Notes on a Scandal

Top PDF Notes on a Scandal:

The Scandal of Empire: India and the Creation of Imperial Britain

The Scandal of Empire: India and the Creation of Imperial Britain

‘sovereignty’, Dirks argues, in a similar vein, that the Company pursued a relentless policy of expansion through warfare, and consistently understood the privileges granted to them by the Mughal emperor as sovereign rights. And so while the Company had often paid lip service to the ‘productive fiction’ of a ‘dual’ sovereignty in India (productive, Dirks notes, because it could disguise British imperialism under the banner of still-intact Mughal rule), its servants also made a ‘strategic use of [Indian] cultural forms to explain and legitimate a relentless pattern of political and territorial conquest’ (p. 172); a series of conquests, moreover, which were driven by a ‘straightforward calculus of self-interest’ (p. 172). Hastings’s own moves to press more explicitly for forms of Company sovereignty in Bengal, including the extension of Company control over the administration of both civil and criminal justice, while being understood by Burke as a form of personal megalomania, Dirks instead understands as the ‘inevitable logic of empire’ (p. 187). The resultant Company ‘state’ is addressed by Dirks in his sixth chapter. This was a state which, despite Parliamentary efforts to exert control through regulation, found its extension increasingly eased by way of the Governor- General’s consolidation of power. To fulfil his mandate, Dirks argues, Hastings could only work through securing a ‘greater authority’ for this ‘new kind of state form’; a characterization which makes Hastings, in the author’s view, a ‘model servant of empire’ (p. 210). The state’s apparatus for this consolidation included, for example, the extension of a ‘rule of property’ (or a system of agricultural tax collection) as well as the imposition of a set of juridical practices and institutions (though in the execution of these legal practices, Dirks notes, Hastings was willing to be flexible in order to eliminate political opponents such as
Show more

6 Read more

University scandal, reputation and governance

University scandal, reputation and governance

examination because of similarities in their responses. Administrators said that some students supplied identical answers which even had identical typographical errors, indi- cating that they had either written their answers together or had copied them. Approxi- mately 70 of the students were forced to withdraw, retroactive to the start of the school year, would receive tuition refunds, and could return to the university after anywhere from two to four semesters. Until this time, Harvard had been averaging 17 forced withdrawals for academic dishonesty annually. Students argued that similarities among papers could be traced to shared lecture notes or to the fact that many of them had sat in on group meetings with the teaching fellows for the class, who helped students to in- terpret the exam questions. One of the contested issues was that, while collaboration on the exam was prohibited, it was not clear that this included sessions with the teach- ing fellows (Levick, 2012; Perez-Pena, 2013).
Show more

20 Read more

Olympus Imaging Fraud Scandal: A Case Study

Olympus Imaging Fraud Scandal: A Case Study

Olympus created a tobashi scheme to shift losses off the Olympus balance sheet. Companies located in the Cayman Islands were purchased via exorbitant Management and Acquisition Fees. When the first Western President, Michael Woodford, questioned these practices, he was fired after two weeks on the job. Woodford became perhaps the first CEO ever to blow the whistle on his own firm. The subsequent scandal brought arrests of the executive team, an 80% decline in share price, the threat of de-listing on the Tokyo Exchange, and an international look at Japanese Corporate Governance. A detailed list of questions along with extensive teaching notes, bibliography, and references are provided. The case should be of interest in an accounting audit, ethics, governance, or international accounting class.
Show more

8 Read more

The Tokyo Medical University entrance exam scandal: lessons learned

The Tokyo Medical University entrance exam scandal: lessons learned

As such, one school of thought is that rather than post the exams on their websites, there is a strong possibility that many universities may instead keep a copy in their admissions office, making it available for viewing for those willing to visit the campus (Personal correspondence with Sapporo Medical University professor Shinji Kimura, 30 August 2018). In this way, the universities would also be able to avoid reimbursing those holding copyright over the previously published material appearing on the exams. Another possible means of increased transparency would be for universities to send results of the exams to all applicants, regardless of whether they were accepted or rejected. Upon entry at some universities, it may be possible for first-year students to see their overall exam score and where they ranked among the other examinees. It is unlikely, however, that they are permitted to see their actual exam answers. Moreover, as described above, it is not common for universities to provide any exam information to unsuccessful applicants. Examinees have little recourse other than to trust that universities have been honest with the exam results. As the present scandal involving TMU and other universities indicates, that trust may be starting to waver.
Show more

14 Read more

Through the looking glass: controversy, scandal and political careers

Through the looking glass: controversy, scandal and political careers

What scholarly consideration of this connection exists evolved from Easton’s (1965, 1975) assessment of political support, which deliberates on the distinction between specific and diffuse support. Diffuse support constitutes a reservoir of institutional goodwill and is assumed to be distinct from specific support that refers to how the public views incumbents and their performance (Easton, 1975; Bowler and Karp, 2004). The connection between these two forms of support was a fleeting hot topic in the 1970s (see Miller/Citrin 1974 debate), but then it was largely left untouched until the late 1990s when media focus on scandal (Chanley et al., 2001; Orren, 1997) and crime (Chanley et al., 2001) became tools to decipher levels of government trust. Bowler and Karp (2004: 271) suggest that scandals involving legislators have a negative influence on constituent attitudes towards institutions and the political process in both the US and the UK. This finding casts doubt on the favoured chestnut (in the US) that citizens may hold Congress in low regard, but inexplicably love their Congressmen (Parker and Davidson, 1979). Further, and in a more hopeful view of our citizenry, it contests the assumption that citizen evaluations of government are unrelated to their views on incumbent behaviour. Generally, however, these findings are summarised by Keele’s (2007: 242) assertion that trust is a reflection of government performance.
Show more

196 Read more

The Atlanta Public Schools Scandal: Educator Fraud, RICO, And COSO

The Atlanta Public Schools Scandal: Educator Fraud, RICO, And COSO

You are the new Chief Audit Executive (CAE) of the school district in Big City. You have heard of the cheating scandal in the Atlanta Public Schools (APS) and want to learn from it. Your review of the APS scandal reveals that Dr. Beverly Hall was hired as Superintendent of the Atlanta Public School (APS) system with an objective of bringing about change, specifically, an increase in standardized test scores. Within a few years, various schools within APS displayed remarkable improvement in test scores. A major newspaper investigated; this action was followed by an investigation by the state. The Atlanta school board was finally forced to form a Blue Ribbon Commission to study the matter. Cheating took the form of educators erasing students’ wrong answers and inserting right answers, falsifying the certification of the results of tests, and opening the shrink-wrapped tests prior to administration and then resealing them.
Show more

16 Read more

Beyond scandal? Blockchain technologies and the legitimacy of post-2008 finance

Beyond scandal? Blockchain technologies and the legitimacy of post-2008 finance

Prior to the end of The DAO’s initial 28-day funding period, concerns arose regarding a technical flaw that might allow an attacker to withdraw funds raised through the application (Vessens, 2016). Considerable attention was focused on a founder of Slock.it, Stephan Tual (2016), who continually vouched for the impossibility of this event even as The DAO was hacked and drained of funds only days after its initial funding round was completed. The attack on The DAO attracted widespread coverage and debate. Large media organisations, such as The New York Times, chronicled the events that led to the theft of approximately $60 million, yet focused blame on the individuals responsible for programming the code and the hackers (Popper, 2016). Meanwhile, hope was placed in the co-founder of Ethereum, the then 22-year old Russian-Canadian programmer, Vitalik Buterin, to save The DAO by changing the code of its underlying blockchain, despite the fact that such action would undermine the supposed immutability and neutrality of the technology (DuPont, 2017: 170-2). Lost in this scandal were more fundamental issues raised by the technology’s stated aim of pre- programming the collective management of investment. The larger debate between individual human management and collectively automated investment was only rarely considered, and the personalisation of problems with The DAO and Ethereum as a wider project overlooked the novel, bottom-up attempts to collectivise financial investment.
Show more

19 Read more

Notes - Ch. 19.1 Abortion.ppt

Notes - Ch. 19.1 Abortion.ppt

 The abortion rate of women with Medicaid.. coverage is three times as high as that of other women (NAF).[r]

31 Read more

Iracema Dulley, Notes on a Disputed Process of Signification

Iracema Dulley, Notes on a Disputed Process of Signification

This procedure – the initial purpose of which was to preserve the meaning of terms from the Christian doctrine by avoiding charging them with the meanings inherent to the Ovimbundu sym[r]

25 Read more

AP Gov CHP 11 Congress PP.pptx

AP Gov CHP 11 Congress PP.pptx

GW and Creek Indian Treaty, Teapot Dome Scandal (1923), Watergate, Iran-Contra... >Important function[r]

16 Read more

Volkswagen Emissions Scandal: The Perils of Installing Illegal Software

Volkswagen Emissions Scandal: The Perils of Installing Illegal Software

On April 21, 2016, Volkswagen announced that it would either fix or buy back all of the approximately 500,000 diesel cars in the United States which had the emission manipulative software installed in the vehicle. The estimated Kelley Blue Book value of these vehicles was estimated to be $7 billion. At this point in time, Volkswagen had only allocated $7.6 billion to cover the global costs of the emission scandal (Ewing, 2016a). The following day Volkswagen announced that it was going to set aside more than $18 billion instead of the initial estimate of $7.6 billion to cover the costs of the emissions scandal. In addition, Volkswagen announced that it had reported a loss of more than $6.2 billion in 2015 in large part due to the emissions scandal (Ewing, 2016b).
Show more

7 Read more

Scandal and the reform of London workhouse infirmaries 1864-1872

Scandal and the reform of London workhouse infirmaries 1864-1872

ix CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT ABBREVIATIONS ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS MAP INTRODUCTION PART ONE: Chapter Two: The Structure and Function of LondonWorkhouses 18 Power and Responsibility in the Workhou[r]

508 Read more

The scandal of Ulysses

The scandal of Ulysses

demands of history and allegiance. The book is a moral scandal, demanding no less than our lives. It is little wonder that the novel caused such scandal at the time of its publication. I[r]

11 Read more

Understanding and preventing corruption: Lessons from the UK expenses scandal

Understanding and preventing corruption: Lessons from the UK expenses scandal

In the second place, I am struck by the lack of a sense of culpability so often uniting those accused of wrong-doing, and by the degree to which the attitudes expressed are often easy to understand in the sense that we can imagine ourselves having the same views were we in the position of those involved. This thought is directly prompted by the expenses scandal one of whose most distinctive features has been the protestation of many MPs that media handling of their cases has been out of all proportion to the gravity of their alleged offences. The MP, Nadine Dorries, quoted in my opening section spoke for many of her colleagues when, during the course of a BBC interview, she said that ‘MPs are all human beings and they do not deserve to be treated like this’ (BBC News Channel, 22 May 200 attitudes are not surprising: the disclosures in fact took place over an extended period of time drawing ever wider circles of politicians into their net as the focus of investigations daily shifted to different individuals. In this respect – as in a large number of others (Newell, 2009) – the saga closely reflects the ‘Bribe City’ affair, which likewise provoked significant resentment on the part of the politicians involved that they were being unfairly targeted for conforming with a system – of illegal party funding in that case – that was widely known about and accepted. In that case too there was the strong sense that an entire political class was on trial – with media handling of the revelations, and politicians’ fear and uncertainty about whether they would be the next to be exposed, and for what, bringing massive pressure to bear on them. To take a third example, T. Dan
Show more

17 Read more

Preventing Private Information Inference Attacks on Social Networks Syeda Meraj Bilfaqih

Preventing Private Information Inference Attacks on Social Networks Syeda Meraj Bilfaqih

Perhaps the most illustrative example of this type of privacy breach (and the repercussions thereof) is the AOL search data scandal. Private information leakage, c[r]

12 Read more

Information Accessibility and Use as Correlates of Women Political Participation in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria

Information Accessibility and Use as Correlates of Women Political Participation in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria

Akiyode-Afolabi (2011), Agbalajobi (1997) corroborated that women political participation is only voting which is a less demanding political activity. They are influenced by rigid mindset about women in politics, by inadequate political awareness, women are dogged by frivolous political scandal, fear, inferiority complex, husband’s influence which dictates level of involvement, non-education, cultural predilections, religious belief, nature of Nigerian political environment which is hostile, coercion and intimidation, greater family responsibilities, deprivation of rights that have left women with fewer opportunities to acquire political experience, women lack political networks necessary for political successes and are constantly faced with precarious political situations, they lack resources to run campaigns so they are visible as candidates but lack adequate coverage, government failure to domesticate and implement International Conventions that promote women equal participation in policy and governance processes.
Show more

13 Read more

Out of Practice: The Twenty-First-Century Legal Profession

Out of Practice: The Twenty-First-Century Legal Profession

The uncomfortable answer is that the lawyers were there amidst the scandal, but they had abandoned their previous roles as intermediaries between state and society in favor of new rol[r]

44 Read more

Political airs : from monitoring to attuned sensing air pollution

Political airs : from monitoring to attuned sensing air pollution

Thinking about toxic air relations through ‘attuned sensing’ seeks to ‘question before the question’ (Shapiro et al., 2017). It seeks to move away from ‘how much’ to ‘what’ or ‘why’, to find other modes of dealing with polluted air. The perspective is productive because it does not confront different forms of environmental response, but makes visible the value of disconnected and heterogeneous practices, acknowledging the value of all of them, from legal processes for environmental injustice to evidence-based knowledge production practices, app design and blog writing, which acquire relevance precisely in their accumulation. More or less spontaneous and non-coordinated, it is relevant to understand them as forms of sensing because each of them perceived the scandal and made other aspects of the toxicity of the air (its causes and effects and its chemical infrastructure) visible and accountable.
Show more

31 Read more

Synthesis and Enzymatic Studies of Selenium Derivatized Nucleosides, Nucleotides and Nucleic Acids

Synthesis and Enzymatic Studies of Selenium Derivatized Nucleosides, Nucleotides and Nucleic Acids

18 This study provides an in-depth look at the evolution of a controversial scandal involving the intersection of revenue producing intercollegiate athletics and the academic integrity o[r]

147 Read more

Representation of British footballers in the press: private versus public performance

Representation of British footballers in the press: private versus public performance

It is crucial to take into consideration the existence of objectivity in the research. Weber (1990: 12) notes that for content analysis to be valid “different people should code the same text in the same way". This means that if only one individual classifies the articles during the analysis, the conclusions developed can be seen as subjective, and therefore the research can be unreliable. Therefore in this study there were two sets of coders who compared coding results and recorded a 90% consistency rating.

19 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...