Organizational Values

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When Reaching Our Potential Predicts Low Values: A Longitudinal Study about Performance and Organizational Values at Call Centres

When Reaching Our Potential Predicts Low Values: A Longitudinal Study about Performance and Organizational Values at Call Centres

The present study was executed using data from a call centre in Sweden in which agents answered questions regarding financial advice. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship of call centre agents’ perceptions about the work climate and the organizational values to their performance, as measured by the organization. In Study 1, agents (N = 106) reported their experience about the work climate and organizational values. Performance (i.e., percent of time on the phone for each work day) was then assessed for the next six consecutive months. In Study 2, agents’ perceptions of organizational values were measured among a new sample (N = 262) from the same call centre. Performance was measured during the next two consecutive years. With regard to the working climate, workers’ autonomy was nega- tively related to their own performance. The results show also a negative relationship between organizational values and performance during the two following years. Agents seem to maintain high productivity levels at the cost of organiza- tional core values, perhaps due to the visible and rewarding nature of productivity.
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Employee Branding Model Based on Individual and Organizational Values in the Iranian Banking Industry

Employee Branding Model Based on Individual and Organizational Values in the Iranian Banking Industry

Organizational values are intended to inspire employees with creative energy that will push organization forward towards desired goals. Employees who identify with the organization and its core values are more likely to deliver on the brand promise and to be committed and loyal to the brand (Punjaisri et al., 2008). To encourage employees to associate the brand and its attributes as closely as possible to their selves, employee branding advocates recommend orienting the organization’s culture toward the brand so that every expression of the organization, from common organizational artifacts such as decor, equipment, publications, and uniforms to underlying organizational values, manifests the brand’s values and attributes (Harquail, 2006). In this study, organizational values components have been defined as organizational culture, corporate social responsibility and internal marketing being in organization.
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Congruence Index Between Personal and Organizational Values: A Proposed Model for Calculation

Congruence Index Between Personal and Organizational Values: A Proposed Model for Calculation

The earliest studies actually referred to as fitting go back to the 1980s and 1990s (Muchinsky & Monahan, 1987; Schneider, 1987b; Caplan, 1987; Chatman, 1989), most of which used the concept of values. Research in the 1990s and 2000s looks at how value congruence can affect other organizational variables. Recent studies show the impact of congruence between personal and organizational values on organizational success and effectiveness, in bringing together all members of an organization (Vveinhardt & Gulbovaite, 2013; Titov & Umarova, 2017). Value Congruence has been considered the most appropriate predictor of important variables for organizations, such as Organizational Commitment (Caldwell, Chatman & O'Reilly, 1990; O’Reilly et al, 1991; Kristof, 1996; Finegan, 2000; Westerman & Cyr, 2004; Huang et al., 2005; Ostroff et al., 2005; Kristof-Brown, Zimmerman & Johnson, 2005; Lawrence, 2006; Cennamo & Gardner, 2008; Greguras & Diefendorff, 2009; Chiang & Birtch, 2010; Posner, 2010; Suar & Khuntia, 2010; Leung & Chaturvedi, 2011; Agarwal & Sagar, 2012; Seggewiss, Boeggemann, Straatmann, Mueller & Hattrup, 2018), Job Satisfaction (Chatman,1991; O’Reilly et al, 1991; Kristof, 1996; Lauver, Kristof-Brown, 2001; Tepeci & Bartlett, 2002; Silverthorne, 2004; Verplanken, 2004;, Westerman, & Cyr, 2004; Siegall & McDonald, 2004; Kristof-Brown, Zimmerman & Johnson, 2005; Huang et al., 2005; Ostroff et al, 2005; Lawrence, 2006; Cennamo & Gardner, 2008; Edwards & Cable (2009); Greguras & Diefendorff (2009); Chiang & Birtch (2010); Kallas et al., 2010; Posner, 2010); Suar & Khuntia, 2010); Leung & Chaturvedi, 2011; Spanjol, Tam & Tam, 2015; Panahi, Moezzi, Preece & Zakaria, 2016; Hudson, Bryson & Michelotti, 2017), motivation at work (Kristof, 1996; Lawrence, 2006; Posner, 2010; Ren, 2010; Kim, 2012; Ren e Hamann, 2015), Turnover and Intention to quit the job (Chatman, 1991; O'Reilly et al,1991; Kristof , 1996; Kristof-Brown, Zimmerman & Johnson, 2005; Van Vianen, De Pater & Van Dijk, 2007; Abzari, Kabiripour & Saeidi, A.,2015; Rani & Samuel, 2016); Hudson, Bryson & Michelotti, 2017), Differences among Baby Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y (Leiter, Jackson e Shaughnessy (2009)., Rani e Samuel (2016); Grobler & Rensburg (2018).
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THE INFLUENCE OF ORGANIZATIONAL VALUES ON COMPETENCIES OF MANAGERS

THE INFLUENCE OF ORGANIZATIONAL VALUES ON COMPETENCIES OF MANAGERS

This paper discusses the infl uence of organizational values on managers’ competencies. Organizational values are a refl ection of individual values of founder or founding members of the organization. Through time organizational values are shaped by every member of the organization and by events that shape the organization. On the other hand competencies of managers are not shared by the whole organization though they do infl uence the way managers run their organizations and through this also how organizations work. Based on the fi ndings of previous studies a model for measuring the infl uence of organizational values on managers’ competencies was proposed. More specifi cally, by conducting a preliminary study a model was created that discusses the infl uence of six most commonly stated organizational values on the matching competencies. To this end research question has been proposed: What is the level of correlation between organizational values and matching competencies of managers? The paper-and-pencil survey was carried out in the travel and leisure industry, where 1,100 employees were surveyed. The 388 participants who fi lled out the questionnaire represent a 35.27% yield of surveys sent out and 4.26% of the population of this industry in Slovenia. We have determined that there is a statistically signifi cant infl uence of organizational values on matching competencies. This fi nding clearly indicates that organizational values have a strong infl uence on managers’ competencies. This also to some extent supports the idea of managing by values where managing of organizations is focused on organizational values and every decision is done through the scope of these values.
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High Performance Human Resource Practices, Identification with Organizational Values and Goals, and Service Oriented Organizational Citizenship Behavior: A Review of Literature and Proposed Model

High Performance Human Resource Practices, Identification with Organizational Values and Goals, and Service Oriented Organizational Citizenship Behavior: A Review of Literature and Proposed Model

Appraisal is the process of observation and assessment of employee performance against predetermined job-related standards, for the purposesoutlined by the organization (Cheung & Law, 1998). Ahmed, Mohammad, and Islam (2013)stated that performance appraisal plays an important role for continuous improvement. According toTang and Tang (2012), the appraisal process enables the organization to provide signals to employees concerning behaviors that are appreciated. In a similar vein, when employees perceived that their performance appraisals are based on acceptable organizational standards,they are more likely to experience greater organization-based self-esteem andjob confidence (Haynes & Fryer, 2000). The findings by Norris-Watts and Levy (2004)using a sample of 71 undergraduate students in the United States who also worked part-time indicate that favorable performance feedback enhances employees’ commitment, which in turn, leads to greater OCBs. Norris-Watts and Levy (2004) explained that perceptions of a more favorable feedback from the organization may lead employees to believe that the organization values their contribution. As such, they are bound to feel proud of their achievements and become more confident in handling their job responsibilities. This, in turn, will lead employees to engage in more OCBs.Meanwhile, in the context of a developing country such as Pakistan, findings by Ahmed et al. (2013)who conducted a study on 318 employees from the banking sector discovered that performance appraisal has a positive effect on their affective commitment, which in turn,enhances their OCBs. As such, it can be deduced that performance appraisal will have a positive influence on employees’ sense of identification with organizational values and goals, which in turn, encourages employees’ display of SO-OCBs.
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Determinants of environmental management in the red sea hotels: Personal and organizational values and contextual variables

Determinants of environmental management in the red sea hotels: Personal and organizational values and contextual variables

to the existing literature by developing a multilevel theoretical framework to explore determinants of EMPs in hotels, operating at the individual and organizational levels drawing on theories from psychology, sociology, organizational studies and ethics. The analysis starts at the individual-level arguing that EMPs are not only driven by organizational-level determinants but also they may be outcomes of managers’ environmental paradigms or belief systems. This is consistent with theories that emphasized the importance of organizational actors holding eco-centric values to be able to help their companies in the move towards sustainability (e.g. Gladwin et al., 1995; Shrivastava, 1995a, Stead and Stead, 1992; Starik and Rands, 1995). Empirical research has shown also that eco-oriented managers may play a role in corporate greening, although more empirical analyses are still needed in this area. Andersson and Bateman (2000), for example, have demonstrated the critical role that a “strong environmental paradigm” plays in a firm’s decision to adopt EMPs. Applying the Ajzen theory of planned behavior, Cordano and Frieze (2000) and Flannery and May (2000) have also identified managers’ attitudes as an important antecedent to
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The Impact of Organizational Values of Clubs Players and its Correlation to the Performance

The Impact of Organizational Values of Clubs Players and its Correlation to the Performance

a part of organizational research. In the late 1970s, authority inquire about began concentrating on conduct inside organizational change and advancement. Administration suggests power in the broadest feeling of the word and not just the ability to use the stick. It depends on target components, for example, managerial capacity, and more subjective attributes that incorporate individual characteristics of the pioneers. The elements are of considerably more prominent significance given the current developing culture of the attendant who has an unmistakable and emphatic vision about the way of clinical practice. As of now, there is a deficiency of attendants in clinical care, and great pioneers can help any whittling down. Moreover, the authority abilities of attendant directors can add to the accomplishment of their organization. Authority is of expanding significance in clinical nursing. Despite the fact that initiative and organizational culture develops have been very much concentrated, the relationship between them has not been set up in the field of nursing. This review investigates the relationship between organizational culture and authority conduct.
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How Emerging Organizations Take Form: The Role of Imprinting and Values in Organizational Bricolage

How Emerging Organizations Take Form: The Role of Imprinting and Values in Organizational Bricolage

These organizational values informed the range of organizational forms deemed acceptable as ancillary forms. The model of open source software was viewed as suit- able for augmenting Indymedia’s open publishing setup because it emphasized a decentralized form of production and the use of online communication as an organizing tool. Illustrating the normative alignment between open publishing and open source programming, participants felt Indymedia should always use free, open source software that challenged the perceived corporate dominance of information technology. One member emphasized that “open publishing is nothing but the continuation of the free software mode of production” (Hamm 2005). Simi- larly, the volunteer organization form aligned with the desire to avoid commodified relations imposed by state or market and instead rely on the participants’ actual labor. Volunteerism also implied a rejection of profes- sionalization, seen as promoted by accepting outside donations. For instance, Indymedia rallied strongly against a U.S. sister group’s intention to accept a grant from the Ford Foundation because this was seen as violating the principles of the grassroots volunteer organization. Similar normative alignment prevailed with respect to activist cells. One member explained that Indymedia was a political organization that specialized in “demonstrating with keyboards, cables and cameras.” Each of these forms was based on authority relations that emphasized non- remunerated, self-motivated expense of effort, and was based on loose networks that eschewed formal hierarchical structures. Additionally, all these forms emphasized the noncommercial production of goods and services, usually with an orientation to social change, and hence were judged compatible with the value system of autonomism.
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The Relationship between Ethical Values and Organizational Commitment of Staff in Public and Non- Public Hospitals

The Relationship between Ethical Values and Organizational Commitment of Staff in Public and Non- Public Hospitals

Schwepker showed that ethical values contribute to job satisfaction and organizational commitment in a study in 2001 (15). Previous studies show effects of many factors in the ethical behavior of people (16-18). Some studies demonstrate personal and demographic characteristics effects on ethical values like gender and educational level (19-21). Furthermore, other studies show the organizational values such as reward system, cultural values and social training contribute to the ethical behavior (20-25), The organization should pay attention to ethical values in its policy makings (26).
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Looking at Organizational Change Through the Construction and Reconstruction of the Underpinning Values of the Organization Through Interactions Among Stakeholders

Looking at Organizational Change Through the Construction and Reconstruction of the Underpinning Values of the Organization Through Interactions Among Stakeholders

If the future of formal organizations cannot be predicted at their start, it is also not possible to steer their future, as indicated by an ongoing approach of change (Weick & Quinn, 1999), according to which the constant factor is the flow, with stability (the institutionalized categories) being the exception, perceptible at times when the flow is “frozen” in a kind of snapshot. Consequently, the questions appearing at the end of this study, summarized as: “Would CMA opt for profits to the detriment of the development of people and society?” could be answered only through the continuation of the study over time, which is already under way as part of the scope of the broad-ranging project (mentioned in the Methods section), which strives to highlight organizational experiences with the potential to stand out from the mainstream, perhaps ushering a new business mindset, as pointed out by Beer et al. (2011) that is vital for the social, economic and environmental context in the XXI century.
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The Demographic Variables and Emotional Intelligence as Correlates of Work Values: A Cross-Cultural Examination towards Organizational Change

The Demographic Variables and Emotional Intelligence as Correlates of Work Values: A Cross-Cultural Examination towards Organizational Change

Values are defined as the basic convictions about what are personally or socially preferred modes of conduct or goals according to Rokeach [18], as cited in Lu and Lin [7]. There are various classifications such as those of Wray-Lake, Svertsen, Briddel, Osgood and Flanagan [19] to include: importance of work; work that allows time for leisure; job security; extrinsic rewards; materialism; and intrinsic rewards. Super‘s [20] work highlights 15 work values specified as: achievement, management, aesthetics, prestige,altruism, security, associates, supervisory relations, creativity, surroundings, economic returns, variety, independence, way of life, and intellectual stimulation. Ross, Schwartz, and Surkiss [21] argue that despite a plethora of different labels, most work researchers appear to identify the same two or three types of work values: intrinsic or self-actualization values; extrinsic or material values; and social or relational values. They add a fourth distinctive type of work values that parallels the basic self-enhancement higher value type. This type of work values, like self enhancement, should be concerned with prestige or power.
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Indigenous environmental values as human values

Indigenous environmental values as human values

The potential for such indigenous economies has been identified and thoroughly discussed in other water-related research, especially in the works of Altman and Jordan (2008), Grice et al. (2012), Jackson et al. (2012), Maclean and Bana Yaralji Bubu, (2011) and Morgan et al. (2004). It is increasingly acknowledged that economic values for freshwaters should inform water allocation flows (Jackson et al., 2005; Maclean & Bana Yaralji Bubu, 2011; Morgan et al., 2004). Pursuing a river- based sustainable livelihood, especially if it involves spending time on Country, also represents an opportunity to reconnect with Country, and the health and social benefits associated with it have been widely documented in the literature (Burgess, Berry, Gunthorpe, & Bailie, 2008; Burgess, Johnston, Bowman, & Whitehead, 2005; Johnston, Jacups, Vickery, & Bowman, 2007; Weir, 2008). Project participants, however, always made the remark during interviews that jobs need to align with teaching from ancestors, be sustainable and not result in “raping the land” like the Europeans did. Ideally, such jobs would not require the traditional owners to move far away from their ancestral land. Often, participants hinted that they will be foregoing job opportunities that do not meet these criteria, and our participant observations confirmed this point.
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Creating Innovators through setting up organizational Vision, Mission, and Core Values : a Strategic Model in Higher Education

Creating Innovators through setting up organizational Vision, Mission, and Core Values : a Strategic Model in Higher Education

Vision, mission, objectives and core values play major role in setting up sustainable organizations. Vision and mission statements describe the organization’s goals. Core values and core principles represent the organization’s culture. In this paper we have discussed a model on how a higher education institution can prosper to reach its goal of ‘creating innovators’ through its vision, mission, objectives and core values. A model for the core values required for a prospective graduate from higher educational institutions is developed, discussed and analysed. The model identifies some of the core values which are essential for a student/graduate to become successful and stand-out in his/her life. Based on the core values, a set of core principles for higher educational institutions is developed. Finally the benefits of core values and core principles are discussed.
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The Effects of Organizational Support and Organizational Commitment on Organizational Citizenship Behaviour: (A conceptual framework).

The Effects of Organizational Support and Organizational Commitment on Organizational Citizenship Behaviour: (A conceptual framework).

LePine, Erez, & Johnson (2002), posit that one of the most determining factors of OCB is organizational commitment because apart from the fact that it motivates employees to remain with an organization, it also makes employees active members of the organization (Steyrer et al., 2008). Furthermore, it has been argued by Tsai, Cheng, and Chang (2010) that OCB among employees can develop if organizations are able to retain committed employees. In relation to this, results of a study carried out by Khan and Rashid (2012) revealed that commitment is significantly correlated with OCB. Findings of Liu and Cohen (2010) also showed that continuance commitment has a strong effect on OCB. In the same vein, a positive correlation between affective commitment and OCB was found by Allen et al. (2011). A recent study conducted by Premchandani and Sitlani (2015) among 375 employees working in various service organizations in Indore and nearby areas examined the relationship between organizational commitments and OCB with the aim of determining if affective, continuous and normative organizational commitment are strong determinants of OCB or not. The results of the analysis carried out using ‘Structural Equation Model’ (SEM) revealed that normative commitment had the strongest effect on OCB, followed by affective commitment and the weakest predictor of OCB was found to be continuous commitment.
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Beyond personality: exploring the role of motivations, self-evaluations and values in leadership emergence within an organizational setting

Beyond personality: exploring the role of motivations, self-evaluations and values in leadership emergence within an organizational setting

There are many different ways in which future empirical research could build upon these results, ideally across a range of organizational contexts. Firstly, by using experimental methods such as real-world tasks where autonomous groups measure leaders emerging informally. Secondly, gaining leadership ratings from leaders and followers would create a more consistent picture of leadership traits, especially in relation to LMX. Thirdly, conducting longitudinal investigations where people’s leadership development is followed over time allows for tests of cause and effect (whether a variable can predict leadership emergence). Qualitative methods could also be applied to compliment and explore quantitative findings.
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Organizational Culture in the Financial Sector: Evidence from a Cross Industry Analysis of Employee Personal Values and Career

Organizational Culture in the Financial Sector: Evidence from a Cross Industry Analysis of Employee Personal Values and Career

substantially from traditional approaches to measuring organizational culture. This difference, in turn, has both advantages and disadvantages. The method’s most notable advantages are its wide applicability—all that is required are data on personal traits and work outcomes— and the fact that it is indirect, which provides shielding from different types of (response) biases. A first, practical disadvantage is that the method is data intensive, requiring detailed information on both personal traits and work outcomes for a large group of employees. A second, con- ceptual disadvantage is that our ex-post method does not clearly delineate what exactly it is about industries or organizations, which is driving the observed differences in the relationship between employees’ personal traits and their career success. We have taken these differences as reflecting differences in organizational culture. However, strictly speaking, these differences could also be reflecting differences in, for instance, organizational climate. For the purpose of this paper, nothing is lost by not explicitly distinguishing between culture and climate as both are concerned with describing organizational environments and, at any rate, are strongly related (Denison, 1996). Nevertheless, future research may work on thinking about how conceptually distinct elements of organizational environments may get expressed in relationships between different sets of personal traits and employee outcomes. More generally, we think that our indirect approach to assessing organizational culture needs further development before it can realize its full potential as a valuable addition to the existing toolkit for studying organizational cultures, especially when other methods are likely to elicit biased information from the employees concerned. A particularly interesting and important topic for future research is to theorize on the set of interrelationships between employee traits and outcomes that can be combined as a way of providing a comprehensive characterization of organiza- tions’ culture (or climate for that matter). Extant frame- works of organizational culture have identified a variety of different dimensions of organizational culture, and it would be interesting to relate features of organizations’ culture expressed in trait–outcome relationships to the cultural dimensions identified in such earlier work.
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Perceived Organizational Support, Organizational Commitment and Service-Oriented Organizational Citizenship Behaviors

Perceived Organizational Support, Organizational Commitment and Service-Oriented Organizational Citizenship Behaviors

The relationships discussed above seem to imply the mediating effect of organizational commitment in the correlation between POS and service-oriented OCBs. The concepts of social exchange mechanism indicate that employees who perceive that their organization values and cares about them may feel that they ought to be committed to their organization, and in turn reciprocate by exhibiting behaviors that are beneficial to their organization [Organ, 1990; Wayne et al., 1997]. On the basis of the reciprocity norm, POS should create a felt obligation to care about the organization’s welfar e [Eisenberger et al., 2001]. The obligation to exchange caring for caring may enhance employees’ affective commitment to the organization. Employees who have high levels of affective commitment identify with the organization, feel emotionally attached, and share the organization’s values and goals [Allen and Meyer, 1990]. As a result, they are inclined to behave in a manner that helps the organization.
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A Study on Determining the Influence of Organizational Identification on Organizational Justice and Organizational Silence

A Study on Determining the Influence of Organizational Identification on Organizational Justice and Organizational Silence

It is a given fact that the human factor is essential to all fields of activity of organizations. Thus, in the service sector, the importance of human resources that establish communication with external customers gradually increases. Service businesses need individuals who identify themselves with the organization and share their views and ideas for the improvement of the organization. Thus the organizational silence of the individuals should be decreased and the individuals would be transformed to people who have a strong sense of justice and identify themselves with the organization. The organizational justice levels of individuals who identify themselves with their organizations would increase and they would value the interests of the organization better than their own and act for the benefit of the organization sharing their views and ideas. In this context the results of our study provides guidelines for the businesses from which data was gathered. It is also expected to contribute to the body of research in the related literature.
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Organizational identity and hierarchical differences : differences between organizational hierarchies and their effects on descriptions of organizational identity, descriptions of organizational attractiveness and organizational identification

Organizational identity and hierarchical differences : differences between organizational hierarchies and their effects on descriptions of organizational identity, descriptions of organizational attractiveness and organizational identification

employees in their organizational identity perceptions. Employees differ in the units that they are a member of, for example their workgroup or team (Cole and Bruch, 2006). Differences between units in the organization can be seen as differences between sub cultures. All these sub cultures relate differently to the organizational identity (Bartels, Pruyn, de Jong and Joustra, 2007). Therefore they will perceive this identity differently (Corley, 2004). Hierarchical variables: Finally, also hierarchy can cause differences in organizational identity perceptions (Corley, 2004). According to Cole and Bruch (2006), employees may perceive their level within the organization’s hierarchy as a salient social category that is shared with other members of an in-group and not shared with members of an out-group.
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Effects of Organizational Justice on Organizational Commitment

Effects of Organizational Justice on Organizational Commitment

Researches over the past decade have shown that in more or less every type of organizational settings whether public or private, small or large national or multinational, profit seeking or nonprofit seeking, organizational commitment somehow is the topic of discussion and concern for managers, psychologists and organizational behavior (OB) scientists. A committed employee is a key to successes for every organization. Managers and researchers are interested to find out ways and means to increase the level of commitment amongst their employees. Organizational commitment is one of the numerous job-related attitudes that are being examined in relation to other variables for the managing the employees’ behavior effectively. It becomes the foundation for a widespread literature with an aim of focusing on the causes of organizational commitment and its significance for workers behavior and performance in organization (Meyer et al., 2002). Since that organizational commitment has a positive effect on employee’s behavior and desired work outcomes, the interest of researchers in this area increases. Employees who are highly committed to their organizations are considered to be precious and
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