Prayer and Healing

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PRAYER AND MANTRA AS A PROVENANCE OF HEALING: A SOCIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS

PRAYER AND MANTRA AS A PROVENANCE OF HEALING: A SOCIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS

NOV-DEC, 2015, VOL-3/21 www.srjis.com Page 1125 Conclusion: Sociologically speaking about prayer and mantra as a source of healing would make one come to the conclusion that both these aspects of spiritual healing promotes solidarity and integrity among the people of the society. It promotes a positive outlook to life thereby to upgrade social interaction. Both prayer and mantra are a chained up dimension. Each is interlinked with the other. while doing prayer an individual uses mantras and while doing prayer the mind of the human beings solely concentrates on the mantras and thus they inevitably meditate while praying. Thus, praying is linked with use of mantras and these two leads people to meditate. Various research indicates that prayer, use of mantra and meditation involves a connection in one’s wellbeing. It is one of the most important aspect of the society which is silently followed under the banner of religion, but primarily both the methods can be portrayed as useful mediums for healing people around the world.
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Prayer or spiritual healing as adjuncts to conventional care: a cross sectional analysis of prevalence and characteristics of use among women

Prayer or spiritual healing as adjuncts to conventional care: a cross sectional analysis of prevalence and characteristics of use among women

Results: It is estimated that 26% of Australian women from the 1946 – 1951 cohort (aged 59 – 64 years) use prayer or spiritual healing on a regular basis. Women were significantly more likely to use prayer or spiritual healing if they were non-smokers, non-drinkers or low- risk drinkers, had symptoms of severe tiredness (OR 1.25; 95% CI 1.12 to 1.40), depression, (OR 1.30; 95% CI 1.11 to 1.53), anxiety (OR 1.33; 95% CI 1.15 to 1.53), diagnosed cancer (OR 1.84; 95% CI 1.28 to 2.65) or other major illnesses (OR 1.43; 95% CI 1.18 to 1.75) and used other complementary therapies. Conclusions: A significant proportion of adult women are using prayer or spiritual healing. Given that prayer or spiritual healing was significantly associated with health symptoms, chronic illnesses and positive health seeking behaviours, respect for prayer or spiritual healing practices is required within health care settings. Future research is recommended around specific populations using prayer or spiritual healing, reasons for their use and potential benefits on health related outcomes and general well-being.
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Prayers from the inner city : listening to the prayer board in Southwark cathedral

Prayers from the inner city : listening to the prayer board in Southwark cathedral

Prayers for people known to the prayer author included a wide range of requests for relatives or friends with named or general physical health issues such as cancer, arthritis, diabetes, allergies, HIV, problems resulting from childbirth, ill babies and children, conceiving a child and operations. A number asked for healing in relation to these or for healing more generally. Some of the requests included petitions for affective qualities and gifts such as peace, strength and happiness. There were also some examples of multiple requests by the same prayer author, some of which contained extensive lists of various conditions. A small group of requests were concerned with mental health issues and other non-physical conditions, such as depression, “mental troubles”, Obsessive Compulsive Disorders, stress, drug addiction, and autism. Another group of requests were more general and linked together requests for “health” with other attributes like “wealth” and “happiness”, for example. A few requests were directed to the ill person themselves, including wishes to “Get well soon”.
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Nurturing the Prayer Life of Children

Nurturing the Prayer Life of Children

When I joined the church as a teenager, prayer became a key feature of my Christian faith. As I moved amongst many churches – Presbyterian, Anglican, Catholic, Salvation Army and Pentecostal – the practice of prayer was seen as a rich and diverse resource. My experience linked with scripture; prayer is at the centre, a visible sign of the relationship between God and humans. We can stand in awe of the depth of connection in the prayers of the Psalms or consider the prayer life of Jesus. There were so many aspects of his life and ministry where prayer was a central focus, an expression of his connection with the Father. Examples abound: from the temptation in the wilderness to the prayer in the garden, both his extreme honesty and mysterious power touch us in our need. Jesus’ prayers for healing show compassion. Blessing prayers over food, bread and wine, or the blessing of the children, offer a sense of the goodness of life, an encouragement for us who follow.
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Use of Alternative Therapies for Children With Cancer

Use of Alternative Therapies for Children With Cancer

Methods. Using a prevalence survey design, we inter- viewed 81 parents of children with cancer attending a pediatric hematology/oncology clinic and 80 parents of children attending a continuity care clinic for routine check-ups and acute care. We explored the types of AT being used, the reasons for its use, and the frequency with which it was discussed with the patient’s physician. Results. 1) Overall, 65% of the cancer group were using AT, compared with 51% of the control group. This was not statistically significant. 2) Prayer, exercise, and spiritual healing were three AT practices most often used by the cancer group, and prayer, massage, and spiritual healing by the control group. 3) Discussion of AT with the physician varied according to group, with 53% of the cancer patients discussing its use; income level, with 59% of parents in the higher income group discussing its use; and ethnicity, with 47% of whites discussing its use.
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Index Catalog // Carolina Digital Repository

Index Catalog // Carolina Digital Repository

first to adopt Bakhtin‘s sociolinguistic evaluation of dialogue to contrast and better understand how religious and political ideology became interwoven at each organization, my attention to dialogue soon directed me to something larger and less defined. Adopting Holland and Lave‘s stance that identities are crafted through collective struggles through which positionings of self and other are made meaningful, I fully expected to, and did, witness polarizing positionings of self and other as the two organizations squared off against each other. However, the contrasting gaze offered in the field began to unveil a vaguely-defined other that stood in contrast to the shared self of any person of faith, regardless of affiliation. At both CBN and ARE there lurked in conversational corners a shared perception of a powerful societal force that, for example, dismissed patients‘ belief in the healing power of prayer, became disgusted by public monuments to faith, or felt contaminated by professional contact with people who professed deep spiritual belief. This force was at times barely articulated but deeply felt, and came from so many corners of life that its import became clear only when viewed in light of Christian Smith‘s and Talal Asad‘s critical assessments of secularism as an historical social movement that so transformed Western institutions its own history has been forgotten; instead,
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Psychological type and prayer preferences: a study among Anglican clergy in the United Kingdom

Psychological type and prayer preferences: a study among Anglican clergy in the United Kingdom

A good example of attempts to explore and to assess types of prayer is provided in the classic study reported by Poloma and Pendleton (1989). The annual Akron Area Study in 1985 included 15 questions tapping private prayer activities. That year the survey netted 560 completed interviews, representing a response rate of 89% of all households who started the very long series of questions. On the basis of these data, factor analysis, using oblimin and varimax rotation with principal components, extracted four factors, suggesting that prayer takes four distinct forms. The first form, styled “meditative prayer”, comprised five items (α = .81): spending time just “feeling” or being in the presence of God; spending time just quietly thinking about God; spending time worshipping or adoring God; spending time reflecting on the bible; and asking God to speak and then listening for God‟s answer. The second form, styled “ritualist prayer”, comprised two items (α = .59): reading from a book of prayers; and reciting prayers that you have memorised. The third form, styled “petitionary prayer”, comprised two items (α = .78): asking God for material things you may need; and asking for material things your friends or relatives may need. The fourth form, styled
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Prayer, purpose in life, and attitudes toward substances: a study among 13  to 15 year olds in England and Wales

Prayer, purpose in life, and attitudes toward substances: a study among 13 to 15 year olds in England and Wales

prayer, one strand has been focused specifically on the notion of purpose in life. For example, using a single-item measure of purpose in life, Francis and Burton (1994) found a positive correlation between personal prayer and perceived purpose in life among a sample of 674 12- to 16-year-olds attending a Catholic school and who identified themselves as members of the Catholic Church, even after controlling for individual differences in frequency of church attendance. Francis and Evans (1996) found a significant positive relationship between frequency of personal prayer and perceived purpose in life among two samples of pupils: 669 pupils who attended church most weeks, and 1,640 pupils who never attended church. Francis (2005) replicated and extended the study by Francis and Evans (1996), drawing on two samples of 13- to 15-year olds. The first sample comprised 7,083 males and 5,634 females who never attend church. The second sample comprised 1,738 males and 2,006 females who attend church nearly every week. The data demonstrated a significant positive relationship between frequency of personal prayer and perceived purpose in life among both the churchgoers and the non-churchgoers. Robbins and Francis (2005) extended the study by Francis and Evans (1996) in a different way by drawing a sample of adolescents from
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From the Chalice to the Smart City: Attraction and Repulsion within Sanctified Space in the 21st Century: Projects in the New Urban Centres

From the Chalice to the Smart City: Attraction and Repulsion within Sanctified Space in the 21st Century: Projects in the New Urban Centres

Important focal points, such as hospitals, schools and shopping centres, which attract increasing numbers of persons, even if they are not run by Catholic or religious organisations nevertheless host prayer rooms or places of worship, such as the Umberto I Polyclinic in Rome, and the place of worship opened in the subsidised housing complex of Corviale in Rome, which also serve as shelters and places of prayer open to everybody (Fig. 7), or as places of religious attraction, where people can come together to create stronger centralities, such as at the Divino Amore complex, which features a church for the Roma and Sinti communities (Fig. 8). Today prayer rooms are also being created on means of transport, such as cruise ships, and in leisure facilities, such as beaches (Fig. 9). Or they can be easily set up in any location, such as the portable church designed by the British artist Dave the Chimp, or built in inaccessible locations, such as the Kapelle Nepomuk Oberrealta, built in 1994, at Cazis, designed by the architect Rudolf Fontana (Fig. 10).
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Worship as thanksgiving: the offering of life

Worship as thanksgiving: the offering of life

Prayer is perhaps a good example. Prayer as a specific activity, something we stop or – more likely – pause to do, is certainly a form of prayer. The prayer of thankfulness my mother uttered each morning was, indeed, such a form of prayer. But such a ‘set’ or ‘formed’ ritual, if you will, was part of her general pattern of life. On occasions when I would bemoan my own frustrations over prayer, my mother often said to me, ‘Sandra, I think I pray all the time.’ She certainly didn’t mean that she sat in the corner all day in quiet contemplation. Rather, in her own way, I think she was capturing the sentiment underlying Schmemann’s argument against the dichotomies we often set up.
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Design and Implementation of an Interactive System for Teaching the Islamic Prayer

Design and Implementation of an Interactive System for Teaching the Islamic Prayer

Each of the five daily Islamic prayers consists of a sequence of position that are performed by the user, each one is made up of a different number of units. Figure 2-1 shows each specific movement that is performed in one unit of prayer Piet (2011). The focus for the iIP Software is to ensure that users are performing the prayer positions correctly and in the correct order. The design takes into consideration how users should complete one unit of prayer using the interactive Software.

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'A Miser's Prayer' and John Ward of Hackney

'A Miser's Prayer' and John Ward of Hackney

The writer for Fog’s may have picked up an odd feature of John Ward for his portrait. But the satire leaves out many obvious aspects of his career – apart from his representation of venal boroughs, his exclusion from parliament and his spell in the pillory, there is nothing that hints at his involvement with the South Sea Company, an easy target for critics, or his cronyism with his notorious brother. (Both men were implicated in the forgery charge which brought John down.) Pope took care to recall most of these facts. By contrast, the prayer appears to be composed by a morally lax and acquisitive businessman, rather than an embezzler, a forger and an alleged poisoner of animals – which is how contemporaries would have recognized his lineaments. Acquisitive and crooked Ward certainly was – the South Sea Company eventually won an action against him for attempting to salt away assets that had been declared forfeit by transferring them to his brother and son. But ‘Miser’ was not a term people invoked in his regard.
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Backpacking with a Prayer: Tradition and Modernity

Backpacking with a Prayer: Tradition and Modernity

We examined whether participants on a long trip were more inclined to hold conversations with their trip mates about feeling close to the faith than participants on a short tri[r]

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The prayer economy in a Malian town

The prayer economy in a Malian town

This feature of the prayer economy marks a significant shift in the organization of religious practice, a situation where ties between religious leaders and some, mostly elite followers [r]

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Prayer as God knowledge (via self)

Prayer as God knowledge (via self)

In this paper, I argue that the purpose of prayer is to gain knowledge of oneself. However, this is not the kind of knowledge one can gain merely by in- trospecting—the account of prayer I will focus on here aims to draw a person closer to God through their knowledge of self. To do this, I focus on the short, but intriguing, account of prayer that we find in Kierkegaard’s The Sickness unto Death. Kierkegaard’s pseudonymous author, Anti-Climacus, writes, “to pray is…to breathe, and possibility is for the self what oxygen is for breathing.”⁴ What does Anti-Climacus mean by this remark? In presenting this passage in the wider context of The Sickness unto Death, I argue that prayer as it is presented here is best understood as an activity which enables a person to gain a kind of self-knowledge. More specifically, in seeing what Anti- Climacus writes about the human self as a synthesis of necessity and possibility, we can see prayer as an activity of becoming more aware of our existence as creatures who express both necessity (we are physical, mortal creatures) and possibility (it is possible for us to somehow transcend this earthly life and the constraints of everyday physical existence). After discussing Kierkegaard’s account of prayer and self-knowledge in The Sickness unto Death, I draw a com- parison between Kierkegaard’s Harry Frankfurt’s accounts of the will. ⁵ Drawing on Frankfurt’s notion of wholeheartedness, I describe the Kierkegaardian notion of despair as a kind of internal conflict of the will which is irresolvable without intervention from God; despair cannot be overcome, Anti-Climacus tells us, until the soul “rests transparently in God.”⁶ To explain what generates this internal conflict, I argue that all human beings have a first-order desire for union with
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Black Catholicism and music in Durham, North Carolina : praxis in a new key

Black Catholicism and music in Durham, North Carolina : praxis in a new key

Gilroy has described it. It is a microcosm of the African Diaspora or Black Atlantic. The practical activity that reveals this unique identity is precisely the communal worship activity and experience taking place inside the church, which is best exemplified by the unique prayer of the faithful after Hurricane Katrina. This prayer spontaneously mixed languages (English and Igbo), gestures (postures of prayer), bodily significations (tears), and desires (petitions) through the spoken word and music. My own experiences of hymn, gospel, and spiritual singing at the Church also exemplify Gilroy’s outline of black culture as well as J. Glenn Murray’s: “What does reveal our worship as authentically Black is the interplay of some or all of the following: our indigenous music, dialogic preaching, effective and spontaneous prayer; a spirit of ‘fellowship’; hospitality; suspension of time…” 29 Traditional hymns such as “Taste and See” give rise to fellowship and hospitality for visitors who know the song from their home parishes; its performance style, however, more in the tradition of gospel music, comes across as more “indigenous” to African-American culture, as I explained in the previous chapter. Although they are commonly identified as the cultural property of African- Americans, spirituals such as “Every Time I Feel the Spirit” contain messages that, when sung in church, may speak from and to “the whole people of God,” particularly when they are performed in the position of the Catholic liturgy that most accurately fits the theological and emotional content of their lyrics and musical gestures.
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Hymnography with(out) Music as Scripture and Prayer

Hymnography with(out) Music as Scripture and Prayer

Solo or communal musical performance was always an option for hymns in standard genres, but the most remarkable hymns of “Thekaras” do not, as the monastic authors contained in the collection themselves observe, follow any of the usual prototypes. Indeed, Skaltsis has noted that the volume is far from clear regarding questions of musical performance. “Thekaras” and his co-au- thors sometimes refer to ‘readers’ (‘τοῖς ἀναγνῶσι’) and reading (‘διαβάζετω’), while elsewhere they use ambiguous generic words for ‘saying’ (for example, ‘ εἰπεῖν ’ and ‘ λεγέτω ’) that contrast strongly with explicitly musical terms (in- cluding ‘ὁ ἄδων’ and ‘τοῖς ἄδουσι’). At all events, “Thekaras” and his pupil The- odoulos are firmly of the opinion that a hesychast using a Divine Office con- structed almost entirely of hymns is able to attain the heights of contemplation achieved by those devoted to the monologic Jesus Prayer ‘Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me (a sinner)’. They maintained that a “singer” who internalized these hymns would “feel in his heart the Holy Spirit once Liturgy,” in Experiencing Byzantium: Papers from the 44th Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies, Newcastle and Durham, April 2011, ed. Claire Nesbitt and Mark Jackson, Soci- ety for the Promotion of Byzantine Studies Publications 18 (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2013), 311–58.
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Implicit Religion and the Use of Prayer in Sport

Implicit Religion and the Use of Prayer in Sport

In the current paper, the topic of prayer in sport as a ritual common to both Explicit Christianity and the Implicit Religion of sport is explored. Secondly, the meaning and significance of the Lord‘s Prayer to Christian athletes is examined. Members of multiple Christian denominations regularly recite the ―Lord‘s Prayer,‖ also known as the Oratio Dominica (Prayer of Jesus), and the ―Pater Noster‖ (Our Father) as a part of their worship activity [14]. Christians, agnostics, and non-deists recite the Lord‘s Prayer as a part of pre-game and post-game routines [15-17]. Are athletes aware of what it is that they are praying? Does it impact playing behavior? The point of view of a former college athlete is used to offer insight.
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Effects of an Electronically Guided Prayer Intervention

Effects of an Electronically Guided Prayer Intervention

A sample of 110 undergraduate volunteers recruited from psychology undergraduate courses at Christian colleges across the nation completed the study. Initially, 228 participants signed up for the study. One hundred sixty-four (71.9% of those who volunteered) participants completed the pre-test, and 110 (67% of those who completed the pre-test, 48% of those who volunteered) participants completed the post-test. Each participant downloaded an app created by the researchers to administer a relaxation exercise (n = 36), a prayer exercise (n = 35), or no intervention (n = 39), with participants being randomly assigned to each group. The sample is considered representative of the population of undergraduate Christian colleges with the following distribution: European-American (83.6%), Hispanic or Latino/a (4.5%), African American (2.7%), Asian American (2.7%), Native American (2.7%), and Other (3.6%). The average age of participants was 19.7 years. The gender distribution consisted of 75.5% identifying as female and 24.5% identifying as male.
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The fraction prayer attributed to Severus of Antioch

The fraction prayer attributed to Severus of Antioch

In the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit, One God, to whom is the Glory This blessed book, which is the Euchologion of the three liturgies is inalienable endow- ment and eternal bequest for the church of Lady Mistress in the monastery of Al-Suryān in the holy desert and no one has authority to take it for any reason of loosing and whoever dares and takes it out will not have a share with the Christians and will advocate in front the Lady Mistress in the day of the great judgment. It was endowed by the sinner slave, by name the hegumen Buqțur (Victor) wishing mercy from God. For Christ’s sake do not forget him in your prayer and may not the elevated God forget you from His mercy, in date 1480 of the Martyrs. [= 1746 ᴀᴅ]
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