Pathways to Work

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Pathways to Work. The implementation of the EU Council Recommendation for a Youth Guarantee. Ireland

Pathways to Work. The implementation of the EU Council Recommendation for a Youth Guarantee. Ireland

• incentivising employers to provide more jobs for people who are unemployed, and • reforming institutions to deliver better services to people who are unemployed. These strands aim to ensure that persons do not remain on the Live Register for lengthy periods without an appropriate offer of assistance from the State. In return, individuals are aware of their responsibility to commit to job-search and/or other employment, education and training activities or risk losing welfare entitlements. Together, the five strands of ‘Pathways to Work’ present a coherent and effective transformation of Ireland’s labour market activation policies which is manifest in the roll-out of the new Intreo employment/income support services offices.
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Pathways to Work. The implementation of the EU Council Recommendation for a Youth Guarantee. Ireland

Pathways to Work. The implementation of the EU Council Recommendation for a Youth Guarantee. Ireland

• incentivising employers to provide more jobs for people who are unemployed, and • reforming institutions to deliver better services to people who are unemployed. These strands aim to ensure that persons do not remain on the Live Register for lengthy periods without an appropriate offer of assistance from the State. In return, individuals are aware of their responsibility to commit to job-search and/or other employment, education and training activities or risk losing welfare entitlements. Together, the five strands of ‘Pathways to Work’ present a coherent and effective transformation of Ireland’s labour market activation policies which is manifest in the roll-out of the new Intreo employment/income support services offices.
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Reforming Disability Insurance in the UK: Evaluation of the Pathways to Work Programme

Reforming Disability Insurance in the UK: Evaluation of the Pathways to Work Programme

The Pathways to Work programme, hereafter ‘Pathways’, has been subjected to a very intensive evaluation process. The scheme was piloted in some areas before being progressively phased in across the rest of the country. The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) commissioned independent institutes to run a full-scale evaluation of the program, with both qualitative and quantitative studies, the collection of surveys before and after the implementation of the program, as well as the use of all administrative data available. 3 This paper presents the quantitative evidence on the economic impact of the programme, using data from the initial pilot areas. Using a difference-in-differences methodology, we compare labour market participation, hours of work, earnings, health and benefit receipts for individuals in areas where the programme was implemented with claimants in areas with similar labour markets. We find a significant impact on the probability of returning to work – 5.8 percentage points 18 months after the start of the claim – and an increase in the rate of exit from the DI scheme peaking 6 months after the claim, but fading away by 12 months. Although the employment effect seems to be long-lasting, the impact on benefit outflows is limited to duration claims less than a year. We present evidence suggesting that these apparently puzzling results can be explained by the dynamic process of IB claims. The individuals who have gone back to work because of Pathways would have left the DI scheme in less than a year anyway but would not have returned to the labour market. The programme seems to have had most impact on women living with a partner who have suffered some physical incapacity. Without the programme they would have left IB but remained out of paid work.
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Employability through health? Partnership-based governance and the delivery of Pathways to Work condition management services

Employability through health? Partnership-based governance and the delivery of Pathways to Work condition management services

to information and power. For Entwistle and Martin, partnership-working has the potential to access the distinctive competencies contained within different sectors, with participants involved on the basis that they can add value, rather than their effectiveness in responding to market disciplines and contractual processes. The current and future British governments face the challenge of rising unemployment and a continuing commitment to reducing the numbers claiming IBs. There is room for a wide range of stakeholders in addressing these challenges. However, as the IB reform agenda re-focuses on the long-term stock of clients and a larger, more complex, new ‘work-related activity’ group, then combining health and employ- ability interventions will play an increasingly important role. There is also scope for a range of different approaches to the governance of employability/health services under interventions such as PtW. But standardised approaches to contracting-out, and the Work First interventions that they often seem to inspire, may not be appropriate for structuring programmes that will inevitably need to draw in clinical and other expertise from a range of sources, and which will be required to assist people with complex problems to make gradual progress towards work. Policy- makers need to be open to the potential added value associated with flexible, partnership-based forms of governance and the role of public-sector actors as well as for-profit providers if they are to arrive at effective approaches to promoting employability and health.
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Pathways to Work from Incapacity Benefits: A study of experience and use of Return to Work Credit

Pathways to Work from Incapacity Benefits: A study of experience and use of Return to Work Credit

People described a number of reasons for wanting to move from incapacity benefits into work. Some said that their health had improved or their treatment had finished, and going back to work was the natural thing to do at that stage. They wanted to go back to jobs they enjoyed, or take further steps in chosen careers. Some saw returning to, or trying, work as a demonstration to themselves of their recovery, a way of getting their lives under control again, and being ‘normal’ again. People who had been claiming incapacity benefits for several years spoke about their boredom at home, and wanting more interaction with people again. Some mentioned encouragement from partners or parents, and GPs as influential when they thought about working. Those who said wanting more money was a strong influence included people supporting children; people who had run down savings while claiming incapacity benefits; people who were fed up with having so little to spend; people who wanted to pay off debts; or wanted to be able to afford to run their cars, renovate their homes, or move to live independently. Some people with working partners mentioned wanting some financial independence through their own earnings, or wanting to make their own financial contribution to the household. There was some dislike of having to deal with Jobcentre Plus, and feelings of guilt that arose from claiming benefits, and some felt some pressure from other members of their family.
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Alternative Pathways

Alternative Pathways

• Please note: ONTABA welcomes questions regarding the Pathways, however, it is highly recommended that you read the application package (located at www.ontaba.org) several times prior to asking questions, as most information is located within the application.

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Pathways Guide.

Pathways Guide.

the university of technology, sydney (uts) offers practice-based learning on cutting-edge facilities in courses continually updated to reflect developments in research and technology. Our partnerships with industry, and work placements offered, put you at the forefront of professional knowledge in your study area.

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TAKING CONTROL: PATHWAYS TO DRUG POLICIES THAT WORK

TAKING CONTROL: PATHWAYS TO DRUG POLICIES THAT WORK

Ultimately the most effective way to reduce the extensive harms of the global drug prohibition regime and advance the goals of public health and safety is to get drugs under control [r]

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Pathways With Friends

Pathways With Friends

An overhead transparency (page 4) summarizing the steps of the cell signaling pathway.. Per Group of 6.[r]

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development pathways

development pathways

through the unreDD programme, unDP in collaboration with uneP and Fao is supporting integration of the national strategy for reducing emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (reDD) into the sectoral policies, programmes, and initiatives. the programme has provided facilitation and support to analytical work (cost elements of reDD+) of institutions (national reDD+ task Force, national carbon monitoring centre) and to policies (notably the national reDD+ strategy and an action Plan for implementation). un-reDD has strengthened the capacity of the ministry of natural resources and tourism to integrate climate change concerns in its policies, projects, and programming. the programme has facilitated information sharing where a wide range of awareness materials have been made available. unDP facilitated the training of 400 foresters and 30 journalists on reducing carbon emissions, deforestation, and environmental degradation.
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Conference Reflective social work practices in contemporary societies: crossed dialogues and new pathways between praxis and research

Conference Reflective social work practices in contemporary societies: crossed dialogues and new pathways between praxis and research

Karen Healy biography: Karen Healy is Professor of Social Work at The University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia. She is also the National President of the Australian Association of Social Workers, a position she has held since 2011. Professor Healy is a National Director of The Benevolent Society, which is Australia’s oldest not-for-profit community service agency. Professor Healy has written four books, with a fifth on the way, and numerous book chapters and journal articles. Her research focuses on child and family welfare, social work theory for practice and organisational and social change. Her works have been translated into several languages.
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People with disabilities: Pathways to decent work - Report of a tripartite workshop, Lusaka, Zambia, 9-10 May 2006

People with disabilities: Pathways to decent work - Report of a tripartite workshop, Lusaka, Zambia, 9-10 May 2006

Different types of legislation are associated with each of these approaches. Where a moral approach prevails, legislative provisions that may benefit persons with disabilities are generally in the form of charity law, and they provide for relief in the case of destitution, usually involving care in institutions or asylums. Associated with the medical model of disability, legislation may deal with some or all of social security and social protection, health and medical rehabilitation, employment quotas, and employee compensation. Such laws focus on providing compensation for impairment, and frequently envisage service provision in segregated settings, rather than in services available to the general population. Legislation associated with the social and rights-based approaches to disability includes anti-discrimination law, employment equity law, and laws concerning job-retention and return to work. The focus here is on integration and inclusion, and the prohibition of discrimination on the basis of disability.
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Time Banditry as a Coping Mechanism: Emotion-Focused and Problem-Focused Pathways from Stressors to Counterproductive Work Behaviors

Time Banditry as a Coping Mechanism: Emotion-Focused and Problem-Focused Pathways from Stressors to Counterproductive Work Behaviors

effort (Grawitch et al., 2010). Because time banditry involves reallocating these scarce resources away from work and toward one’s personal domain, it represents a way to directly control the interference of work with one’s personal life. Thus, employees should be more likely to evaluate time banditry as a potential solution to this stressor than as a way to feel better about it. Even if employees form perceptions that time banditry could help them cope emotionally with work-life conflict, the perceived problem-solving capabilities of time banditry should still more strongly drive their actual behavior. When coping with stressors, individuals are motivated to expend resources in ways that best prevent further resource loss (Hobfoll, 1989). Thus, they should be most likely to choose time banditry based on its ability to help them fulfill their personal obligations – an accomplishment that helps them retain important personal resources such as social relationships – rather than merely its ability to temporarily ease their negative emotions. For instance, an employee who needs to pick his child up from daycare during work hours is more likely to leave work early based on the perception that it will allow him to fulfill his personal responsibilities (thereby temporarily resolving a conflict between work and personal life), rather than the perception that it will allow him to relax. Therefore, I predict:
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Pathways to Collaboration

Pathways to Collaboration

interviewees described included differences in focal system (e.g., child or adult); mistrust between professionals; confusion about different constraints, mandates, and operations in other systems; and even hostility toward other systems. In general, interviewees described processes in which these differences were surfaced and addressed in group settings, such as collaborative meetings. In some cases, discussion of different values and expectations were facilitated directly. For example, in one county the collaborative team developed a written list of core values to guide their work. In other counties, these issues were addressed even if not labeled as such. “You don’t just sit down and say we are going to do values clarification,” observed one county manager. “We just identified projects that needed to be done and in the process we would see some of the values issues…we would even have some heated discussions. Ultimately, we had to work these through to get on with the mission of collaboration.” Some of the specific conflicts in values mentioned by interviewees included concerns from child welfare about whether or not alcohol and drug staff would “protect” parents over concern about child safety, resistance from both child and adult attorneys to advocate for their clients in a collaborative context, concern from alcohol and drug treatment providers as well as child welfare staff about incarceration as a consequence for non-compliant parents, and whether or not a parent who relapses or uses drugs can be a good parent. The narratives from interviewees described a deliberate and sometimes difficult process of “starting up and then going through an evolution” that often began in a context where “everyone wanted to protect their turf and seemed out for their own agencies” and required “a lot of discussion that increased understanding and awareness of different disciplines.”
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PATHWAYS TO SUCCESS

PATHWAYS TO SUCCESS

Work-Based Learning is designed to provide students part-time work experience and classroom instruction that will prepare them with attitudes and skills necessary to be successful in today’s work force. Students may earn two (2) credits for attending the Career Preparation class each day and working a minimum of 10 hours weekly or three (3) credits for attending the Career Preparation class each day and working a minimum of 15 hours weekly. The course should span the entire school year, and classroom instruction must average one class period each day for every school week. A student is expected to be enrolled the entire school year; however, in accordance with local district policy, a student may enter or exit the course at semester when extenuating circumstances require such a change.
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Pathways in education

Pathways in education

• organise learning pathways into and out of school, non formal/informal, Vocational Educational & Training and university education. • identify critical quality benchmarks/standa[r]

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Pathways to antiracism

Pathways to antiracism

Discussion and implications A strong push for NAPs against racism and related intolerances by the UN after the 2001 WCAR has resulted in a number of countries developing such plans, with various levels of success. Developing a NAP can be used to consolidate and drive new government and civil society-led projects against racism and other forms of discrimination. Doing this in a way that results in productive outcomes requires large amounts of funding, as well as high-level government commitment in the form of senior ministerial responsibilities or in setting up an independent statutory institute. Four key considerations appear to influence the roll-out and success of NAPs, namely knowledge production, action-oriented plans, partnerships and governance models. These are outlined in detail below. Given the limitations of this scoping exercise in assessing and evaluating the successful implementation and impact of the plans analysed here, it is recommended that the South African government explore these outcomes further through additional research and communication with the government officials and authorities responsible for these plans in the respective countries. Discussions of this kind would be particularly useful with Norwegian, Argentinian and Mexican delegates. Nevertheless, there is a nagging question of what it means to develop a NAP beyond that of technical compliance to the DDPA. In other words, is drawing up a NAP against racism and related intolerances worth doing, and do they work? While a complete evaluation cannot be given here, the last part of this concluding section raises some issues worth noting in this regard.
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PATHWAYS TO A CAREER SHEEP & WOOL. Pathways to a career: Sheep & Wool

PATHWAYS TO A CAREER SHEEP & WOOL. Pathways to a career: Sheep & Wool

A guide to career opportunities in the sheep & wool industry It could be argued that the wealth and prosperity we enjoy today has originated from the sheep and wool industry. After all, Australia’s economy was often said to ‘ride on the sheep’s back’. This booklet will highlight the incredible opportunities that exist in this diverse industry and entice you to delve deeper into the great careers that exist. Whether you want work on a sheep farm or maybe even own a property, this booklet will direct you to the pathways you can take to achieve your goal.

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Indiana Math Pathways

Indiana Math Pathways

Phase 1: Develop and Vet Quantitative Reasoning Courses by the Core Transfer Library Math Panel The first step in implementing the Council’s recommendations is to have the CTL Math Panel review the content and learning outcomes of Quantitative Reasoning courses that are currently being offered or are under development. The Panel should also review the content of courses currently being offered that contain significant elements of Quantitative Reasoning, although these courses are not titled Quantitative Reasoning. Taking into account the results of this analysis, as well as the work of the Council’s own subcommittee contained in Section IV of this report, the Panel should then reach consensus on the content and learning outcomes of courses that might reasonably be grouped in Indiana under the heading of Quantitative Reasoning, irrespective of what a particular institution chooses to call the course.
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Ascending Sensory Pathways

Ascending Sensory Pathways

The ascending sensory pathways are the main avenues by which information concerning the body’s interaction with the external environment, its internal condition, and the position and movement of its parts, reach the brain. One similarity shared by all three ascending sensory pathways from the body (not including the head or face) is that the first order neuron cell bodies reside in the dorsal root ganglia. It is interesting to note that conscious perception of sensory information from external stimuli is mediated by the spinothalamic and DCML pathways to the ventral posterior lateral nucleus of the thalamus, whereas sensations that do not reach consciousness are mediated by the spinoreticular, spinomesencephalic , spinotectal, spinohypothalamic, and the anterior, posterior, and rostral spinocerebellar, and cuneocerebellar tracts . These tracts terminate in the reticular formation, mesencephalon, hypothalamus and cerebellum, respectively.
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