Project Management Professional

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PMP Project Management Professional Exam Study Guide , 7E  Heldman, Kim pdf

PMP Project Management Professional Exam Study Guide , 7E Heldman, Kim pdf

It’s a good idea to include some members of the operational area on the project team when certain deliverables or the end product of the project will be incorporated into their future work processes. They can assist the project team in defining requirements, developing scope, creating estimates, and so on, helping to assure that the project will meet their needs. The process of knowledge transfer to the team is much simpler when they are involved throughout the project; they gain knowledge as they go and the formal handoff is more efficient. This isn’t a bad strategy in helping to gain buy-ins from the end users of the product or service either. Often, business units are resistant to new systems or services, but getting them involved early in the project rather than simply throwing the end product over the fence when it’s completed may help gain their acceptance.
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Project Management Professional Study Guide pdf

Project Management Professional Study Guide pdf

At the completion of the Initiation process, the organization has committed to fund the project and provide the necessary resources to carry it out, or has killed the project. The project has the lowest probability of succeeding during Initiation. That’s because no action has been taken regarding project activities. In other words, you haven’t actually begun to produce the product of the project. Quite a bit of work will have gone into the project at this stage, but most of it regards the overview of the project and the business justification for the project. The stakeholders have greatest ability to influence project outcome at this stage because nothing has been cast in stone yet. There is still time for them to negotiate requirements and deliverables. Risk is highest during Initi- ation because any number of things can happen between now and the time the project is completed. The project might not be approved, the funding might not be approved, the strategic direction of the company could change and the project no longer fits in with the new vision, the customer could change her mind, etc. This list could become quite lengthy.
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Project Management Professional (PMP) Study Guide by Kim Heldman pdf

Project Management Professional (PMP) Study Guide by Kim Heldman pdf

You’ve been appointed project manager for your company’s website design and implementation. You’re working in a projectized organization, so you have the authority to acquire and assign resources. You put together your team including programmers, technical writers, testers, and business ana- lysts. Debbie, a highly qualified graphic arts designer, is also part of your team. Debbie’s specialized graphic arts skills are needed only at certain times throughout the project. When she has completed the graphics design portion of the screen she’s working on, there isn’t anything else for her to do until the next page is ready. Depending on how involved the project is and how the work is structured, days or weeks might pass before Debbie’s skills are needed. This is where the inefficiency occurs in a purely projectized organi- zation. The project manager will have to find other duties that Debbie can per- form during these downtimes. It’s not practical to let her go and then hire her back when she’s needed again.
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The Spread of Project Management into non-Project Management Arenas

The Spread of Project Management into non-Project Management Arenas

continue. This trend will be fueled largely by the benefits that accompany extension of project management to non-project areas. Managing projects in the social media platforms, for example, has shown to improve communication between an organization and people interested in the particular projects. Again, using social media, project managers can efficiently communicate project status, risks and concerns to the stakeholders (Simonds, 2012). In future, the use of social media platforms will provide project managers with tools for engaging project stakeholders. With agile project management emphasizing collaboration between the project team and product stakeholders, social media platforms may increasingly become a useful tool in project management.
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UNEProjectRiskEvaluation

UNEProjectRiskEvaluation

This checklist can be especially valuable if your organization customizes the specific risk characteristics and risk criteria that apply to your institution. For instance, you may find that in your organization, a project of fewer than 200 hours is considered low risk, while one that is 2,000 hours or more is high risk. When you have completed the checklist, look at all of the high-risk items and refer to Section II. In this section, you will see each high-risk factor and examples of problems you may encounter. For each high-risk factor, create a response plan/mitigation plan to ensure that the risk is mitigated. The second column of Section II shows examples of activities that can be added to the risk plan to help mitigate the risk.
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Accessibility and professional capacitation: universitary extension project

Accessibility and professional capacitation: universitary extension project

In Brazil, one of the best ways that the universities have to put the student in a professional ambient with the practice of his future job is the universitary extension projects [1]. Basically, is to practice his knowledge obtained during his graduation, working to the good of the community. These projects seek through social actions to provide benefits in several areas of human knowledge, through the interest of students and teachers, in the deepening of some themes, such as accessibility. It aims at social development, ensuring democratic values of equality of rights, respect for the person and environmental and social sustainability, elaboration and articulation of public policies [2]. The São Paulo State University [3] [4] (UNESP), one of the public and free universities of Brazil, has established its campuses in 24 cities, and has more than 550 universitary extension projects officially registered in its website, and at least 9% of those extensions are about accessibility, inclusion of persons with disabilities, or reduced mobility.
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EXECUTIVES’ PERCEPTION ABOUT PROJECT MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN BEML BANGALORE

EXECUTIVES’ PERCEPTION ABOUT PROJECT MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN BEML BANGALORE

13 (31) 24 (57.1) 3 (7.1) 2 (4.8) 0 (0) 5 List of activities are defined to each individual involved in the project 15 (35.7) 23 (54.8) 1 (2.4) 3 (7.1) 0 (0) 6 Collaborative estimation of cost and time is more effective 12 (28.6) 22 (52.4) 5 (11.9) 3 (7.1) 0 (0) 7 The critical path of the project is defined in detail to ease the complexity in the schedule 15 (35.7) 19 (45.2) 2 (4.8) 5 (11.9) 1 (2.4) [Note: The values in brackets are in percentage]

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Project Management Certification Options within Australia

Project Management Certification Options within Australia

The UK based Office for Government Commerce (OGC) developed a range of methodologies backed by certifications for the management of projects (PRINCE2), programs (MSP) and risk (MoR); plus the P3M3 maturity model; these qualifications are now managed by a joint venture company, AXELOS. The application of PRINCE2 to IT projects, particularly within government agencies had been gaining momentum for several years. The publication of the Gershon Report in 2008 has focused the whole of government on the use of PRINCE2 and the P3M3 maturity assessment tool – this is an expanding area of work and requires people certified in the methodologies.
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McGraw Hill   Quality Management Demystified pdf

McGraw Hill Quality Management Demystified pdf

• Other audit or assessment activities. Sometimes, another audit department or agency is already overseeing or evaluating a function. In that case, the audit services department may assist, but will not duplicate the work. The result of this series of interviews is a risk footprint for the organization, which prioritizes the likelihood of valuable results of audit work in different areas of the company. Evaluating risk is parallel to looking for error—we don’t know if anything is wrong until we check. But the risk footprint is the best assessment of which rocks are worth lifting up and peering under. The managers of the audit department then assign resources, planning audits of the highest-risk areas, and looking for ways to do surveys or reviews of as many other areas as possible. One technique that is becoming more popular is to have directors and managers certify that all work—or particularly risky types of work—are being properly managed. For example, if an audit services department doesn’t have enough staff to audit every IT development project, then auditors would be assigned to large projects and those known to be in trouble, and senior manage- ment would be required to certify that other projects are under control and likely to succeed. Before a manager signs his name to something like that, he’s going to take a look.
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Handout en INTRO 20130913 pdf

Handout en INTRO 20130913 pdf

The exam questions have been written according to the PMP Examination Content Outline, which in turn has been derived from the role delineation study, a regularly updated survey about the expectations project managers have to meet. The PMBOK® Guide and other books are then used to verify that the exam questions and default answers comply with the actual standard of knowledge and branch discussions.

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PP: Trends In Modern Project Management - Past Present & Future

PP: Trends In Modern Project Management - Past Present & Future

The direct consequence of the issues discussed above is the continuing high levels of project failures identified by KPMG, Standish, Gartner and others. Unfortunately, Cobb's Paradox still holds true: "We know why projects fail; we know how to prevent their failure -- so why do they still fail?" xiii The challenge facing the profession of project management is to eliminate this paradox and dramatically improve the success rate of projects. Whilst the ‘tactical battle’ at the coal face of project management is being won, and the governors and owners of organisations are being forced to address ‘project governance’ by regulatory and legislative imposts such as the Sarbanes Oxley Act; the main ‘war’ has only just started. The effort needed to change the attitudes of ‘middle and senior management’ and the culture of organisations will be much harder and take far longer but without this change project management will never deliver its full potential.
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EFFECT OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT ON PROJECT SUCCESS

EFFECT OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT ON PROJECT SUCCESS

The research was carried out to examine how the various hypotheses tested in this research work affect the success of Blackstone construction Nigeria limited, which was selected as the case study of the research topic, from the findings the study revealed that the production process of the organization needs proper control. The companies recognize the possibility to succeed among the construction firms in Nigeria, therefore the company must make a commitment on the continuous improvement in developing innovative products idea and services that are once combine exceptional quality. This line of could lead to the innovations strategy of producing structure, or fancy blocks that satisfies the need and culture of the companies immediate environment, with that acceptance of the quality level of the project actualized by the company the patronage of the customer will definitely increased, this will definitely enhance a better market share for the organization, that will tends to increase the profitability and ensure sustainability of the organization in the country.
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TRACES OF DIGITAL TRUST: AN INTERACTIVE DESIGN PERSPECTIVE

TRACES OF DIGITAL TRUST: AN INTERACTIVE DESIGN PERSPECTIVE

the basis of reputation, for instance. Thus, Abdul-Rahmann and Hailes (2000) describe how agents in a virtual community can judge another’s opinion via reputation and fine-tune their trust reading. Gonçalves et al.’s (2009) work explores how trading reputation information can help users to decide whether to share information and other resources in a digital environment. The nuances of reputation as a means to judge trust, for instance, problems of dishonest manipulation of information, are discussed by Gal-Oz et al. (2010). Moreover, detail about how to provide users with a sense of security and reliability in environments where security is a major issue is the focus of Murayama et al.’s research (2010). The problem here, as indicated in the five studies outlined above, is that reputation is considerably more important in some contexts than in others, and is constituted in different ways (e.g. narratively). Put simply, reputation is a loaded word. In organisational contexts, for instance, it is entirely possible that a ‘good’ reputation for one person (e.g. someone working in a managerial capacity) may be another’s ‘bad’ reputation (‘toady’; ‘yes man’). A similar argument can be applied to any of the standard terms applied in the trust literature. The point I am trying to establish is that terms like trust, familiarity, reputation, risk, continuity, security, privacy and so on are meaningless outside of the context of their application. The path explored here is that of identifying the dimensions along which trust decisions typically are made within specific contexts and how to produce a generic trust-enabling framework that allows us to consider these variations. For instance, in chapter 7, the film professionals’ project, participants drew attention to similar areas of a document as places where information might be ‘trustable’ or not. While they agreed on the relevance of certain texts, they did not necessarily agree on their significance as they applied different value systems when assessing them. This is the motivating force for developing shared contexts that give participants the tools they need to draw conclusions on their own terms. How then might these tools be constituted?
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Learning mobility in professional practice: transforming workplace learning in higher education

Learning mobility in professional practice: transforming workplace learning in higher education

The core conditions that transcend the characteristics of designing for professional learning that makes provision for learning mobility are the educator’s motivation and engagement (Biggs & Tang, 2007; A. Martin, 2006). Motivation and engagement provide educators as adult learners with the energy and drive to work effectively, learn, and achieve to their potential (A. Martin, 2006). However, educators must feel confident and in control to assume personal responsibility (R. Martin, McGill, & Sudweeks, 2013). A re-distribution of the function of academic work across the mobility of networks, communities, and conversations shifts the responsibility on to the educator to personalise their own scholarly practice and professional learning trajectory (Jewitt, 2009). This suggests that the educator’s learning mobility, like authentic professional learning, is the responsibility of the educator. Taking responsibility for one’s own learning mobility, King (2003) suggests, requires educators to develop skills and experience in self-directed learning. Cultivating self-directed learning is situated in, and influenced by, what educators experience and how it is experienced. Boud and Walker (1991) refer to this as the learners’ personal foundation of experience, a way of being present in the world, which profoundly influences what they bring to the professional learning situation. This, in turn, influences what and how they learn based on their
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Project Management Effectiveness: the choice - formal or informal controls

Project Management Effectiveness: the choice - formal or informal controls

Proposition 5 predicted that external IS projects have more extensive formal controls than internal IS projects. Table 5 and Figure 2a show that the overall trend of using formal controls decreased over the project duration. The more external and purely external IS projects showed that formal controls had been used extensively during project initiation, development and implementation. One important note is that the use of formal controls in the development stage of semi-more external projects caused problems. While most of the interview data supports this proposition, there was one exception from the iteration results. The more-external project type (project #4) showed that although there were strong formal controls at the beginning of the project, it suffered from inadequate infrastructure that would normally have detected the problems in the early stages. Although the project manager stated that they adopted formal control mechanisms such as a project schedule, formal meetings, and written documentation, those mechanisms lacked the monitoring required from the project personnel, i.e., project staff lacked the management skills necessary to ensure the success of the formal controls. Thus, there is moderate support for proposition 5.
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Construction Project Scheduling of MK Apartment using MS Project 2013

Construction Project Scheduling of MK Apartment using MS Project 2013

manpower. For the present study, author considered a multi storey building construction named “MahadevParisar at ShivajiNagar Bhopal”. The project attributes consists of G+6 floors residential apartments with 92 flats in it. With an available land area of 2.64 acres at shivajinagar Bhopal with he estimated duration of completion of 24 months, but the project was delayed. In this paper author suggests that delay was due to the improper planning, scheduling, execution and controlling of the project, this may lead to the increased over head cost of the project and increased duration of completion of the project, and also poor quality in construction . In this project MSP2013 is used as the project management tool, and two phase methodology is adapted in this project scheduling process. in the first phase the information available from the site and all the drawings available are collected, the quantities of materials going into the project are estimated and tabulated .For the second phase various activities involved in the construction of apartment are listed in the MSP 2013, these activities are broken down using WBS application in MSP into sub tasks. The activity start and finish dates are defined manually or using auto schedule option, various resources available for the construction of the project are allocated and the critical path of the project is given by MSP2013,the baseline of the project was set and the activities are tracked for completion the incomplete activities were rescheduled as a result the estimated time of completion was exceeded from 693 days to 1424 days, the cost of manpower was exceeded from 2.5 crores to 3.1 crores . The variance cost of 67 lakhs and the variance time of 731 days were found as a result of application of scheduling . [1]
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Critical Success Factors in ERP Implementation : A Review

Critical Success Factors in ERP Implementation : A Review

This section of the paper describes how the authors collected data for their research and based on what they did all. In this study Leopoldo Colmenares (2004) determined to ask the observations and familiarities of companies using ERP systems in Venezuela and used this information as basis of Data collection. The key informant method used for accumulating the information was on a social setting by surveying (or interviewing) a selected number of participants. Also questionnaires were designed for the project managers information.

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Project Management Maturity in Local Government

Project Management Maturity in Local Government

All businesses, either explicitly or implicitly, manage a portfolio of products or services delivery to their customers (Project Management Institute 2010). Disciplined project management starts at this portfolio level, where the strategic vision drives initial invest- ments and where value measures are established (e.g. profit). More sophisticated busi- ness take an aligned approach to strategic project, program and portfolio management across the organisation (Project Management Institute 2010) also known as Organisa- tional Project Management (Project Management Institute 2003). The development of a Project Management framework is the acknowledgment of project management as a discrete discipline that should be separated from specialist roles such as design or con- struction. As projects are the means by which business introduces change, and that project work entails a higher degree of risk than other business activity, it follows that implementing a secure, consistent, well-proven approach to project management is a valu- able business investment (Office of Government and Commerce 2009). This section will describe in–brief the dominant models available for adoption within Local Government and against what important elements Project Management maturity might be assessed.
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PP: A Simple View of ‘Complexity’ in Project Management

PP: A Simple View of ‘Complexity’ in Project Management

engineer’s’ algorithm. In these circumstances, good managers can minimise identifiable risks through effective risk management and lead, motivate and provide direction assisted by their project plans but the only person that can actually ‘control’ the work is the knowledge worker. The knowledge worker also needs to be continually adjusting his work to remain coordinated with the work of other knowledge workers in the team – the goals of his work are changing as the work of the project unfolds. In these circumstances, the manager is just one of many people relating and communicating in the complex network of interactions needed to successfully deliver the project 8 .
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Project management for a developing profession

Project management for a developing profession

Dinham and Stritter (1986) differentiate professional education from trades or craft by its ‘reliance on theory’ (p. 952), and differentiate higher educational curricula by the inclusion of educational experiences and professional initiation through an apprenticeship. One of the distinctions of a profession is the requirement to ‘set aside personal beliefs and preferences in favour of the client’s best interests’ (p. 953). They describe professional education in terms of ‘transforming the student’s gestalt from confusion to familiarity, so the student comes to inhabit the professional world’ and conclude that there is no magical formula to predict a learner’s academic nor professional performance, that preparation must include more than merely cognitive knowledge, and that successful education requires both the ‘art’ of teaching and the ‘science’ of teaching’. They raise the following questions about determining the effectiveness of professional education (p. 964):
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