Pope Gregory the Great

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'Gregory the Great as "Apostle of the English" in Post Conquest Canterbury'

'Gregory the Great as "Apostle of the English" in Post Conquest Canterbury'

Until the eleventh century there was a broad consensus that Pope Gregory the Great, a saint whose bodily relics were not claimed by any English church, was the ‘ apostle of the English ’. Gregory had played a guiding role in the conversion of the English. 34 In 596, driven by the belief that it was his duty to ensure that all peoples had received the Gospel before the impending apocalypse, he chose Augustine, then a monk at the monastery of St Andrew in Rome, to head a mission to convert the Anglo-Saxons. After some prevarication and delay, Augustine arrived in England in 597, having been consecrated a bishop at Arles. Within four years, he had secured the conversion of Æthelberht, the king of Kent, and set about creating a struc- ture for the new English Church, establishing his cathedral at Canterbury, the leading city in Æthelberht’s kingdom. This cathedral later became a metropolitan see when the Roman mission to England was unable to realise Gregory the Great’s plan of making London the seat of the southern of England’s two provinces. Augustine also began building the monastery out- side the walls of the city which would later come to be known as St Augustine’s. It was here that he was buried when he died in about 604.
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Through the eye of the dragon: An examination of the artistic patronage of Pope Gregory XIII (1572 1585)

Through the eye of the dragon: An examination of the artistic patronage of Pope Gregory XIII (1572 1585)

The setting out of a doctrinal position on relics and how they should be treated implicates the significance of relics to Christianity and draws on the theology of Gregory the Great. In accounts of the translatio of the relics of Gregory Nazianzeno and its visual representation in the Terza Loggia, it is apparent that treatment of these relics complied with the treatment promulgated in the decrees. Relics were said to perform a special class of miracles and this is why they had to be protected. It was the purpose of such miracles performed by the relics of a saint to give testimony that the saint is alive with the Lord. 57 The doctrine on relics recognised that relics are not just a part of ‘popular’ devotional practices but are instead a fundamental part of the theology of the resurrection, redemption, and salvation. The arrival of a relic at a new site, for example, would be the occasion for miracles of healing and other signs of grace. This doctrine informs an alternative interpretation of the small vignettes featuring acts kindness in Gregory XIII’s fresco cycle of the translatio of Gregory Nazianzeno in the Terza Loggia to that offered by Gianni Pittiglio (Fig. 3.29). 58 He interprets the vignettes as a response to the Protestant position on justification through faith alone. He indicates that: ‘L’inserimento di scene di carità può essere strettamente connesso ad una delle dispute teologiche che oppongono cattolici e protestanti: la diatriba sulla giustificazione.’ A close examination of the doctrine on relics indicates that the acts of kindness featured in the frescoes may have been precipitated by the miraculous power of the relic, imparting grace as it proceeded along the route as evidenced by eyewitness testimony of mystical experiences. 59 This interpretation emphasizes the power of the relic, while Pittiglio’s interpretation emphasizes the Tridentine response to the Protestant position on justification, in its promotion of good deeds. The visual record the translatio of Gregorio Nazianzeno is documented in detail for posterity and as such it seems more plausible that the power of the relic would be invoked as an immutable belief of the Catholic Church. It can of course be interpreted as an
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Pope Gregory VII  1073 1085

Pope Gregory VII 1073 1085

The one thing demonstrably consistent in Gregory, to put over against that flexibility, was religious faith: a faith fed (to follow the testimony of Guido of Ferrara, otherwise a strong critic) by constant prayer, the reading of the Bi ble (which Gregory knew well and often quoted, Jeremiah and the Pauline epistles being prominent), and daily Mass, celebrated (Guido wrote) 'with tears in his eyes'. Like the faith of Gregory VII's model, Gregory the Great, this was a faith diffusivum sui, self-diffusing. Not only was the pope generous with time and care for people with problems ('No one ever went empty away who approached him for a hearing', according to the same Guido). Where Gregory the Great had diffused his faith largely by p reaching and dispatching missionaries, Gregory VII sought to reactivate the church as a structure, which he saw currently sunk into near-identity with secular society. The salt had lost its savour. Central to this restoration project was Christ's commis sion to St Peter, whose duty and authority to 'feed my sheep' Gregory VII understood as passing to all bishops of Rome. (As a Roman, we may add, Gregory would have been more than ever attached to St Peter because of the age-old bond which held every Itali an city to its saintly patron). Gregory believed he was the vicar of St Peter on earth, if not yet, quite, in any official writings at least, vicar directly of Christ (a papal title only permanently established from Innocent III's time).
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TheFormationofWesternEurope.pdf

TheFormationofWesternEurope.pdf

Reform was slow, starting in 910 CE when the Benedictine monastery was founded in a place called Cluny, France. The monks in Cluny strictly followed Benedictine rule, and soon other monasteries were founded across Western Europe — by the year 1000 CE, there were over 300 monasteries of a similar belief. In 1098 CE, another order was founded, the Cistercian monks, and their life of hardship won them many followers, causing further reforms. These reforms reached as far as the papacy, where Pope Leo IX began enforcing Church laws against simony and celibacy. Pope Gregory VII, who took office after Leo IX, spent time at Cluny studying, and was determined to purify the Church.
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James Gregory : a survey of his work in mathematical analysis

James Gregory : a survey of his work in mathematical analysis

share in these advancements. Two great mathematicians of the time were associated with the University - John Napier, who was a student at St.Salvator•s College for a year about 15 & 3 , and James Gregory, who held the chair of mathematics from 1668 to 1674- The neune of Napier has been kindly used by posterity and his memory honoured by the tercentenary congress of 1914 , while that of Gregory is best known when attached to a series appearing in elementary trigonometry. It would be irrelevant here to contrast their respective contributions to mathematics, but there is no doubt that while Napier lived in St.Andrews for a short time only and made his discoveries in after years,
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Essays on the macroeconomics of the great recession

Essays on the macroeconomics of the great recession

The baseline model in this paper treats the industrialised world as a large, closed economy, with a view to explaining a global trend. The world is of course composed of many economies which are open to trade in goods and financial assets with each other as well as with emerging markets. For any one of these countries, foreign assets are an important store of value, such that we might expect the external position of any given economy to depend on the domestic relative price of its capital goods. The real interest rate in any given country may accordingly not depend to a great extent on the relative price of capital goods in that country, even if the interest rate and the relative price of capital goods are linked at a global level. Furthermore, testing the implications of the model presented above is hampered by the fact that, at a global level, we only have one very short time series when time is denominated in model units, whereas an open-economy version will lend itself to testing along the cross-country dimension. Last but not least, the low-frequency behaviour of the current account dynamics is of independent interest.
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The Economics behind the Social Thought of Pope Francis

The Economics behind the Social Thought of Pope Francis

In Laudato Si’ Pope Francis has pulled together major themes from the information channelled to the Vatican before and after the Global Financial Crisis, particularly from the advice of leading experts and economists. The Bishop of Rome aimed to help mobilise world opinion behind efforts to tackle global warming and preserve the environment; to focus concern on global poverty and hunger—particularly in support of the UN Sustainable Development Goals; and to critique very strongly the unjust results of globalisation, with extreme inequalities and the amoral assumptions in certain forms of economics. He applauded environmental education that included a ‘critique of the “myths” of modernity grounded in a utilitarian mindset (individualism, unlimited progress, competition, consumerism, the unregulated market)’ (210).
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Hunting with a Bow and Arrow   Saxton Pope pdf

Hunting with a Bow and Arrow Saxton Pope pdf

No sound of the dogs was heard, but pressing forward we followed the boulder-strewn bottom of the creek for a mile or more, almost despairing of ever finding them, when suddenly we came upon a strange sight. There was the pack in a circle about a big reclining oak. They were voiceless and utterly exhausted, but sat watching a huge lion crouched on a great overhanging limb of the tree. The moment we appeared they raised a feeble, hoarse yelp of delight. The panther turned his head, saw us, sprang from the tree with a prodigious bound, landed on the side hill, tore down the canyon, and leaped over a precipice below. The dogs, heartened by our presence, with instant accord charged after the lion. When they came to the precipitous drop in the bed of the stream, they whined a second, ran back and forth, then mounted the lateral wall, circled sidewise and, by a detour, gained the ground below. We ran and looked over. The drop was at least thirty feet. The cat had taken it without hesitation, but we were absolutely stalled. Even if we had cared to take the risk of the descent, we saw so many similar drops beyond that the situation was hopeless. The dogs having lost their voices, we were at a great disadvantage. So we returned to the tree to rest and meditate.
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Opus Dei and its arrival in Australia and New Zealand : a thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy in Religious Studies at Massey University

Opus Dei and its arrival in Australia and New Zealand : a thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy in Religious Studies at Massey University

On the 28 November 1982, when the Work was made a Personal Prelature, the Holy" Father, Pope John Paul 11, appointed him the Prelate of Opus Dei.. On 6 January 1991 the Pope ordained him[r]

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Sacred Earth : the evolution of the Catholic Church's teaching on care for creation and how ordinary Catholics are hearing the call

Sacred Earth : the evolution of the Catholic Church's teaching on care for creation and how ordinary Catholics are hearing the call

A key theme of Pope Benedict’s message was an emphasis on God’s love. God created the world in love and made a covenant with human beings that if they live with faith and love, they will share an eternal destiny. The way humans treat the environment “should mirror the creative love of God, from whom we come and towards whom we are journeying,” Pope Benedict wrote (2010, para. 1). “The environment must be seen as God’s gift to all people, and the use we make of it entails a shared responsibility for all humanity, especially the poor and future generations” (Pope Benedict XVI, 2010, para. 2). Nature has an intrinsic value and can lead people to further knowledge of God. “Contemplating the beauty of creation inspires us to recognize the love of the Creator, that Love which ‘moves the sun and the other stars,’” the pope said (2010, para. 2).
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Western_Heritage-Chapter11-Reformation.pdf

Western_Heritage-Chapter11-Reformation.pdf

In response to the Protestant Reformation, Pope Paul III led a vigorous reform movement within the Catholic Church. Pope Paul III set out to revive the moral authority of the Church and [r]

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[J900.Ebook] Get Free Ebook Principles Of Economics 7th Edition By N Gregory Mankiw Not Textbook Access Code Only By N Gregory Mankiw.pdf

[J900.Ebook] Get Free Ebook Principles Of Economics 7th Edition By N Gregory Mankiw Not Textbook Access Code Only By N Gregory Mankiw.pdf

(Not Textbook, Access Code Only) By N. Gregory Mankiw as recommendations, visiting browse the title as well as style in this website is readily available. You will certainly find even more great deals publications Principles Of Economics 7th Edition By N. Gregory Mankiw (Not Textbook, Access Code Only) By N. Gregory Mankiw in numerous disciplines. You could likewise as soon as feasible to check out the book that is already downloaded. Open it and also save Principles Of Economics 7th Edition By N. Gregory Mankiw (Not Textbook, Access Code Only) By N. Gregory Mankiw in your disk or gizmo. It will reduce you wherever you need guide soft file to read. This Principles Of Economics 7th Edition By N. Gregory Mankiw (Not Textbook, Access Code Only) By N. Gregory Mankiw soft file to check out can be reference for every person to enhance the skill and capability.
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Gender and violence in Gregory of Tours' 'Decem libri historiarum'

Gender and violence in Gregory of Tours' 'Decem libri historiarum'

The inclusion of Clothild in this triptych gives pause for thought. However, there are Biblical precedents for a woman to call for righteous warfare. The best known is Esther, who persuaded her husband to make war on those who had threatened to destroy her own people. 82 A closer analysis of Gregory‟s triptych also makes clear that, while the first two women incite violence which causes chaos within a family – between brothers in the first case and between a father and son in the second – Chlotild persuades her sons to avenge her by attacking another kingdom. The Burgundian campaign is one which contributes to the eventual uniting of Gaul under the rulership of a single Merovingian dynasty. In this, she is very much the counterpart of her husband, who also appears to use morally questionable means to achieve his ends, and this episode is part of Gregory‟s characterisation of her as a fine woman whose ambitions, like those of Clovis, were for the unity of Gaul. Clovis‟s conduct has also drawn comment for its ambiguity, but Gregory‟s position is really quite clear, given his feelings on Gallic unity and civil wars. As he tells us in the preface to Bk. V, it is really no wonder that the kings of his own time experience such difficulties when, rather than directing their energies against outside enemies as their ancestors had done, they quarrel amongst themselves and fail to respect the churches. 83
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The classical and the grotesque in the work of Alexander Pope and Jonathan Swift

The classical and the grotesque in the work of Alexander Pope and Jonathan Swift

Introduction The classical body and aesthetics Classical structures: time and space Toward the modern classical The Grotesque Classical Reception The carnivalesque The World Turned Upsid[r]

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Theodoret's theologian : assessing the origin and significance of Gregory of Nazianzus’ title

Theodoret's theologian : assessing the origin and significance of Gregory of Nazianzus’ title

It is precisely the recovery of this particularity that the foregoing study has sought to achieve. In the first case it has been concerned to demonstrate that many commonly circulated descriptions of the source and significance of Gregory’s title are incomplete or incorrect. While it does appear in the Acts of the Council of Chalcedon, and does date to 451 the title is used only in florilegia in the Address to Marcion. The Address is one of several extra-conciliar documents appended to the minutes to form the Acts, and is probably attributable to Theodoret of Cyrrhus. Going beyond this, the study has also sought to present a model of why Theodoret may have chosen to apply this particular title to Gregory. If the foregoing is valid, then it suggests two distinct stages for the reception of Gregory’s work in the years after his death.
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Pope Francis's Call for Social Justice in the Global Economy

Pope Francis's Call for Social Justice in the Global Economy

disciples’ feet not in St Peter’s or the Basilica of St John Lateran, the official seat of the Bishop of Rome, with great crowds and choirs, but in a Rome juvenile prison. To the consternation of some liturgists and against the rubrics, he washed and kissed the feet not of the usual twelve clerics, but of twelve prisoners, including two young women, and of Muslims as well. Some critics have accused the pope of staging media stunts. What they did not realise is that Bergoglio also performed the Holy Thursday ceremony in prisons back in Buenos Aires.
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A Comparison of the Christological Praxis of Søren Kierkegaard and Pope Francis

A Comparison of the Christological Praxis of Søren Kierkegaard and Pope Francis

Though Kierkegaard believes that being a true Christian requires more than knowing, faith is nonetheless essentially grounded in the realization (thought) that one is completely indeb[r]

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Study protocol: PoPE Prediction of Preterm delivery by Electrohysterography

Study protocol: PoPE Prediction of Preterm delivery by Electrohysterography

de Lau et al BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 2014, 14 192 http //www biomedcentral com/1471 2393/14/192 STUDY PROTOCOL Open Access Study protocol PoPE Prediction of Preterm delivery by Electrohysterograp[.]

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Review article: ‘Popes and Jews’ and ‘Pope Innocent II’

Review article: ‘Popes and Jews’ and ‘Pope Innocent II’

Iberia: Castile-León, Aragon, Navarre, Catalonia and Portugal, at a time when their rulers were beginning to claim for themselves royal (and imperial) titles. Smith criticizes the assumption that up until the mid-12th century the papacy denied royal titles to the various new Iberian kings in order to build support around Castile-León and then, in the second half of the 12th century, slowly accepted the status of these new kings. (8) In fact, Smith points out, Innocent II also denied the title ‘emperor’ to Alfonso VII of Castile-León. Simply: the papacy denied all sorts of new titles to Iberian rulers because they did not come from the pope. It seems that it was papal authority which was at issue. This is a good argument, and it is clinched by the fact that the papal court did not accord Alfonso VII his favoured title either. But one could take this emphasis on the agency of the self-proclaimed kings further. We should recognize that the reason why kings did not request their titles from the papacy was because they did not always see the papacy as the most attractive legitimator for new titles. Clearly when there was a powerful imperial hegemon on the peninsula (Alfonso VII, Imperator totius Hispaniae, d.1157) he was the best source of legitimacy (for lesser kings). Likewise papal approval was probably less desirable during a schism when the legitimacy of either pope was uncertain (so between 1130–8 and 1159–78). A comparison can be made with the Bohemian kings, who sought
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A Meta CSP Model for Optimal Planning

A Meta CSP Model for Optimal Planning

University of Huddersfield Repository Gregory, Peter, Long, Derek and Fox, Maria A Meta­CSP Model for Optimal Planning Original Citation Gregory, Peter, Long, Derek and Fox, Maria (2007) A Meta­CSP Mo[.]

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