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Socio-cultural invisibility and belonging: Latin American migrants in the north of England

Socio-cultural invisibility and belonging: Latin American migrants in the north of England

Most of the existing research on Latin Americans in the UK (or particular national groups from Central and South America) has been based in London where, as has been pointed out, the majority of the population resides (e.g. Bermudez, 2010; James, 2005; McIlwaine et al., 2011). In addition, and due to the relative recent history of significant Latin American migration to the UK, there are few studies on the experiences of children and young people from this group (e.g. McIlwaine et al., 2011). The project on which this article is based aimed to start addressing these gaps in research, by considering the experiences of incorporation of Latin Americans and their children in the north of England. The project was conducted in the Yorkshire and Greater Manchester regions in 2009-2010 with five Latin American and five Latino-British family case studies (including all the adults and dependent children between 8-18 years of age), totalling 30 participants. Participants were recruited through non-for-profit and commercial initiatives such as a grass-roots magazine for Spanish speakers, conversation circles, specific cultural groups (e.g. Chilean Community in South Yorkshire - SCDA), and professional enterprises promoting Latin American culture, music and dance. By using purposive sampling and snowballing techniques, I selected a set of families which illustrates a range of national origins, socio-economic backgrounds and migration trajectories.

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Prevalence of neurogenetic disorders in the North of England

Prevalence of neurogenetic disorders in the North of England

A systematic literature review was undertaken by searching PubMed (MEDLINE) listings from January 1966 to April 2015 for relevant articles using the following terms: “ataxia,” “neuropathy,” “muscle disease,” “myopathy,” “dystrophy,” “Huntington,” “mitochondrial,” “optic atrophy,” or “hereditary spastic paraparesis” combined with the terms “epidemiology,” “prevalence,” or “incidence.” There was no language restriction. The final reference list was generated on the basis of relevance to the topics covered in this review. Priority was given to studies based on a molecular genetic diagnosis rather than those based on clinical or biochemical criteria alone. Articles containing disease prevalence statistics for the North of England (see the figure for region definition) were included. The minimum point prevalence for each disorder was calculated using live affected cases and UK Office for National Statistics ’ population estimates for the North of England (appendix e-1 on the Neurology ® Web site at

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Residential mobility during pregnancy in the north of England

Residential mobility during pregnancy in the north of England

We have shown that the residential mobility of pregnant women in the north of England is considerably lower than that reported in North America [4,11-14], and lower than the only previous figure of 23.1% quoted for the UK [15]. Consistent with these other studies, we found that mobility was higher in younger women [4,12,14] and in women living in more deprived areas [4,14] and that the majority of moves were over a relatively short distance [11,13-15]. In addition, we found that, overall, residential moves were made to less deprived areas. These data sup- port the anecdotal evidence that this population is com- paratively stable. We have used prospectively collected data from a long-standing, high quality register of congen- ital anomalies that uses multiple sources for case ascer- tainment. However, there are several limitations of these data which may restrict the generalisability of our results. The NorCAS data represent a specific subset of pregnan- cies, namely those affected by a congenital anomaly, and

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Brexit: implications for the rural North of England

Brexit: implications for the rural North of England

 Cumbria LEP also recognises the significance of tourism for the County. They suggest that Cumbria should use the Lake Dist i t s e l a ui ed Wo ld He itage “tatus to aise the p ofile as a destination. Two of the LEP s p io ities are to increase Cum ia s i te atio al isito spe d and improve market penetration in London and the South-East. Currently, international visitors account for only 7% of visitor nights in the County while half of staying visitors are from the north of England. They sugge st the desig of pa kages of e pe ie es hi h ill appeal to o e seas tou ists. There are also ideas being discussed to promote new quality food and drink, events and festivals, adventure sports and the development of heritage trails. It is suggested that the County could attract new and encourage repeat visitors by developing enhanced digital mapping and information to enable people to navigate the Lake District and encourage the use of electric cars and electronic parking information. Cumbria LEP believes that the County is well placed to attract people from the creative industries and also to e o e the ‘o kies of the UK – that is a place where people come to live and work. The

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The Midland and North of England Stillbirth Study (MiNESS)

The Midland and North of England Stillbirth Study (MiNESS)

The study team would like to acknowledge the hospital trusts participating in the study: Central Manchester Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham Women ’ s NHS Trust, Liverpool Women ’ s NHS Foundation Trust, Mid-Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust, University of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust, Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Stockport NHS Foundation Trust, Wirral University Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Countess of Chester Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Mid Cheshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Warrington and Halton Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Southport and Ormskirk Hospitals NHS Trust, Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust, York Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, County Durham and Darlington NHS Foundation Trust, Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust, University Hospitals of Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust, Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, Sandwell and West Birmingham NHS Trust, The Dudley Group NHS Foundation Trust, University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust, Royal Shrewsbury Hospitals NHS Trust, Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals NHS Trust, Burton Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, South Warwickshire NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

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Borders and boundaries in the North of England

Borders and boundaries in the North of England

What is exhibited h ere is a phenomenon that I have termed ‘shifting’ elsewhere (Montgomery 2007). In this case ‘southern shifting’ can be observed, which means that the further south a survey location is, the further south the area of greatest agreement will be loc ated. The results of this ‘shifting’ effect are clearest amongst results from Brampton, Carlisle, Crewe, and Hexham respondents. Those from Crewe show the clearest ‘shifting’ effect, both in the level of agreement across all lines, and in the location of greatest agreement. Here it seems that proximity to the ‘agreed’ location of a North -South divide has resulted in the shifting of this boundary southwards. Such a ‘shifted’ perception of the North-South divide guarantees Crewe-based respondents their own Northern identity. Comments referring the South being ‘posh’, and the people across the divide being ‘up themselves’ indicate that such an identity is important. Such comments echo broader ideological factors which associate ‘Northernness’ and Northern dialect areas with values such as honesty, friendliness, and trustworthiness whilst associating ‘Souther n ness’ and Southern dialect areas with aloofness, a lack of trustworthiness (Montgomery 2007, 245–253), and ‘softness’(Beal 2009, footnote 4).

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The Midland and North of England Stillbirth Study (MiNESS)

The Midland and North of England Stillbirth Study (MiNESS)

The study team would like to acknowledge the hospital trusts participating in the study: Central Manchester Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham Women ’ s NHS Trust, Liverpool Women ’ s NHS Foundation Trust, Mid-Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust, University of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust, Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Stockport NHS Foundation Trust, Wirral University Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Countess of Chester Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Mid Cheshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Warrington and Halton Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Southport and Ormskirk Hospitals NHS Trust, Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust, York Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, County Durham and Darlington NHS Foundation Trust, Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust, University Hospitals of Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust, Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, Sandwell and West Birmingham NHS Trust, The Dudley Group NHS Foundation Trust, University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust, Royal Shrewsbury Hospitals NHS Trust, Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals NHS Trust, Burton Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, South Warwickshire NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

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Geographic variation in hospital costs, payments, and length of stay for opioid-related hospital visits in the USA

Geographic variation in hospital costs, payments, and length of stay for opioid-related hospital visits in the USA

respectively. The lowest LOS was found in East North Central and Mountain regions at an average of 3.8 days. The regions with the highest cost, payment, and LOS were Pacific ($6,671), Mountain, ($9,001), and Mid-Atlantic (5.7 days), respectively. Hospital benefit or loss, the difference between adjusted mean payment and cost, varied considerably across the regions (Figure 2). In the outpatient setting, hospitals were predicted to lose $159 per opioid-related visit, although there was nearly a fourfold difference between the regions with the highest profit margin (East South Central, $119) and the lowest (West South Central, $326). In the inpatient setting, the typical hospital was

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The challenges faced by social enterprises in North West England

The challenges faced by social enterprises in North West England

When asked about access to broadband internet, good mobile telecommunications and access to hardware and equipment, around half of all businesses stated that these did not pose a challenge for them. However, 32% of businesses did cite good mobile telecommunications as a moderate/significant or serious challenge (see Figure 6) and 14 of these 35 respondents were in Cumbria/North Lancs postcodes.

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Biosecurity on cattle farms: a study in North West England

Biosecurity on cattle farms: a study in North West England

There is much information in the literature on diseases that can be purportedly acquired via purchasing cattle; Bazeley [54] contains an extensive list of these. Many farmers were concerned about stock contracting BVD and leptospirosis, two of the most common diseases in dairy herds in the UK [9]. Some producers were worried about their animals contracting bTB; at the time this study was conducted the north-west region of the UK was at relatively low risk for bTB compared to other areas such as the south-west of England and Wales (http://archive.defra.gov.uk/ corporate/about/who/cvo/documents/2005report.pdf). We were initially surprised that two farmers nominated FMD as a particular concern as the 2001 FMD outbreak in the UK had been over for more than 4 years by the time of this study. However there is a growing body of evidence highlighting that this outbreak has had lasting social and psychological effects with members of the farming community experiencing substantial fear of another such disaster occurring [55]. These points highlight the human

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Investigating Catchment Area Anomalies for a North England Store

Investigating Catchment Area Anomalies for a North England Store

Commuting patterns between parts of the CA and AA past the store were analysed and compared with patterns relating all AA commuters to see whether the CA was being avoided in some way. The flows of road users past the Pudsey store were derived from the “travel to work and study” data of the 2001 Census. The CA and AA were segmented into areas north, south, east and west of the Pudsey such that road journeys from west to east (and vice versa) and north to south (and vice versa) would take

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Phonological resistance and innovation in the North West of England

Phonological resistance and innovation in the North West of England

Another example of levelling can be found in certain phonological changes affecting the FACE vowel in Tyneside English (cf. Watt & Milroy 1999, Watt 2002). The traditional Tyneside form of this vowel is /iə/, which is dif- ferent from the RP-like closing diphthong /ei/, and from the monophthongal /e/, which Watt (2002:47) terms the ‘mainstream northern variant’. In modern Tyneside English, how- ever, the traditional FACE vowel is used only by older speakers, with the young preferring the mainstream northern variant. Younger Tynesiders, then, have adopted a supra-local northern variant over the standard variant and as a result are losing one of the features which marks them identifiably as hailing from the North East. Their desire, Watt (2002) points out, is to sound like northerners, but modern northerners, who are aware of – and are inclined to avoid – ‘old fashioned’ phonological features.

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Industrial Strategy and the Regions : the shortcomings of a narrow sectoral focus

Industrial Strategy and the Regions : the shortcomings of a narrow sectoral focus

We begin by detailing the moves the government in Westminster has made to target research and development in a chosen range of sectors. We then deploy official statistics on employment to examine where these sectors are located across the country. We do this at a number of geographical scales – local authority districts, sub-regions (such as Local Enterprise Partnership areas in England) and regions and countries. We also look more closely at the location of research establishments because, along with universities and the R&D functions of companies, these are in the first instance likely to be the prime

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Assessing the geographic origin of the invasive grey squirrel using DNA sequencing: implications for management strategies

Assessing the geographic origin of the invasive grey squirrel using DNA sequencing: implications for management strategies

A Minimum Spanning Tree (Fig. 3) illustrates the frequency of 14 discrete haplotypes found within the 73 samples. Haplotypes are represented by nodes and branches and the number on the branch represents the number of differences within the sequence. K values signify the number of samples sharing this haplotype. Five haplotypes are only found within Alice Holt samples Hap1, 2, 8, AL1 and AL7; shown in black on Fig. 3 (Table 1). Haplotype 10, 11, and 12 are shown to be within the Henbury population and Haplotype four (shown in white) is found within samples from Balloch in Scotland. Haplotypes eight is present in south Cumbria samples (Grasmere and Windermere) and Haplotype nine in England (Henbury and Lancashire). Samples from Scotland, the Scottish/English border and north Cumbria share haplotype 5 and are grouped in Clade 3, suggesting north Cumbria may be derived from Scotland, the Scottish/English border (Table 1). Haplotype 3 is found in Scottish and English samples (Doune and Alice Holt) and Haplotype 6 is seen in North Cumbria and Henbury. Alice Holt and Henbury are two of the source locations used is translocations which may explain these results. Samples from North and south Cumbria, and Lancashire share Haplotype 7 and are also separated in Clade 2, suggesting south Cumbria

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British regional employment and development policies

British regional employment and development policies

There has been little change in the coverage of the Development Areas since they were originally designated in 1966. Special Development Areas have been created within them. The Local Employment Act of 1970 created, further, Intermediate Areas, which were extended in 1971 and 1972. These Intermediate Areas include the area around Edinburgh, Leith and Portobello in Scotland, the north western part of England, the north east and south east coasts of Wales, the Plymouth area in south west England, Yorkshire and Humber­ side and the Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire areas of the East Midlands region. The North Midlands Land Clearance Area includes the upper north part of the East and West Midlands. This separate designation was scheduled in order to give immediate stimulus to industrial buildings and for the restoration and

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