Philosophy of Education

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A Scientometric Study Of The Journal Of Philosophy Of Education

A Scientometric Study Of The Journal Of Philosophy Of Education

This study introduces a bibliometric analysis of the Journal of Philosophy of Education, a journal of the field Education and Educational Research which has had presence in the Journal Citations Index (JCR) during the last 20 years. Collaborations between authors, countries and its gender distribution have been analyzed. Low values of Collaborative Index and Degree of Collaboration have been found, compared to other Social Science journals. Geographical collaboration is analyzed, where the network of countries pivots around United Kingdom. An increase of female authorship in the journal is noticed over the years, as well as higher levels of collaboration when at least one of the authors is a woman.
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Philosophy of Education: A Tool for National Development?

Philosophy of Education: A Tool for National Development?

Wisdom or knowledge which is central in philosophy and philosophy of education is a necessary means of good life and national development. Philosophy is the search to know and understand the nature of man, creation and the world, knowledge, value and good life. Philosophy becomes significant as Adaeze (2003) noted, at the point where educators recognize the need to think clearly about what they are doing, and to relate what they are doing in the large context of man and society. Man’s thoughts hold the key to his life and the society he lives in. Phi- losophy of education is a means of good life, when it gives directions as well as guidelines for good human rela- tionships in any social setting, and calls for order through corrective suggestions and actions, aimed at bringing just living, co-habitation and prosperity for all.
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The worldview of the pilgrim and the foundation of a confessional and narrative philosophy of education

The worldview of the pilgrim and the foundation of a confessional and narrative philosophy of education

Based on Loughlin’s premise (1996) that the rise of postmodernity is intrinsically linked both to modernity and to the pre-modern Christian vision of the world, in particular, we have attempted in a previous article (Braun & Potgieter 2019) to justify and present the basic tenets of, specifically, a (Christian) confessional and narrative approach to the philosophy of education in a postmodern context. We pointed out that postmodernity’s incredulity towards meta- narratives re-opened the world towards its pre-rational foundations by means of the rediscovery of the primacy of narrative. We also asserted that any philosophy of education implies a basic understanding of the historical present and the past in order to situate itself in the world (including in the scholarly community of educators and educationists). Consequently, our exploration of the work of narrative has shown that a particularly Christian narrative approach to the philosophy of education offers a viable alternative to postmodern nihilism. More specifically, this is the case because postmodern approaches of master narratives are told against the Void and ultimately lead to nothing (Jameson 2 1991:44). A Christian approach to narrative on the
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Modern Basics Philosophy of Education

Modern Basics Philosophy of Education

out within the limits of the subject and object of the research of philosophy of education, are only possible in a competition and diversity of national education systems. Based on the achievements of neurobiology, psychology, pedagogy and philosophy of education, the people and states of the world create their national education systems, whose effectiveness has been evaluated in the specific socio-cultural environment. The competition of created systems serves for the benefit of the development of the civilization, as it constantly actualizes demands in the scale of the civilization, and personal characteristics and improves the technology of their formation and con- solidation in minds.
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A Rationale for Requiring Philosophy of Education in Preservice Teacher Programs

A Rationale for Requiring Philosophy of Education in Preservice Teacher Programs

obsolescence that characterizes so many of our household purchases” (p. 46). More specifically in regard to the future educator, Paul (1985) insisted, “The single most useful thing a teacher can do is to take at least one well-designed college course in critical thinking, in which the teacher’s own thinking skills are analyzed and nurtured in a variety of ways” (p. 37). In spite of these best practices, many of the policy implications of standardized testing, common core content standards, and NCLB mandated reforms would appear to devalue any critical thinking on the part of the individual classroom teacher. Preservice teachers who study the philosophy of education have an excellent opportunity to critically reflect upon policy, theory, and classroom practice, that is, to question why certain methods, resources, and content are required so as to improve the quality of their teaching and enhance student learning. “If we want real change, if we want real educational reform, we need to do a better job of immersing teacher education students in the life-changing experience of philosophical contemplation” (Theobald & Tanabe, 2011, p. 42). Such reflective thinking or philosophical contemplation necessarily leads to
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Modern philosophy of education

Modern philosophy of education

It is somewhat simple and too naive to enunciate a methodological culture as the main value of a creative professional and do hardly anything for this purpose. To declare and to organize are very different. There is a need to use the achievements of methodological culture, which has to be adjusted to purposes of the educational process. The didactic of teaching a method of science shall become a special area in higher school of pedagogic. To be more accurate, it is necessary to distinguish between two didactics. One is the didactic of teaching aimed at professors, while another – is the didactic of learning focused on students. It is equally important for both to realize that learning a method can only be efficient when it is done through self-education. It is important to understand that the idea of teaching a method in its pedagogical sense has enough grounds to be a perspective provided it is supported by a retrospective view. Objectives and ideal patterns that a national research university faces shall be achieved by uniting the efforts of all scientists, students, and employees. Both creativity and methodological culture based on the method of scientific knowledge is the primary focus of modern philosophy of education. Teaching this method can only be effective if implemented through self-education, self-development, and self-fulfillment.
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The rise and fall of philosophy of education: An institutional analysis

The rise and fall of philosophy of education: An institutional analysis

Entry #2, “aims of education,” should not be a surprise. It is a routine philosophical question which sets the direction and destination of the educational process, such as may be captured in the question, “what is education for?” This question always requires an answer from whoever is the source of the educational process, whether a teacher, or those designing an education system. More surprising may be entry #1, which expects philosophy of education-type courses to be the vetting grounds for controversy and difference of outlook on educational issues. No other courses in education are likely to advertise any kind of disputation—psychology, curriculum, and administration of schools tending to be more monolithic in their prescriptions for teachers and less likely to invite debate. Over time, as policy would set answers to the aims of education and other controversies, the value of these debates diminish, or at the very least, are less valuable than other courses which offer content believed to be either: (1) “cutting-edge” and thus scientific; (2) immediately practical—this content particularly desired by students; or (3) content that must be taught, such as new laws, policies, and professional standards enforced either through accreditation of teacher education programs, or mandatory professional bodies. If philosophy-type coursework had no “of necessity” about it, eventually it would recede its place in teacher education programs, crowded out especially by new findings of science, the practical
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Basis of a philosophy of education

Basis of a philosophy of education

seek f o r a p h ilo so p h y o f l i f e t h a t w i l l be com plete, t h a t w i l l co v er ev ery p h ase o f human l i f e , v e g e ta b le , anim al, i n t e l l e c t u a l , s p i r i t u a l and em otional * And th e obvious a n s­ w er, which may sound a b i t f l i p p a n t , i s t h a t th e o n ly p h ilo ­ sophy t h a t embraces th e t o t a l i t y o f l i f e i s to be found in th e philosophy t h a t men down th ro u g h th e ages have developed to meet a l l th e demands o f o b s e rv a tio n , ex p erien ce and though^* In b r i e f , i t i s o n ly i n th e p h ilo so p h y o f R e a lity t h a t such a com plete system w i l l be found. And t h a t philo so p h y o f r e a l i t y i s th e c l a s s i c a l philo so p h y o f th e a n c ie n t G reeks, n o t th e id e a lism o f a P la to , n o t th e i n t e l l e c t u a l i s m o f a S o c ra te s , c e r t a i n l y n o t i n th e mere phenomenalism o f P arm enides, and c e r t a i n l y n o t i n th e d e n ia l o f wisdom o f th e s k e p ti c s , b u t i n th e re a lis m o f th e g r e a t e s t o f th e G reeks, A r is to tle * The reaso n fo r choosing A r is to tle as th e source o f p h ilo so p h ic i n s p i r a t i o n i s t h a t he was th e f i r s t t o give p h ilo so p h ic e x p la n a tio n to th e b a s ic problems t h a t were tro u b lin g th e minds o f th e th in k e rs # To r e a l i z e th e im pact o f A r i s t o t e l i a n th o u g h t on th e i n t e l l e c t u a l w orld i t i s n e c e ssa ry to b ear i n mind t h a t r e a l i s t i c p h ilo so p h e rs a re se e k in g , n o t an id e a l system o f th o u g h t, b u t a system o f th o u g h t t h a t w i l l make u n d e rsta n d a b le th e r e a l i t i e s w ith which' man i s fa c e d . The c o n s ta n t problems of r e a l i t y a re always w ith u s , th e mind i s always co n fro n ted
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“The Diffusion of Light”: Jefferson’s Philosophy of Education

“The Diffusion of Light”: Jefferson’s Philosophy of Education

Outside of salubrious novels, he continues to Burwell, there were other items important for female education. First, the French language was indispensable for females’ education. For ornament, there were dancing, drawing, and music. Next, dancing was healthy, and its practice allowed for participation in “circles of festivity” (1984, p. 1412) without gawkiness. Drawing was innocent, engaging, and often useful. Music was a “delightful recreation for the hours of respite from the cares of the day” (p. 1412), but should only be attempted by those with an ear, as it were. Otherwise, it might bring shame to the avowed musician. Most significantly, there was household economy. “Diligence and dexterity in all its processes are inestimable treasures. The order and economy of a house are as honorable to the mistress as those of the farm to the master, and if ether be neglected, ruin follows, and children destitute of the means of living” (pp. 1412- 1413). The statement— that household economy was to be divided between husband and wife, with husband assuming order outside of the house and wife, inside of the house— is starkly Aristotelian (1990b, I.3– 13).
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EDUC 703 Philosophy of Education, Sitka.pdf

EDUC 703 Philosophy of Education, Sitka.pdf

Education should be available to everyone no matter their race, social economical position, gender and religious belief. Education should include compulsory kindergarten through 8 th grade. Not all students are suited for college due to their natural abilities. Gardner suggested that there are nine different types intelligences in which some children will be much more adapt at working with their hands than others (Alkan, Ozgen, & Narli, 2011, Ari, 2011, Avery,

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A theistic evaluation of John Dewey's philosophy of education

A theistic evaluation of John Dewey's philosophy of education

161 CHAPTER EIGHT RELIGION ITT GENERAL EDUCATION On both theoretical and practical grounds,Dewey thinks there should be no theistic religion incorporated in the educational philosophy of[r]

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Curriculum planning requirement of philosophy of education for Students

Curriculum planning requirement of philosophy of education for Students

One of the goals of any educational system is to educate conscious people. Therefore, it is necessary to consider such a goal in the curricula (Zarghami, 2008). Therefore, education should teach students to think properly and train them to be purposeful and futuristic. These goals are set in the form of fictional and narrative content and are provided to the teacher and student. Early books in this area included stories, stories and novels. At present, any subject can be included in the curriculum of teaching philosophy to children (Ghaedi, 2004). The content is often in the form of stories, as the child compares himself to fictional characters. It is more rational and intellectual and less emotional. Children speak and think about the story's characters and characters. The stories use language that resembles the child's actual language and is consistent with the child's cognitive developmental stages (Abbasi anabad & Seadatee Shamir ,2016). Teaching Philosophy to Children: Teaching children philosophy is the golden key that can help children develop the most important aspect of their child's thinking. By designing and implementing a philosophy program for children, Lipmann briefly calls it "Teaching Philosophy to Children," trying to bring philosophy back to its true position as Socrates intended it. In his opinion, philosophy is not for adults and children can do it. He applied philosophy in the sense of philosophizing, something that children can do and are inherently inclined to do (Seifi Gandmani, Shafaghi, and Kalantari Meybodi, 2011).
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A Reinterpretation of Confucian Philosophy of Education

A Reinterpretation of Confucian Philosophy of Education

On the contrary, Confucius’ thought on education rejects the banking education which “anesthetizes and inhibits creative power” [2]. Therefore, Confucius’ learning theory does not preclude critical thinking and can be of high relevance to education today. Traditional wisdom can be useful in tackling modern prob- lems if we take a balanced attitude towards them, as is conveyed in a Chinese idiom—“ Qu qi zaopo, qu qi jinghua ” [meaning “discarding the dross, selecting the essence”]. What goes wrong with Confucian education may be more con- cerned with the fact that traditional and classical texts may be made an unchal- lengeable authority for learners to treasure up (which is not to deny that many of the values conveyed by ancient classics have been respected for centuries in Chinese society even up to today as they deserve) than the way it engages learn- ers in learning. Confucian emphasis on the importance of transmission of values (especially those which have withstood the test of time and human experiences) may give a new momentum to the establishment of a comprehensive education system and make Confucianism a living tradition for the twenty-first century [18]. In making this point, the inquiry problematizes the uncritical assumption that all traditional education theories especially those from peripheral cultures are necessarily irrelevant to contemporary language education. It is our language teachers’ professional commitment to delve into how certain practices which learners from non-Anglophone background have inherited from their own cul- tures are appreciated and made good use of.
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Education culture and politics: the philosophy of education of Raymond Williams.

Education culture and politics: the philosophy of education of Raymond Williams.

Mcllroy, 'Border Country: Raymond Williams in Adult Education, Part 1', Studies in the Education of Adults, Vol.. Fieldhouse, 'Oxford and Adult Education' unpublished paper, University[r]

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following philosophy with children concepts in practice of teacher education

following philosophy with children concepts in practice of teacher education

This article aims to describe the way that the concept of pedagogy of dialogue and reflection was introduced into the teacher-education track at the University of Haifa (Israel) based on the principals of Philosophy with Children. The model seeks to cultivate the teacher-training student’s ability to integrate various types of knowledge—practical and theoretical—within the framework of a dialogical learning community composed of teacher-training faculty and educational teams from field-training schools. At its base lies the view that teaching is a practical-reflective profession, students regarding the school as a place of learning and coming to affirm its value based on their recognition of the contribution assignments make to their own developments and society in general (Marshall, 1990). Enriched by the pedagogy of dialogue and reflection, the educational-intellectual atmosphere in such an environment can develop into a vibrant and dynamic space fostering intellectual tension and the sense of innovation and creativity that are so necessary for the educational task. The pedagogy of dialogue and reflection in a dialogical community further expands the mentoring teacher’s role, making teacher-trainees part of a community of school teachers who are intimately involved in their training and ongoing education with the express intent of making them part of their community in particular and the education system in general. The main goal is that these teachers-students will, later in schools, will practice dialogical tools with their students.
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parallel convergences: thinking with biesta about philosophy and education

parallel convergences: thinking with biesta about philosophy and education

In this paper the question of the kind of dialogue that is possible between P4wC and Gert Biesta’s educational thinking is explored. The assumption – based also upon a reflection about the style of argumentation of Biesta when he addresses P4wC – is that a dialogue is possible, despite the misgivings that he manifests about how P4wC could end up merely turning into a broadened form of education for critical thinking. In order to investigate how this dialogue could look like, this response engages with what can represent a major bone of contention, namely the intimate bond between philosophy and education, which is pivotal in the P4wC project and which, instead, Biesta seems to problematise, spotting in it the perpetuation of a kind of “mentalisation” plaguing much of the Western educational and philosophical tradition. After construing this radical challenge as a Levinasian move, the paper endeavours to show how P4wC can be taught by it. In particular, it is argued that Biesta’s concerns can help us to rediscover a specific view of what philosophising-together as sumphilosophein (to adopt an Aristotelian notion) may mean and to look at the community of philosophical inquiry as the site of the ‘polemic commonality of philosophy and education.’ While recognizing the points of contact and (possible) encounter with Biesta’s ideas, the paper excludes any ‘fusion of horizons’ and proposes, instead, two other metaphors to capture the kind of dialogue which can go on.
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IMPACT OF THE PHILOSOPHY OF SWAMI VIVEKANAND ON EDUCATION AND IT’S RELEVANCE TO MODERN SYSTEM OF EDUCATION

IMPACT OF THE PHILOSOPHY OF SWAMI VIVEKANAND ON EDUCATION AND IT’S RELEVANCE TO MODERN SYSTEM OF EDUCATION

According to Swami Vivekanand to become a „good receiver‟ of education, the student must be „teachable‟. The essential virtues of the taught are: purity, real thirst of knowledge and preservance. He must have confidence, conviction, trust, reverence, humanity and submission towards the teachers. The teacher-pupil relationship, based on mutual respect and trust is the foundation of education system proposed by Vivekanand. In modern times most of the students have lost moral values and they lack respect towards teachers, parents and elders. They are becoming only rote learners. Some students have forgotten their aim of education and got themselves involved in drugs and other malpractices. They do not follow love, compassion, sympathy etc rather their belief is only give and take.
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THE HONG KONG INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION RESEARCH POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY & MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY

THE HONG KONG INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION RESEARCH POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY & MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY

If you are required to obtain a student visa / entry permit issued by the Director of the Hong Kong Immigration Department in order to study in Hong Kong, you are regarde[r]

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Development and Philosophy of Higher Education of Public Universities in Malaysia

Development and Philosophy of Higher Education of Public Universities in Malaysia

This is so because, the integration between market and the original philosophy of higher education has the potential of creating tension and dilemma for many universities. Often, the former may sideline the idealisation of the latter. The main reason for this, is that, the paradigms that constitute market idealism and the very philosophy of higher education is rarely consistent. On one hand, the idea of market could leads to the creation of an elite form of higher education which concerns more on commercialisation of research outputs and graduate education rather than on undergraduate education (Hazelkorn, 2013; Toma, 2009). Moreover, the indicators that are used to measure university performance are commonly developed without fully capturing the educational outcome that is in line with the original philosophy of higher education. Rather, many of the indicators skewed more towards positioning or improving university‟s image, status, and prestige at the national and global level, and their capability in generating more income and attaining commercial values (Carnegie and Tuck, 2010; Marginson, 2002; Toma, 2009). On the other hand, the original philosophy of higher education often places greater concern on participation in higher education, equity and equality issue, conservation of culture and values that are uniquely inherent to the society and nation as well as the importance of developing an individual as a good human being. Thus, greater concentration on the idea of market in coordinating university‟s operation may devalues the efforts to recognise the differences of philosophical orientation of public universities.
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Adult basic education as practical philosophy: an hermeneutic account

Adult basic education as practical philosophy: an hermeneutic account

THE LANGUAGE GAMES OF PRACTICAL PHILOSOPHY Thus, practical philosophy enters the classroom, not as a theory or doctrine, but as ethos or demeanors, as genres of address, as the movement [r]

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