File System

Storage systems are typically governed by access-control policies, and the security of those systems depends on the sound enforcement of the necessary access-control checks. Unfortunately, both the policies and their enforcement can be surprisingly prob- lematic, for several reasons. In particular, the policies may be allowed to change over time, often via interactions with the file-system environment; it is then crucial to prevent unauthorized access-control administration, and to guarantee that authorized access- control administration has correct, prompt effects. Another source of substantial diffi- culties is distribution. In networked, distributed storage systems, file access is often not directly guarded by access-control checks. Instead, file access is guarded by the inspec- tion of capabilities; these capabilities certify that the relevant access-control checks have been done elsewhere in the past. Yet other difficulties result from the scale and complexity of systems, which present a challenge to consistent administration.
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Networked Storage Concepts and Protocols

Networked Storage Concepts and Protocols

Physical topology Logical topology Physical topology Fibre Channel switch Storage Sun server Windows server Switch GEN-000307... ◆ Number of ISLs between switches.[r]

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Networked Identities Understanding Relations. between Strong and Weak Ties in Networked. Environments

Networked Identities Understanding Relations. between Strong and Weak Ties in Networked. Environments

We would argue that we need to enhance our analytical focus on movements, flows and continua of activities across domains; rather than focusing on bounded spaces, separated contexts of activity, practices or singular, coherent communities (if those have ever existed). Not because of the web-trends, though we do see these trends as almost reifications or crystallisations of the network metaphor and the notion of networked individualism. However, it seems to us that socio-cultural learning theories in general are increasingly becoming interested in learning that happens not only in discrete contexts (such as a school class, a work place or an organisational unit), but rather in the learning that happens across and between these constellations (Engeström 1999; 2004, Dreier 2002; Lave 2002; Nielsen and Kvale 2002). This broader trend also ties nicely into the discussions revolving around the differences between the networked learning metaphor and CoP’s:
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INEFFICIENCIES IN NETWORKED MARKETS

INEFFICIENCIES IN NETWORKED MARKETS

new questions: How inefficient can these investments be? How can these inefficiencies be categorized? This requires new tools. To reveal agents’ incentives to invest in different links, we develop an algorithm that identifies how the structure of a networked market influences payoffs. To analyze the size of inefficiencies, we use the cost of anarchy and price of anarchy from the computer science literature and explore the bounds on ineffi- ciency across all stable networks. To investigate the size of different types of inefficiency, we define measures of overinvestment inefficiency and underinvestment inefficiency by adapting the cost of anarchy and price of anarchy to these specific types of inefficiency. We find that when investments are fixed and made separately, overinvestment is lim- ited but—except in a knife-edge case—underinvestment due to hold-up problems can eliminate all the gains from trade. In contrast, when buyers and sellers can negotiate their investment shares, underinvestment inefficiency is eliminated but overinvestment inefficiency can consume all the gains from trade.
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Electronic commerce and networked libraries

Electronic commerce and networked libraries

The customer orders online for purchase of a product or a book and also provides his/her credit card number and authorisation by way of password or by digital signature. However, as the message travels through many systems and networks, the system administrators, supervisors or even a hacker can intercept the mail and misuse the credit card number. More than 20,000 credit card numbers stored in a computer at an Internet Service Provider (ISP) were compromised by an intruder as early as 1995 (Loshin and Murphy, 1997). However the Secure Electronic Transaction (SET) initiative takes care of security electronic payments. SET is backed by Visa and Master cards with giants like Microsoft, IBM, Netscape Communications, Terisa Systems, VeriSign etc are assisting the project. Further public key and private key encryptions are used for sending payment details securely over networks. Some of the technologies including cryptography, digital watermarks and digital signatures for security of information over networks and multimedia works are discussed by the authors elsewhere (Lakshmana Moorthy and Karisiddappa, 1998(a) & 1998(c)).
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Hashing in Networked Systems

Hashing in Networked Systems

Hashing
in
Networked
Systems 
 COS
461:
Computer
Networks
 Spring
2011
 Mike
Freedman 
 h@p://www.cs.princeton.edu/courses/archive/spring11/cos461/
 Server
 Cluster
 Switches
... How
Aka[r]

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Piloting a Networked Curriculum

Piloting a Networked Curriculum

Results of the post-test for content knowledge suggests no appreciable loss in student learning when course content was moved online and time spent in the physical classroom was reduced. For the engagement survey, in all but one item, there were no statistically significant differences at the .05 level of significance between responses from students in the traditional version of the course and the networked curriculum version. For the one survey question where a difference at the p < .05 level did occur, students indicated that they were more engaged with content in the networked curriculum course than they were in the lecture style course.
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Networked Learning and Postdigital Education

Networked Learning and Postdigital Education

Learning community – The idea of the learning community is present in both definitions of networked learning and is considered a significant feature in the design of networked learning courses including for the MEd as described above. McConnell, (2006) describes a networked learning community as a cohesive community that embodies a culture of learning. The learning community is expected to attend to issues of climate, needs, resources, planning, action and evaluation. A key feature of such a learning community is that responsibility for learning is ‘shared’ among community members who all bring their own knowledge and skills to the community. However, as described in principle 2 above, power, age, gender, identity, socio-cultural norms, language, and discourse are all recognized as important dimensions and influences on the process and experience of taking and sharing of responsibility. It is not a case of simply incorporating group-work into a traditional teacher led course with predefined syllabus, aims and objectives. The learning outcomes are intended to emerge from the community. Participants and tutors alike collectively review, assess and evaluate their learning. Which in turn, as Alexander & Alexander (2018) recently commented, 1
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The Epistemic Practice of Networked Learning

The Epistemic Practice of Networked Learning

What do the above ideas and comments reveal about the position of networked learning in the current highly politicised, globalised and increasingly digitalised higher education sector? If nothing else, they show that the conference provides a community to examine and discuss the practical difficulties faced within HE. Arguably, they also demonstrate that the networked learning community of researchers not only reveal their epistemic beliefs in what they write but also in what they attempt to do in their practice – both as participants at the conference and in their own situated teaching and learning practices. It is a reiterative process of developing one’s own networked learning practice through the affordance of the NL conference and the conference’s own practical accomplishment of networked learning.
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BROADBAND 2030: The networked future

BROADBAND 2030: The networked future

We often think of broadband connectivity as a conduit to two types of devices — homebound machines like computers or appliances and mobile marvels like tablets and smartphones. But in the emerging networked ecosystem, everything will be connected. And that includes another place where we spend much of our time — in vehicles. Within 10 to 15 years, your car will be part of your connected personalized broadband world. Connected vehicles will enable safer operating, better fuel efficiency and more pleasant traveling environment for passengers with potential for these technologies to improve several aspects of existing transportation systems.
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Controllability, Observability in Networked Control

Controllability, Observability in Networked Control

Abstract: We reconsider and advance the analysis of structural properties (controllability and observ- ability) of a class of linear Networked Control Systems (NCSs). We model the NCS as a periodic system with limited communication where the non updated signals can either be held constant (the zero-order-hold case) or reset to zero. Periodicity is dealt using the lifting technique. We prove that a communication sequence that avoids particularly defined pathological sampling rates and updates each actuator signal only once is sufficient to preserve controllability (and observability for the dual problem of sensor scheduling). These sequences can be shorter than previously established and we set a tight lower bound to them.
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Networked Differential GPS Methods

Networked Differential GPS Methods

This thesis re-examines the concept of multi-beacon DGPS by evaluating methods of combining beacon corrections based on spatial relativity. Recent research determines that DGPS accuracy performance is biased: the mean scatter of DGPS-corrected po- sitions does not fall on the true receiver position. This finding was re-established this using networked DGPS methods both by processing GPS L1 C/A observables from dozens of CORS (Continuously Operating Reference Station) sites around the U.S.A. and via simulation using a Spirent GSS8000 GPS simulator. Specifically, we found that (a) the position solution computed using DGPS beacon corrections is typically biased in a direction away from the beacon and (b) the magnitude of the bias depends upon the distance from the beacon. This bias grows with a slope of approximately one-third of a meter per 100 km of user-to-beacon distance. We also found that networking DGPS corrections decreases the errors of bias magnitude and scatter radius inherent in single- beacon solutions.
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