Private Education

Top PDF Private Education:

Contemporary Private Education in the Au tonomous City of Ceuta: A Study on  Private Religious Centres

Contemporary Private Education in the Au tonomous City of Ceuta: A Study on Private Religious Centres

Private education has also had a relevant role in the social life of Ceuta, a small city with a limited population, constructed in a large part during the first half of the 20th by many military and civil officials, and many other families originating from the south of Spain who arrived in the city in search of a better future than they had in their respective points of origin. These families are those who have laid down roots over the century, giving a boost to the population of the city and the workforce that to a large extent it lacked. The economic resources of civil servants and many of these families meant that their children were able to attend these types of centre, which were not free of charge until the 1970s; thus, some of the centres have been taken in different family gen- erations since their foundation.
Show more

6 Read more

THE HIGHEST DEGREE OF PROTECTION FOR PRIVATE EDUCATION. Prepare. Protect. Prevail. With The Hartford ṢM PRIVATE EDUCATION INDUSTRY INSURANCE

THE HIGHEST DEGREE OF PROTECTION FOR PRIVATE EDUCATION. Prepare. Protect. Prevail. With The Hartford ṢM PRIVATE EDUCATION INDUSTRY INSURANCE

Private education institutions face many of the same pressures as large businesses. The Hartford can help you manage risks and protect your facility with an array of solutions. It’s your job to preserve and strengthen the economic stability of your school, all the while helping it grow and offer more. We’ve created customizable products that offer coverage that’s flexible and inventive – just like your academic community.

8 Read more

Merits or Demerits of the Public Funding of Private Education

Merits or Demerits of the Public Funding of Private Education

In summary, public funding for private education through tuition tax credits or tax payments will not lead to excellence in public education and would be poor educat[r]

9 Read more

The Returns to Private Education: Evidence from Mexico

The Returns to Private Education: Evidence from Mexico

The validity of our findings depends on the validity of the instruments, which in turn relies on the instruments being strongly correlated with the choice of studying at a private or a public high school. In our setting, this means that both the share and the relative size of public high schools in the state and in the year before high school enrolment have to be important determinants of the individual decision to attend a private/public high school. It seems plausible to expect that if the proportion of public high schools and their relative size increase (decrease) at the state level, students are more (less) likely to enrol in a public (private) high school. One may be concerned, however, that individual schooling decisions are driven by the educational supply at a more local level such as the province or the town of residence. This is unlikely to be the case in Mexico, where within-state migration has become more and more common since 1970, especially towards medium-sized cities (CONAPO, 1999). Further, the first- stage estimates will (and do) provide a direct measure of the strong correlation between the instruments and the high school choice.
Show more

18 Read more

Public versus Private Education with Risky Human Capital

Public versus Private Education with Risky Human Capital

We find that especially schooling choice of agents with poorer backgrounds is influenced by the reform, as they can’t easily afford the tuition fees. The reduction in college participation rates is lower for class 1 than for class 2, because children from the lowest socio-economic background already didn’t choose to go to college very often in the initial equilibrium. In ad- dition, we see that the vast increase in returns for tertiary education due to the wage spread even for children with better educated parents does not provide enough incentive to go to college more often. This is due to the accompanying rise in tertiary education investment risk and the fact that students now have to pay for their costs of education themselves. Interestingly, now the welfare of college students is higher than that of agents from lower educational classes, because of the decrease in wages for lower income earners and the tremendous rise in the college wage premium. In terms of welfare of agents with differ- ent socio-economic backgrounds, i.e. before the first schooling choice is made, we find a strong loss of 4.38 to 4.54 percent of initial resources. This is due to several reasons: the decline in tertiary education rates, harder binding liquidity constraints during the phase of tertiary education and the decline in assets which comes with decreasing bequests. With the huge drop in wages for lower educated households and the resulting rise in inequality, the overall welfare loss is higher than in Simulation (2), although bequests decline much less. In the last simulation, in the righter column of Table 7, we now let the initial distribution of agents across different parental backgrounds be endogenous. 9 As one can see, the macroe- conomic effects are pretty much the same as in the exogenous group density case. However, the schooling choice matrix is heavily affected. This is due to the fact that the initial distri- bution of agents now changes in the long-run exactly
Show more

37 Read more

Private education provision and public finance : the Netherlands

Private education provision and public finance : the Netherlands

The question that remains is why we obtain such a large impact of private schools when the raw differential is so small? In other words, the test score outcomes of public and private schools are almost equal. Moreover, choice and competition has existed for almost 100 years. Yet when we control for selection we obtain a positive impact of attending private schools. The answer may lie in the fact that the competition that is created in the market leads to efficiency gains as schools are able to cater to different markets and parents exercise their choice to find the provider for their children that best fits their needs. In fact, the students of private schools come from slightly less well-off families. This is evident in Table 2 which shows that the mothers of private school students are slightly less well educated than the mothers of students in public schools (see also Figure 4). Therefore, one possibility is that the true private school effect operates via the value it adds for students from relatively less well-off backgrounds.
Show more

39 Read more

Private Sector Education in Pakistan. Mapping and Musing

Private Sector Education in Pakistan. Mapping and Musing

At this stage, it is pertinent to point out that the analysis presented in the study draws on the existing statistical data and research studies. Description of the expansion in number of institutions, enrollment and teachers is made by combining data from the Census of Private Educational Institutions 1999-2000, National Education Census 2005 and published data from National Education Management Information System (NEMIS) for 2006-07 and 2007-08. The reader is cautioned that these two sets of databases (censuses and NEMIS reports) are not strictly comparable due to some differences in scope and methodology. For example, the census conducted in 2000 does not cover madrassahs because they were excluded from the definition of private schools but subsequently they were covered in 2005 census. Moreover, the data of private education in NEMIS reports is based on estimates derived from the past trends, contrary to the public sector data which is based on annual census. While these differences do not allow an apple-to-apple comparison, there is no other database on which one could rely for drawing a national-level holistic scenario over a longer period. Despite the differences in their scope and methodology, they provide fairly reliable estimates of growth in institutions, teachers and enrolment. However, the reader has to keep in mind these differences while interpreting the data.
Show more

67 Read more

Self-Entrepreneurship and Education in Private School: An Integrity Perspective

Self-Entrepreneurship and Education in Private School: An Integrity Perspective

The alternative perspective from parents is quite good because they can invest for their children as they wish. Mainly, private schools are the alternative choices of public schools. Private schools were not existed in the past in Nepal. There were government schools only to provide education to the children. They have got monopoly in the market and they provide any sort of education which was unquestionable. But, people have got alternative choices to educate their children at present. Therefore, the alternative theory of development of education and the choice theory of parents will work in our use of theory. Pieterse (2011) adds that many things like local alternatives, cultural alternatives etc. are in use under alternative paradigms. In this time, parents as well as children have choices to select different educational institutions. Khaniya (2007) further supports that the private education is the different taste which is served to the people in Nepal by private owners. So the common citizens can have the choices for their children. They can educate their children in different institutions according to their affordability and choices of the courses. It is their choice that guides the education of the children rather than the planning of the government. Glasser (n.d.) says that choice theory provides many choices that human selects to satisfy human needs. So we can say that private schools are the demand driven choices in Nepalese context
Show more

6 Read more

Intergenerational Mobility under Private vs. Public Education

Intergenerational Mobility under Private vs. Public Education

Our work builds on the modeling of parental and public investments in children’s human capital initiated by Glomm and Ravikumar (1992) and carried forward by Saint-Paul and Verdier (1993), Eckstein and Zilcha (1994), Benabou (1996), and Zhang (1996). An important feature incorporated by Benabou was a source of persistent inequality, in the form of fresh shocks to income in each generation. Without such shocks it is found that (i) inequality disappears in the long-run under public education and under private education as well under a suitable concavity condition, (ii) inequality falls more quickly under public than under private education, and (iii) provided initial inequality is low the long-run growth rate is higher under private than under public education. With fresh shocks to income in each generation, Benabou showed that inequality has a lower steady-state value under public than under private education. Further, public education produces faster rather than slower long-run growth. While the effects of public investment in education on inequality and growth are at the heart in this literature, intergenerational mobility has not been explicitly analyzed in most of the work.
Show more

24 Read more

The contribution and standards processes of private higher education providers

The contribution and standards processes of private higher education providers

Governance and accountability structures are an integral vehicle for the establishment and maintenance of standards within higher education providers. As such, all private HEPs are required to have a formal governance structure overseen by a board made up of internal and independent members. 16 Of particular interest in discussing standards within these providers is the implementation of an Academic Board (or similarly named entity). All except one of the providers involved in the consultations had an established and active Academic Board, comprising of people from within the provider as well as independent members, generally senior or recently retired university academics and representatives from the industries most relevant to the courses provided. The Chair of Board tended to be an academic with relevant expertise, based in a public university. The role of the Academic Board is varied across providers. From the perspective of examining standards processes, however, this board tends to be responsible for approving curriculum (in addition to the external accreditation of curricula), ensuring that grading of assessment is following specified protocols, appointment of key academic positions, and overseeing reports relating to student progress and student satisfaction.
Show more

29 Read more

Exploring Public Private Partnerships in health and education: a critique

Exploring Public Private Partnerships in health and education: a critique

The landscape of partnerships in international development has been changing rapidly over the past decade, with significant realignment of roles between the state, private and third sectors. Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) have emerged as a key form through which healthcare and education are defined, delivered, and, evaluated in developing countries. PPPs are deemed to offer potential for addressing inequalities in provision and access to public services across the Global South, ensuring that resources are targeted equitably and effectively. The articles in this special issue review some of the evidence on PPPs considering whether and in what ways they deliver on addressing intersecting inequalities.
Show more

11 Read more

An Analysis of the Status and Growth of Private Higher Education in India

An Analysis of the Status and Growth of Private Higher Education in India

This paperfocuses on two aspects of private higher education in India: First, it analyses the different types of private higher education institutions in India; Second, it analyses the growth of private higher education institutions in India over the past three decades. Indian higher education system witnessed a remarkable growth in the post-independence era, especially since the 1990s. At present, Indian higher education system is the largest in the world in terms of its number of higher education institutions and the second largest in terms of its enrollment.The major characteristic of this remarkable growth is the unprecedented surge in the numberof private higher education institutions. As per the recent data available,private higher education institutions account for more than 75% of the total number of higher education institutions in India. Increasing demand and resource crunch are considered to be the major factors behind the rapid growth of private higher education institutions throughout the country. Apart from that, the macroeconomic policy changes that
Show more

13 Read more

Student’s View of Education as the Merit and Private Economic Goods

Student’s View of Education as the Merit and Private Economic Goods

This, in particular, can be confirmed by the monitoring research “Russian Institute of Higher Education Through the Eyes of Students” (the project supervisor, Igor Il’inskii; the supervisor of the IV–VI stages, Valeryi Lukov), which is conducted by Moscow University for the Humanities since the year 2000. The purpose of this project is to reveal the important features of a new type of educational institutions for Russia – the nongovernmental institutes of higher education. In the course of the studies it was very important to found out what were the problems of this new subsystem of the Russian higher education, what it manages to obtain, where its unrealized resources are and what the prospects of its development are. Within the framework of the monitoring two groups of institutes of higher education were compared – State and nongovernmental. Both groups consist of the best Moscow institutes of higher education and institutes of more than ten other Russian cities in the closing stages.
Show more

5 Read more

The growth of private and for-profit higher education providers in the UK

The growth of private and for-profit higher education providers in the UK

operating within the Open University’s own charter and statutes, and a more recent entrant to the market – the Open and Distance Learning Quality Council, a private organisation which offers accreditation to domestic and international providers of open and distance learning. The University of Wales also offers validation services to public and private providers nationally and internationally. These arrangements were subject to the Quality Assurance Agency’s institutional review in 2004 and will be reviewed again in 2010. The University of London has offered an extensive external programme of examinations leading to the award of its degrees for the last 150 years. More recently, a new regulatory framework has come into operation in the UK with respect to the Mixed Economy Group of colleges. They have been granted powers to apply to award foundation degrees (under the Further Education and Training Act 2007). These powers do not allow these degrees to be franchised for the first six years, but this will be reviewed after four years. In addition, colleges can only receive public funding for full qualifications, not modules.
Show more

72 Read more

The Curriculum of the Private Architectural Education between Theory and Application

The Curriculum of the Private Architectural Education between Theory and Application

ABSTRACT: architectural education, in general, aims at preparing an architect who can compete regionally and internationally. Responsibility increases for the graduates of universities and institutes of the private architectural education in the national competition with the graduates of the governmental education, consequently that leads to transforming the negative and positive points of the governmental architectural education, in addition to the experiment that needs to concert effort to improve and develop the current track, not only its continuity. But the architecture graduate in Egypt generally suffers from severance between the information that he\she has learned during the study period and what he\she needs to learn in practical life. Also, the society suffers from the great percentage of the graduates from the architectural engineering departments in the public and private faculties of engineering who are not qualified to work efficiently, especially in the field of architectural work. That requires to reach the method of how to make the architectural education in Egypt meet the present and future needs of the society and to respond to them creatively to contribute in regaining the position of the Egyptian architect on the map of the regional and international creativeness. There is no alternative for a real renaissance in Egypt without being concerned with the distinct education and serious scientific research as they are considered the gate through which developed countries.
Show more

14 Read more

Private Higher Education s Quality Assurance in Ghana

Private Higher Education s Quality Assurance in Ghana

part would be conducted by outside organizations. External quality-assurance mechanisms would include accreditation, quality audit, and quality assessment. Whatever the motivation of government, private institutions often recognized the quality-assurance process as an opportunity to establish their legitimacy.

5 Read more

Public education provision, private schooling and income redistribution

Public education provision, private schooling and income redistribution

Upper secondary education Panel (b) of Fig. 4 shows patterns estimated on data on 883 households in the working sample with at least one child in upper secondary schooling age. The results are in stark contrast with what estimated before. In this case, the marginal effects of household equivalent income on expected educational transfers in kind are always pos- itive, implying that household sorting behavior across private and public upper secondary education is connected to different mechanisms compared to compulsory education. If the expected returns to education of the children are positively correlated with the realized returns in income of the household of origin (i.e. the realized returns can be forecast by observed household income), then households may self-select into post-compulsory edu- cation (whether public or private) according to the expected returns. Moreover, for given expected returns, households are more likely to choose a higher level of education if the take-up opportunity costs, including the opportunity costs in terms of foregone wage, are smaller. As Fig. 4 shows, the marginal effects of income at the 10th quantile of the K distri- bution are always statistically positive and larger than the corresponding effects calculated at the 90th quantile, irrespectively of the household income capacity. On the contrary, the effects at the 90th quantile are never significant (Table 7). These findings suggest that house- hold preferences towards the quality of upper secondary education offered by the private sector are not strong enough to induce self-selection behaviors.
Show more

32 Read more

Public private partnerships in education: some policy questions

Public private partnerships in education: some policy questions

Woessmann’s evidence is based only on a sample of 35 countries for which data were available at the level of the school on both who operates the school and who funds the school. Clearly this analysis needs to be broadened to include a much wider range of countries in order to be confident about the generalizability of his findings. Nevertheless, the results are interesting. If Woessmann’s conclusion is generalizable, i.e. if private operation with public funding (type ‘A’ in Figure 1) brings efficiency benefits, then at least three policy questions arise.

5 Read more

Right to education: role of the private sector. March 2012

Right to education: role of the private sector. March 2012

The role of the private sector was recognized even in the 1960s when the Kothari Commission was assigned the task of preparing a road map for school education in the country. Over the years, there has been uneasiness in accepting the role of the private sector. The genesis of this perhaps lies in the ever increasing inequality in the education system, which has shaped the two faces of the country “India” and “Bharat” — one for the elite and the other for the have-nots. This perception is also impacted by civil society’s resistance to globalization. According to the law of the land, education cannot be a means to making profit. This raises the question, then how will programs be sustained. There is a demand for allowing “reasonable returns” on the investment the private sector makes toward education so that its efforts are sustained. On the flip side, if these reasonable returns are allowed, where will it stop? Will there be enough safeguards to ensure that children from economically disadvantaged sections are not denied education because they cannot afford to take admission in schools? Is 25% reservation in private schools the only answer to address issues related to social inequality?
Show more

64 Read more

Quality of Education in Bangladesh: A Survey on Private Business Schools

Quality of Education in Bangladesh: A Survey on Private Business Schools

Without ensuring quality no one can survive in the modern competitive world for long period of time. Thus, quality, its assessment and assurance procedures, have received a great deal of attention in higher education all over the world in recent years. In fact, quality is a composite variable that consists of the dominant factors of customer requirements. The term “quality” is derived from the Latin word “qualitas,” which means the degree of excellence of a thing (Oxford Dictionary, 2003). Murgatroyd and Morgan (1994) offer two different definitions of quality. One is related to quality assurance, and the other is from consumers’ points of view, such as quality assurance refers to the determination of standards, appropriate methods and quality requirements by an expert body, accompanied by a process of inspection or evaluation that examines the extent to which practice meets these standards; and consumer-driven quality refers to a notion of quality in which those who are to receive a product or service make explicit their expectations for this product or service and quality is defined in terms of meeting or exceeding the expectations of customers. In terms of quality in education, the World Bank (1995) puts forth that quality in education is difficult to define and measure. An adequate definition must include student outcomes. Most educators would also include in the definition the nature of the educational experiences that help to produce thus outcomes—the learning environment. Coombs (1985) says that quality of education has many dimensions which is not only customarily defined and judged by student learning achievements, in terms of traditional curriculum and standards rather, Quality also pertains to the relevance of what is taught and learned—to how well it fits the present and future needs of the particular learners in question, given their particular circumstances and prospects. It also refers to significant changes in the educational system itself, in the nature of its inputs; its objectives, curricula and educational technologies; and its socioeconomic, cultural and political environment. In fact, service quality has now become an important dimension for education providers, as with any other business organizations. Hence, customer evaluations of the quality of education should be an integral part of overall quality management in any of the organizations (Haque, 2004). So, present issue regarding private universities in Bangladesh is quality. But, this study will address the quality of private business schools in Bangladesh.
Show more

10 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...