Philosophy of the History of Philosophy

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A Redescriptive History of Humanism and Hermeneutics in African Philosophy

A Redescriptive History of Humanism and Hermeneutics in African Philosophy

From the above, it would be grasped that we need to pay at- tention to creation and formation of concepts in African phi- losophy. A crucial problem that we need to tackle now is the problem of alternative theories to humanism and hermeneutics in the history of African Philosophy. There are strong argu- ments in favour of the position that contemporary African phi- losophy is discontinuous with its ancient origins. It can no longer be denied, however, that most contemporary African philosophers have turned their attention to concepts and theo- ries formulated by ancient thinkers and have explored the rele- vance of these concepts to contemporary problems. In line with this observation, we present three major contemporary African philosophers who have explored the orisa intellectual culture to establish this continuity. These three philosophers have the same cultural background; Yoruba cultural background, but we in no way claim here that this cultural background is the only cultural background through which the redescriptive of African philosophy could be enacted; it is just one among many of such cultural background.
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The history of philosophy – an obituary?

The history of philosophy – an obituary?

Nevertheless, I’m not so sure that Kenny, the Wittgenstein sympathiser, has actually let himself down in refusing to pass over that of which he cannot speak into silence. After all, he offers his history of philosophy to his readers with the explicit caveat that in many cases he will ‘write of necessity as an amateur rather than an expert’ (xvi). It will be a cold day in hell before Anthony Kenny claims to be a Derrida expert, of course, so perhaps the lack of respect with which he treats Derrida’s work, as well as his lack of any acknowledgment he pays to Adorno, Bergson, Foucault, Deleuze and Rorty, to mention only five of the more obvious omissions, can perhaps be excused as the inevitable shortcomings of a history of philosophy written in an age of intellectual fragmentation and specialisation– an age he has diagnosed. In as much as one reviewer might take issue with the way in which Kenny has engaged with Derrida, so too another reviewer might well challenge the account of Plantinga with which he closes. Perhaps, in the end, it is asking too much of any single person, however much they have read and however carefully, to give an authoritative account of the history of philosophy. What Randall Collins and W.K.C. Guthrie said of their histories of philosophy, Anthony Kenny has no doubt also thought of his own: ‘it seemed better to finish the work in my own lifetime’ (Collins, 1998: xix).
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Bochenski and Balance: System and History in Analytic Philosophy

Bochenski and Balance: System and History in Analytic Philosophy

sign saying “No Exit” or “Dangerous Bend”. It can suggest solutions that with modification can be viable today: wheels that were first rolled out centuries ago need not be re-invented. If modern philosophers of mind had read Brentano and Husserl rather than Wittgenstein and Ryle they would have saved their subject years of detour. If Russell had read Paul of Venice he would have realised the Vicious Circle Principle was a tried and tested paradox-blocking solution. If Frege had done so he might even have avoided Russell’s Paradox in the first place. If Wittgenstein had known 18 th century botany he would not have though family resemblance classes were a marvellous new idea of his. The list can be extended. It is notable that the single most impressive advance to come out of the Polish school of logic, namely Tarski’s theory of truth, is deliberately set by Tarski in the context of Aristotle and the ancient semantic paradoxes. Tarski was no historian of logic or philosophy, but his teachers Kotarbiński and Łukasiewicz knew their history well. Historical knowledge can help a philosopher (or even better, team of philosophers) struggling with a problem to a less blinkered or restricted view as to what they might do.
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Kierkegaard's contribution to the philosophy of history

Kierkegaard's contribution to the philosophy of history

It is, of course, natural for every thinker to adopt their own vocabulary, but Hegel initiates a different logic as well. How, then, are we to translate Hegel‘s logical conclusions into a logic that he considers to be inherently inferior? What is more, one always has to be aware of Hegel‘s mixing of philosophical and theological terms. In his Introduction to the Lectures on the Philosophy of World History for example he uses ‗reason‘, ‗Idea‘ and ‗God‘ as synonyms. Again, although it is not unnatural for a philosopher to appropriate the concept of ‗God‘, Hegel tends to equate ‗God‘ with ‗reason‘ or with ‗Idea‘ or with ‗Absolute‘ without providing any explicit definition of any of these terms. Is ‗God‘ to be understood in the same way as it is understood in every Western Christian community or, at least, in every Western Protestant community? If yes, how can we explain Hegel‘s idiosyncratic interpretation of the ‗Incarnation‘? Of course, this is only to hint a problematic character which besets every interpretation of Hegel‘s thought: it is not the purpose of this thesis to solve this problem; yet it needs to be borne in mind in what follows. 17 Thus, there are not only many different interpretations of Hegel‘s philosophy, but many contradictory ones. 18 Some interpreters consider Hegel to be an exponent of ‗panlogism‘ (because he believes that ‗everything is rational‘), others believe him to be the father of ‗irrationalism‘ (because he uses a different kind of logic). Some define him as utterly religious and others
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Integrating History and Philosophy of Science

Integrating History and Philosophy of Science

From these figures alone one might conclude that the call for work that would integrate the history and philosophy of science in a meaningful way has gone, if not unheard, at least only faintly heard, since Feigl called for a change in attitude almost forty years ago. But there is one further place to look. 1996 saw the first meeting of a new international grouping, HOPOS, whose concern is with the history of the philosophy of science. Its growth since that first meeting at Virginia Tech has been truly meteoric. Meeting every two years, alternately in North America and Europe, it appears to have built up an academic constituency faster than its founders could ever have thought possible. At its last meeting, held in Paris in 2006, there were 68 sessions spread over five days, five sessions in parallel in most of the time periods. In all, a stunning 257 papers were presented. Though the US was well represented, as one would expect, what was most significant about this meeting was that the majority of the papers were presented by European scholars. It is clear that the historical dimension of the philosophy-of-science enterprise evokes an impressive degree of scholarly interest on both sides of the Atlantic. Its future in the academy seems secure. Learning philosophy through study of the history of philosophy has always been a favored route. It is all the more appropriate a way to proceed when one takes into account the historical nature of the sciences themselves and thus of the philosophical reflections that they have inspired over the ages. In at least one of the HPS doctoral programs in the US, a two-semester sequence in the history of the philosophy of science is a required part of the graduate program. HOPOS is well on its way.
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Experimental philosophy and the history of philosophy

Experimental philosophy and the history of philosophy

In ‘Experimental Philosophy and Philosophical Significance’, Knobe (2007) claims that the methods of experimental philosophers are more relevant than those of the analytic tradition to studying the mechanisms underlying various theoretical and practical capacities of human beings. What is more, still according to him, the attempt to understand these mechanisms is more characteristic of the long-term history of philosophy, and thus might have a stronger claim to be authentic philosophical research, than work in the analytic tradition. Knobe concedes that experimental philosophy may not have lasting relevance for the “analytic project,” except as a negative programme intended to deflate some of the claims that analytic philosophers have based on intuition, but he suggests that questions about human nature and cognition and more generally the mechanisms underlying intentionality, cognition and morality have been of interest in Western philosophy since Plato and Aristotle, and that philosophers as different from one another as Nietzsche and Hume have carried on this tradition.
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History of Substance in Philosophy

History of Substance in Philosophy

A lot of words investigated by philosophers get their inception for conventional or extra-philosophical dialect. Yet the idea of substance is basically a philosophical term of art. Its employments in normal dialect tend to derive, often in a twisted way, dif- ferent from its philosophical usage. Despite this, the idea of substance differs from philosophers, reliant upon the school of thought in which it is been expressed. There is an ordinary concept in play when philosophers discuss “substance”, and this is seen in the concept of object, or thing when this is contrasted with properties, attributes or events. There is also a difference in view when in the sense that while the realists would develop a materialistic theory of substance, the idealist would de- velop a metaphysical theory of substance. The problem surrounding substance spans through the history of philosophy. The queries have often been what is substance of? And can there be substance without its attributes? This paper tends to expose the historical problems surrounding substance. This paper criticizes the thinking which presupposes that there could be a substance without its attributes or substance exist- ing alone. This paper adopts complimentary ontology principles which state that for anything to exist, it must serve as a missing connection to reality. This suggests that everything interconnects to each other and substance cannot exist in isolation.
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Continental Philosophy Commons Esthetics Commons History of Philosophy Commons Metaphysics Commons Philosophy of Language Commons , and the Philosophy of Mind Commons

Continental Philosophy Commons Esthetics Commons History of Philosophy Commons Metaphysics Commons Philosophy of Language Commons , and the Philosophy of Mind Commons

Deleuze's foremost concern in his early work is to establish a transcendental field adequate to real experience (transcendental empiricism). Given this, when confronted with the metaphysical impasses involved in language's relation to both bodies and ideas, Deleuze finds in the dimension of expression (or sense) a third term capable of reconnecting the two great lost worlds of the history of philosophy, but without, for all that, producing a higher term, capable of unifying supposed opposites. The surface—the geographical avatar of the metaphysics of sense—inheres both to the body and to the Idea, but remains irreducible to each. It connects one to the other, and language to each. For Deleuze, thought's consistency, a way of thinking has an orientation before having an object; “...[tracing] dimensions before constructing systems.” (LoS, 127). The dimension of expression (sense) in language (which is at the same time, not merely linguistic, but is also the logical attribute of the body or state of affairs), presupposes a metaphysics of surface, an orientation on this surface. This metaphysics in turn presupposes a distinction between its philosophically traditional rivals, and the terms which correspond and are proper to them, since the surface does not exist independently of a depth and a height (or a body and a proposition). Thus, a brief elaboration of metaphysical depth, surface, and height will provide us with the necessary context for the common theme of sense in Wittgenstein and Deleuze.
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Quantum mechanics and Indian philosophies: A contribution to the history and philosophy of science

Quantum mechanics and Indian philosophies: A contribution to the history and philosophy of science

In this paper we have study four quantum experiments that challenge the “common sense” of reality. In fact, in the 20 th century, the emergence of Quantum Mechanics and Transpersonal Psychology have contributed to challenge our “common sense” about the vision of the world. It is true that scientific progress have allowed us an improvement in our day to day life, but the core of the questions that were raised in the Introduction of this paper, still remain to be answered by contemporary society, such as What is the role of the human being in the Universe (the choice of the observer)? How we could explain the exceptional capabilities of the human brain (telepathic communication)?What is the purpose of Life (the perception of Life)?.In this regard, Prigogine (Prigogine and Stengers, 1986). suggested “a new alliance” between science (physics, biology, chemistry) and humanities/social sciences (history, philosophy, psychology) in order to answer the previousquestions in a transdisciplinary and in a deeper way.
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Philosophy And History Of Science   Beyond The Kuhnian Paradigm pdf

Philosophy And History Of Science Beyond The Kuhnian Paradigm pdf

Instead, three alternative approaches to the relationship between philosophy and history of science have been sketched: Hacking’s account of styles of reasoning as a history of the prese[r]

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A survey of the literature of the philosophy of history

A survey of the literature of the philosophy of history

The fourth proposition o f his Idea of a Universal Histo states: "The means which nature employs to bring about the development of all the capacities implanted in men is their mutual ant[r]

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History and Philosophy of Science : An Analysis

History and Philosophy of Science : An Analysis

The environmental implications of simple living are significantly favorable. These implications occur through two channels. The first channel operates through the reduced i[r]

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History and Philosophy of Science: A Phylogenetic Approach

History and Philosophy of Science: A Phylogenetic Approach

In the last section I provided a small bit of a much more complex history, not as an end in itself, but as an example of how a phylogenetic analysis of a current problem in the foundations of evolutionary biology can help clarify the problem for philosophical purposes. The method I have used is to trace back historically to a point where the problem does not exist, and then work forward historically until one can see it beginning to emerge. As in this case, it is often true that at that point, those involved in the scientific debate will be quite self-conscious of problems that a couple of generations later are submerged as unquestioned, unanalyzed presuppositions of the field’s common set of concepts and methods. People see the problems, but cannot see the conceptual and methodological assumptions that are producing the problems. Nor, while working with those concepts and methods can they imagine any other way of approaching their subject that will avoid the problems they are facing.
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Introduction : photography between art history and philosophy

Introduction : photography between art history and philosophy

about photography, brings a fresh perspective to recent debates concern- ing agency and automatism by setting them within the context of founda- tional work on the concept of intention and the philosophy of action by Elisabeth Anscombe and Donald Davidson respectively. By doing so, Lopes shows that agency cannot simply be reduced to intention. Intention may require agency, but agency does not require intention. Thus it is pos- sible for agents to perform acts unintentionally. In Lopes’s example, Ham- let stabs the figure behind the arras intentionally, but he does not stab Polonius intentionally, though they are the same act under different de- scriptions—Polonius being the figure behind the arras. The gap that Lopes’s account opens up between agency and intention shows that stan- dard philosophical intuitions about the automatism of the photographic apparatus somehow compromising artistic agency with respect to photog- raphy only arise by running agency too close to intention. But Lopes shows that photographic agency can vary (indeed can be present or absent) while automatism is held constant; so agency and automatism need not be in competition. On the account to be preferred, a photographic process in- volves agency, irrespective of its mechanical or automatic dimensions, just in case it is intentional under some description.
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The 'battle' between science and religion over evolution in nineteenth century New Zealand : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in History at Massey University

The 'battle' between science and religion over evolution in nineteenth century New Zealand : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in History at Massey University

The themes articu l ated by Bowen were repeated by the foundation presi dents of the o ther Institutes as the ethos of co l on i a l s cience was estab l i shed. M r . Justice Ward 's attitude to science , as presi dent of the Otago Institute , was as pragmat ic and uti l itarian as Bowe n ' s . Sur v eying the history and phi l osophy o f sci ence from P l ato t o Hume h e asserted that it was 'our own great countryman' Franci s Bacon who showed that 'the highest end of wisdom is to be of use'. Ev ery n e w scienti fic disco v ery added a n e w source o f wea l th t o t h e co l ony and a fresh incenti v e to immigration.64 Al fred Eccles echoed this v iew to the same body l ater in the year. The most usefu l and pract i ca l end o f the Institutes , he decl ared , was t o obtain knowl edge o f t h e raw
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Chapter5Roman

Chapter5Roman

Greco- Roman comes from the blending of Greek, Hellenistic and Roman traditions..  Literature, Philosophy, and History.[r]

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Philosophy of Computer Science - Free Computer, Programming, Mathematics, Technical Books, Lecture Notes and Tutorials

Philosophy of Computer Science - Free Computer, Programming, Mathematics, Technical Books, Lecture Notes and Tutorials

Ceruzzi 1988, esp. pp. 265–270, contains a history of the phrase ‘computer science’. In a re- sponse to a letter that appeared in one of the earliest issues of Communications of the ACM, an editor (possibly Alan J. Perlis, whom we will meet again below) listed several, admittedly “facetious”, names, including ‘turingineering’, ‘turology’, ‘applied meta-mathematics’, and ‘ap- plied epistemology’ (DATA-LINK, 1958, p. 6). (The first two are puns on the name of Alan Turing, arguably the founder of the discipline, whom we will discuss in Chapter 8. We’ll come back to “applied epistemology” in §3.14.4, below.) In 1966, Peter Naur (a winner of the Turing Award) suggested ‘datalogy’ (Naur, 2007, p. 86). A useful discussion of these terms can be found in Arden 1980, pp. 5–7, “About Names and Labels”. Abrahams 1987, p. 473, says: “My personal definition of the field and its name would be ‘computology: the study of computational processes and the means by which they may be realized.’ But alas, the name ‘computer science,’ like OS/360 Job Control Language, will probably persist until the sun grows cold.”
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A Scientometric Study Of The Journal Of Philosophy Of Education

A Scientometric Study Of The Journal Of Philosophy Of Education

g., Lawani (1986). Journals within the field of Education are often analyzed in order to determine publication patterns of a certain country (Madrid, Jiménez-Fanjul, León-Mantero, and Maz-Machado, 2017), or of a certain research field (Earp, 2010; Jamai, Md Zain, Samsudin and Ale Ebrahim, 2015). In Maz-Machado et al. (2015) diverse international investigations within the field of Education, are reviewed with scientometric approach. The largest international study analyzing journals within the Education field was carried out by Fairbairn et al. (2009), who studied 1042 journals from 15 international databases and 26 disciplines in the field of Education. Due to the interest and relevance of the studies addressing Education journals, we consider that it is important to identify publication patterns across significant journals of this field. Thus, we present a scientometric study of the Journal of Philosophy of Education, a journal which has had presence in the JCR during the last 20 years in the categories Education and Educational Research and History of Social Sciences.
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Evaluation of the effectiveness of a tertiary course delivered via the World Wide Web : the case of the 86 761 course   "Learning with computers" : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master in Education at Masse

Evaluation of the effectiveness of a tertiary course delivered via the World Wide Web : the case of the 86 761 course "Learning with computers" : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master in Education at Massey University

History of Pages Visited Foreword Course Staff History of Pages Visited History of Pages Visited Course Outline History of Pages Visited Course Philosophy History of Pages Visited Course[r]

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Discourses on the existence of african philosophy

Discourses on the existence of african philosophy

philosophers placing professional critics of ethno philosophy and they are also forming another form of ethno philosophy (A.P.J.Roux, 2003). Therefore, the debate held between Wiredu and Oruka, Mudimbe and Negebauer show that, African philosophers are going on in the area of doing philosophy. Mudimbe argued that African thoughts don’t have originality and mostly conditioned by the system which are not African (April A. Gordon). However for me, Mudimbe was wrong in this regard because different forms of African cultures like oral narratives, poems and myths serves as the source of African philosophical thoughts. Through carful and systematic examinations of Africans culture, practices, beliefs and different forms of oral narratives, tales, poems and the like philosophers can develop philosophy. For example, a man called Callicott, develop environmental philosophy through careful examination of the oral traditions of South American peoples and he called it Ojibwa. These are not seen by Mudimbe. Again, Mudimbe was wrong when he says that, African thoughts need originality and particularly conditioned by the systems of the westerns. For me, Africans history and philosophy were as old as before the arrivals of Europeans into the African continent. If there is peoples that were live in a specific area, then these peoples also develops its own culture, history, and practices. In fact, following the arrivals of the European in the African land it will lead to the assimilations of cultures, belief and
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