Practice-led art research

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Review of practice led research in art, design & architecture

Review of practice led research in art, design & architecture

Finally John Lindsay’s project “Green and Smart” indicates that there is interesting work that has yet to connect fully with the academic arena. Lindsay and others have conducted a long-term examination of urban mapping and notations that could engender a shift in behaviour in favour of “greener” travel. This work has been exhibited and demonstrated to a wide variety of audiences but it has yet to have impact in either the professional or academic arenas. It examines the relationship between information design and the institutions of engineering, planning, politics and arguably it fits well with the current interest in interdisciplinary research and practice. While Lindsay’s propositions may be difficult to “sell” in the short-term environment of professional practice they could find more fertile soil in an academic setting as long as the protagonists are able to frame their work in terms that will be recognised by the wider community of academics. While we might sympathise with Paul Reader’s rejection of conventional structures it is arguable that practice-led
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Practice led research into key Buddhist concepts in contemporary art

Practice led research into key Buddhist concepts in contemporary art

Chapter 3 will discuss the Sanjusangendo photographs of Hiroshi Sugimoto and examine the relationship of the image content, the symbolic content, the installation, and the experience of [r]

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Illumination through illustration: Positioning illustration as practice led research

Illumination through illustration: Positioning illustration as practice led research

To tackle the issue of typecasting of the illustrator, the machinations underpinning it need to be understood. There are numerous pressures on illustrators, educators and agencies to maintain the position of style as the marker of an illustrator’s identity. Bowman is pragmatic about the need for illustrators to pay the rent and continue to work according to these demands, therefore his exhortations are directed at developing supplementary critical activities. Illustration agencies (such as figures 18 and 19) and illustrators’ own websites promote style divorced from subject matter, as they need to show that an illustrator is appropriate for a range of potential tasks. Therefore online portfolios frequently show images out of context, with no indication of the work’s purpose, scale, or location (other than perhaps the client’s name if it confers cultural capital). The result of this is that the images cannot be evaluated for their efficacy in relation to their original purpose; their role has been stripped back to demonstrate a style to potential clients. This is what industry looks like at the moment, and those eager to join it are aware of this. Students are particularly impressionable, and have specific expectations of what looks like illustration and strive to meet them 9 . This phenomenon is noted by Mills & Goodall (2012, p12) who suggest that the perception is likely fuelled by the impending weight of pressure to find success within the industry in order to pay back student debts. Undoubtedly, the increasing pressure of the ‘employability agenda’ within Higher Education also plays a role in perpetuating this status quo. Mills & Goodall also attribute stylistic appropriation to basic admiration, with influence taking the form of a stylistic veneer overlaying the student’s work, but troublingly they identify the influential practitioners as the tutors… and the options for breaking out of this cannibalistic cycle of style become narrower. Richardson (2012) spoke of an instance of an art director using his work to mock up a proposal for a client, and using this to brief him: “so I’ve already been given back my own work”. There is clearly an expectation of that medium and style being a reflection of what he does, and what he will produce. Klimowski (2012) notes that financial and
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Tenebris in lux : the performance of code and the aesthetics of transmission in contemporary art through practice orientated research

Tenebris in lux : the performance of code and the aesthetics of transmission in contemporary art through practice orientated research

The estrangement from important others (friends, family) I had often experienced – perhaps due to a nomadic existence and therefore having adopted the habit of the outsider – was taken to an extreme. Feeling responsible, I had a deep-seated and helpless sensation that I had abandoned these people, these new friends I had left behind. My thoughts were nebulous, my mind confused and every once in a while frightful; but my spirit felt alive, although everything I had thought had profoundly changed. Eventually the strategies that trapped my perception and desire became less transient, and my need to make aesthetic decisions, based on steadfast rules, asserted itself; instead of being nihilistic, I was making assessments that had more clarity and led to stable outcomes. I had not previously been as consciously in the world as I was then. But at the same time things started floating; I was losing connection with real life. Everything I had taken for granted until then took a turn and marked the realm beyond the demands of survival. I felt dead and alive at the same time. I thought I understood more of what ʻbeingʼ was possibly about.
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A practice-led inquiry into the use of still images as a tool for reflective practice and organisational inquiry.

A practice-led inquiry into the use of still images as a tool for reflective practice and organisational inquiry.

The term ‘Provenance,’ taken from the French provenir, "to come from", is drawn from discourse about art and antiques. Provenance signifies the life story of an item or collection and a record of its ultimate derivation and its passage through the hands of its various owners. In this paper, we are using the term to suggest that a practice has Provenance in the form of a general and a personal history. The general history is evident in the documented origins and an evolution of that practice available through the mainstream literature. The personal history illuminates the way in which the practice has evolved for a specific practitioner. It draws on the experiences in their professional development that enabled them to develop this practice and may include publications written by the practitioners themselves. Since introducing the notion of Provenance into our inquiry work, we have found the term similarly used to describe the exploration of the literature informing research and writing about reflexive practice (Finlay 2002). We are also cognisant of the traction this term has gained in other disciplines, such as agriculture, in which it is used to identify where produce originates. We propose that Provenance is a reflective practice tool that scaffolds a practitioner to recognise the elements and experiences that have contributed to their knowledge and acquisition of a practice.
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A visual thesis? techniques for reporting practice led research

A visual thesis? techniques for reporting practice led research

Taking account of this we believed that visual media should play a significant role in the thesis but we had no real scheme for making this work. Much of the debate about forms of thesis in Art and Design starts with the assumption that a "body of creative work" would be best examined through an exhibition and this approach, which is explicitly provided for in some university regulations, is widely used in Fine Art, usually through a combination of exhibition and text. These two elements may be complementary or the text may be used to provide a commentary on the work. Neither approach is satisfactory - the first can lead to confusion about the relationship of theory and practice, we have heard research students state that "my work is 50% theory and 50% practice", and both approaches raise the problem of providing a permanent record of the research, sufficient for others to understand fully what happened.
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Art Practice as Research: A Global Perspective

Art Practice as Research: A Global Perspective

create, reflect upon, and speak about their artwork in the following ways: (1) Students began the creative process by researching artistic forms, contemporary artists, and NSW students’ HSC artwork, noting processes and ideas in order to reflect upon and subsequently develop concepts for their own work. This subject matter made interdisciplinary connections to issues and philosophical ideas. (2) These connections led to students’ conceptual and metaphorical exploration that conveyed powerful meanings and asked further questions. Students linked their art making research to their own knowledge and experience to make personal discoveries and see the world in new ways. (3) Using annotated images and written reflection, students documented their art making process in VAPDs that were brainstorming and problem-solving spaces acting as points of visual and written communication. Within the VAPDs students revisited and planned ideas, reflected, and came to new conclusions. (4) Students used the frames as metacognitive devices to become aware of the lenses through which they viewed their work. They used the conceptual framework as a reminder of the world’s influences on their artwork and of the audience who would view it. (5) Within teacher case study handouts and their artist research, students analyzed artists’ material choices, compositions, and practices and linked them to concepts. Students analyzed and reflected upon their own material practices and decisions, documenting them in their VAPDs and summarizing them in their artist statements.
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Review of practice led research in art, design & architecture

Review of practice led research in art, design & architecture

I know that I have a rather divergent style when it comes to these kind of events, an it must at times be infuriating to those who seek to converge on one issue. Likewise I in turn have to resist reading convergence as attempts to shut down questions that I sense should be left open for dwelling on longer. I would also like to apologise for not being able to read every post in depth during the conference, like others I have had to dip in and out to maintain business as usual, if not with my PhD, then with clients (the joys of private enterprise!) I must admit when I signed up for this conference I had no idea I would get so involved, I’m not even sure exactly why I did, but perhaps there is a strong consonance between my own doctoral research into painting as learning within adult education and what is happening with this problem of practice-led research. I would foreshadow my PhD submission by identifying that for adult education painting can be indicative of what I see as a new “silent paradigm” of learning. As Ken has pointed out learning is not research, but I see the possibility of working from a learning paradigm to a research paradigm as probably more a matter of time, and given enough time (though not in my thesis!) there could be a possibility for something like ineffable research, if it does not already exist somewhere.
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Priority setting in research: user led mental health research

Priority setting in research: user led mental health research

Following on from a short introductory session, participants were divided into three groups, who visited 6 workstations in rotation. Base around the main theme of that workstation, at each ‘workstation’ , participants brainstormed and generated research ideas (as a form of mind mapping/collaborative activity). With every member of the group being given the chance to voice their ideas out loud, which was then recorded by the scribe. Each workstation took a similar format where the facilitator introduced the workstation theme and, along with the scribe, encouraged participants to discuss and generate ideas. These ideas were distilled as the discussions progressed and refined into research questions or ideas to be taken forward. Taking direction from the participants, the ‘ workstation ’ scribe transferred the research questions and ideas onto a flipchart. Upon completion of the workstation phase, three voting rounds were then held in order that the final research priorities could be declared and ultimately taken forward as suitable research topics by the RDG.
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Rediscovering the Art of Nursing for Nursing Practice

Rediscovering the Art of Nursing for Nursing Practice

This study used a phenomenological approach to discover the lived experiences of the art of nursing from nurses. Eleven interviews were completed from September through November of 2017. At the time of the interviews, eight participants worked as nurse educators, one came from a university setting and seven came from community college settings. The three remaining nurses worked in the hospital setting. Participants ranged in age from 41 to over 61. Their years of experience as a nurse ranged from 21 years to over 30 years. Of these nurses, one held the BSN degree, one the PhD degree, and the remaining held the MSN degree. All participants were female. Participants were currently practicing registered nurses. The nursing backgrounds of the participants included a range of experiences: hospice, acute care, nurse management, pediatrics, labor and delivery, medical/surgical, mother/baby, intensive care, progressive care, outpatient day surgery, free standing clinic, cardiac surgical step down, outpatient hemodialysis, nursing instructor, neonatal intensive care, prison nurse, telemetry, school nursing, emergency room, hospital nursing education, orthopedics, post-op, chemotherapy, behavioral health, long term care, code team, and one had been a family nurse practitioner in a rural setting.
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Sound as art : the rise of the corporeal and noise in twentieth century art practice

Sound as art : the rise of the corporeal and noise in twentieth century art practice

What becomes apparent in what I understand to be the non-musical approach of artists like Kaprow and Young is an abandonment of musical constructs in the pursuit of a wider understanding of meaning for sound in the arts. Unsurprisingly then, it is in the fields of visual art and performance art where some of the most enthusiastic adherents of the sound-as-art approach can be found. As the following chapters will show, non-musical artists would prove instrumental in promoting sound-as-art as an alternative to experimentation involving the extension of existing musical systems. Furthermore, similar to the corporeal foregrounding in Futurism and Dada, the performative mode would continue to play its role of announcing this new vanguard to the wider public. The next chapter will shed light on the importance of the performance-oriented Fluxus movement and explain the vital role of the visual arts in cementing sound-as-idea as a concept. In discussing this concept I will reveal how the expanded field branches out beyond the physical into the conceptual.
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The Art of Conscious Practice: Mastering Medicine

The Art of Conscious Practice: Mastering Medicine

The whole idea of conscious practice being proposed, is to have things done and decision made more consciously and with focus. Practising consciously is about being aware of everything that has a bearing on our actions, purpose, values and goals. The conscious mind is logical. It is able to think, reason, select, discriminate, plan and perform many more functions. The important thing to note is that the conscious mind can only perform one thing at a time. It cannot do two things simultaneously, e.g. give instructions to a nurse and read the patient’s charts, at the same time. Scientists have also found that the brain has a finite amount of space for tasks requiring attention. Learning to drive is a good example of how difficult it is for the conscious mind to do many things, all at once (2, 6–8). The conscious mind has will and has a sense of awareness. Will, is the ability of the conscious mind to direct a thought or action.
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Paramedics, poetry, and film: health policy and systems research at the intersection of theory, art, and practice

Paramedics, poetry, and film: health policy and systems research at the intersection of theory, art, and practice

Imagining possibilities through poetry and film: what are the implications for health policy and systems research? So, how then might arts-based methodologies such as poetry and film offer new ways of influencing policy and research? Beyond recognizing that the lived experience and narratives of healthcare workers are legitimate forms of data, we also need to find ways to center them in policy making and research processes. Creative methods may help us do both.

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Organising undergraduate research projects: Student-led and academic-led models

Organising undergraduate research projects: Student-led and academic-led models

In the context of increasing student numbers and staff workload in higher education, there has been a move to streamline assessments and improve assessment processes that are sometimes deemed unsatisfactory (e.g., Harrison & Mears, 2013). Most undergraduate degree structures incorporate a large high-credit piece of coursework in the form of a capstone dissertation or project, which often takes considerable time and resources to manage. Rather than address the challenges around undergraduate dissertations, some social science and health degrees have instead abandoned the requirement for an empirical project, despite suggestions that they form a key role in facilitating active learning and in developing students as researchers (Healey, Jordan, Pell and Short, 2010). Some programmes require students to simply design a project; Others allow literature based dissertations. Nevertheless, the UK Quality Assurance Agency for higher education (QAA) which oversees and regulates all degree programmes, states in its 2008 guidelines that successful undergraduate students will typically have shown that they have the skills necessary to carry out a research project. This case study considers undergraduate research dissertation systems. The paper is not intended as an empirical study, rather we use a conceptual framework based on motivation and interest (Hidi and Renninger, 2006) to help explain why we think some systems work better than others.
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The Application of Photoconductive Bacteriostatic Infrared-LED for footwear in Environmental Art Installation

The Application of Photoconductive Bacteriostatic Infrared-LED for footwear in Environmental Art Installation

Background: With an increase in the trend of using high-tech for renewable energy, the storage and conversion of solar energy become increasingly popular. Rather than getting high benefits of electricity, other important issues are how to bring the considerate service and pleasures for the daily home life. The popularization and application of modern materials and creative beauty of demand by design were integrated with each other. Objective: This project combines different research fields of architecture and environments art, and optoelectronics technology to develop a trans- boundary new product. We proposed an apparatus to improve the hygiene of internal space of footwear and apply the green technology in daily life; moreover, the designs of the apparatus were also demonstrated beautiful fashion whether in day or night, and coordinate with the environment each other. The origin concept the art installations was form the most well-known of "photosynthesis" in the nature, completing the absorbing carbon dioxide and releasing oxygen in a cycle by a tree itself. Results: The shoes can hang on branches of this tree; leaves were modified by soft solar panel to absorb solar energy; the use of dual-wavelength infrared-LED design plays a role in sanitation of the shoes; and the part of flowerpot is the base of solar energy storage and control unit. The figure of the apparatus was bionics based on a plant to show the elegance. Conclusion: In the future, the installation will move towards the development of design integration with balcony, in order to form the shoes combined with solar collector panels, providing three-dimensional green day automatic irrigation system with night scene mural shiny facade. In order to reduce costs to achieve commercialization of new environmental art being provided
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The influence of context on the handmade ceramic vessel: A practice-led investigation into the potential of wheel-thrown vessels within the restaurant and art gallery environments

The influence of context on the handmade ceramic vessel: A practice-led investigation into the potential of wheel-thrown vessels within the restaurant and art gallery environments

The work of ceramic artist Geert Lap informed my thinking about the ceramic vessel and abstraction at this time. Lapʼs work explores the aesthetic potential of the wheel-thrown form and surface outside the tradition of utility (Fig. 20). Some of his forms reference familiar objects, such as the bowl, while others borrow from the language of industry, for example: funnels or speaker cones. His work stretches our perception of the kinds of vessel forms that can be made utilizing the potterʼs wheel, however, they still maintain a direct connection to the tradition of the handmade vessel as they are consistently round and maintain the potential for containment. As with Stair, Hanssen Pigott and Coelhoʼs work, Lapʼs work creates a situation of tension and ambiguity; the vessel form is familiar but how they operate within the art gallery context is less so. In this space, Lapʼs work functions to explore abstract ideas about combinations of ceramic form and colour. In an interview with Erik Beenker, designer Benno Premsela asks the questions “What should we call these objects? Are they vases or are they sculptures? It is a difficult subject, this transition of being between functional and nonfunctional, a riddle.” 66 This type of questioning of the
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Practice-led Professional Doctorates: the potential for Kent & Medway

Practice-led Professional Doctorates: the potential for Kent & Medway

In the broader context of Europe, higher education has been influence by the Bologna Process, started in 1999 and the creation of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) and the Lisbon Strategy with the objective of building the European Research Area (ERA). The Bologna Process now has 46 member countries and is an influential instrument for promoting reform in higher education across Europe. Whilst the early work concentrated on the structuring of higher education studies into two cycles, Bachelors and Masters, the Berlin Communiqué in 2003 extended the process to include the third cycle of doctoral study. The inclusion of doctoral study in the Bologna process has been linked to the policy objectives of the European Union Lisbon Strategy (2000) with its focus on making Europe a competitive knowledge based economy and society through increasing the number of researchers and enhancing research capacity, innovation and economic growth. However, demographic factors and evidence of decreasing interest amongst young people in research careers, alongside increasing global competition for the best talent, have provided the key drivers for change in doctoral education towards a more flexible profile. The conference of education ministers in Bergen in 2005 led to a statement on doctorate education being issued which included clear reference to applied skills:
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Research overview: effective leader led relations

Research overview: effective leader led relations

Our research indicates the value of re-thinking the nature of (effective) leadership in post- compulsory education. An important conclusion is the need to move away from the rather simplistic and dualistic categories of ‘heroic’ versus ‘post-heroic’ or ‘romanticised’ versus ‘distributed’ leadership (Collinson 2005a). Based particularly on employees’ views of what they consider effective leadership, our findings suggest that a ‘blended leadership’ approach may be particularly effective in the FE sector. Many staff in FE view effective leadership as combining distribution with direction, delegation with decisive decision- making. This kind of leadership approach can respect and enhance the autonomy and discretion of specific communities whilst also reinforcing the wider culture of the whole college. In the colleges we have researched delegation blended with direction appears to be central to effective FE leadership. More research is needed to elaborate this idea and to develop the skills of blended leadership (see also appendix of this paper).
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RESEARCH in cloud computing has led to a variety

RESEARCH in cloud computing has led to a variety

R ESEARCH in cloud computing has led to a variety of mechanisms for the acquisition and use of re- sources, enabling ‘elastic’ and on-demand acquisition and use of such resources. The availability of cloud systems also provides application developers with the potential to change the way these applications interact with computational infrastructure (which, tra- ditionally, has been static and must be known a priori). Applications such as simulations are carried out using specialist software (such as EnergyPlus [3] or Octave [4]) which require significant computational resources and data management capability, and can generally be a time consuming process. The users of these applications are also often interested in car- rying out what-if scenarios by altering simulation parameters to determine various patterns within the solution space. Being able to utilize computational resources at external sites provides one option for reducing execution times of such applications, espe- cially if local resources (i) do not support suitable computational, data storage or hosting capability; (ii)
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led to a resurgence in research on the impact of fiscal policy.

led to a resurgence in research on the impact of fiscal policy.

ABSTRACT: The Keynesian multiplier is a concept embedded in macro- economic thought, policy, textbooks, and widely taught in classrooms. Apparently the only controversy is its empirical size. Is the multiplier a large positive or near zero or perhaps even negative? Most empirical studies have found an impact multiplier that is positive but near zero and a long run multiplier that is larger. From an Austrian perspective, there are several problems with the multiplier concept and the research on it. Coupled with the fact that the concept fails to fully take into account opportunity costs, the multiplier concept has no basis in logic and should not be considered in policy.
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