Provision of Child Welfare Services

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CHILD WELFARE SERVICES

CHILD WELFARE SERVICES

(t) (1) "Teaching and demonstrating homemaker" means a person who provides homemaking instruction, through discussion and example, to parent(s)/guardian(s), or other adult(s) fulfilling the parental role, and/or families when parent/guardian functioning can be improved by teaching more effective child care skills and home maintenance. Although this instruction does not include the routine provision of regular homemaker services, teaching and demonstrating homemakers may provide direct child care and home maintenance services incidental to the primary goal of improving parent functioning through demonstrating and teaching the skills required to successfully manage and maintain the home and meet the needs of children in that setting. This instruction is available on a 24-hour basis as resources permit. It does not necessarily have to be provided during the presence of the parent(s)/guardian(s) in the home.
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Infants and the decision to provide ongoing child welfare services

Infants and the decision to provide ongoing child welfare services

The emergence of child sex as a significant predictor of service provision was an unexpected finding in this study. The incidence rates for maltreatment-related investiga- tions involving infants are fairly similar for female and male infants in Ontario (58.88 vs 57.61 per 1000 chil- dren, respectively); yet, there was a larger proportion of female infants transferred to ongoing services when com- pared to male infants (45.9 vs 34.1%) at the conclusion of the maltreatment-related investigations. The Canadian research on child sex and service provision decisions is mixed. This study’s findings corroborate Jud, Fallon and Trocmé’s study indicating that child’s gender was sig- nificantly associated with the decision to provide ongo- ing services or a referral for specialized services for the family; more specifically, male children received fewer services than female children [33]. In contrast, Fast and colleagues did not find an association between child gen- der and the provision of ongoing service for adolescents in a Canadian sample [1]. Canadian studies that have examined the association between gender and place- ment [46] or the substantiation decision [47] in infant maltreatment investigations have not found a significant relationship at the bivariate level with an infant’s gen- der. Are the families of female infants perceived to be at greater risk and need of ongoing child welfare services than male infants? Understanding how gender influ- ences the child welfare system’s response to infants and younger children is an important endeavor in light of the research that suggests that there are gender differences in the onset of early childhood mental health problems [48, 49]. There is also emerging evidence that the impact of early childhood maltreatment on behavioural problems seems to be modified by gender [50]. Further research is indicated with respect to the influence of child sex in maltreatment-related investigations and service provi- sion decision-making involving infants.
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CHILD WELFARE SERVICES PROGRAM Handbook REQUIREMENTS Handbook PROBATE CODE

CHILD WELFARE SERVICES PROGRAM Handbook REQUIREMENTS Handbook PROBATE CODE

The court shall also make a determination on the record as to whether reasonable efforts were made to prevent or eliminate the need for removal of the minor from his or her home and whether there are available services which would prevent the need for further detention. Services to be considered for purposes of making this determination are case management, counseling, emergency shelter care, emergency in-home caretakers, out-of-home respite care, teaching and demonstrating homemakers, parenting training, transportation, and any other child welfare services authorized by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 16500) of Part 4 of Division 9. The court shall also review whether the social worker has considered whether a referral to public assistance services pursuant to Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11200) of Part 3, Chapter 7 (commencing with Section 14000) of Part 3, Chapter 1 (commencing with Section 17000) of Part 5, and Chapter 10 (commencing with Section 18900) of Part 6, of Division 9 would have eliminated the need to take temporary custody of the minor or would prevent the need for further detention. If the minor can be returned to the custody of his or her parent or guardian through the provision of those services, the court shall place the minor with his or her parent or guardian and order that the services shall be provided. If the minor cannot be returned to the custody of his or her parent or guardian, the court shall determine if there is a relative who is able and willing to care for the child. Where the first contact with the family has occurred during an emergency situation in which the child could not safely remain at home, even with reasonable services being provided, the court shall make a finding that the lack of preplacement preventive efforts were reasonable. Whenever a court orders a minor detained, the court shall state the facts on which the decision is based, shall specify why the initial removal was necessary, and shall order services to be provided as soon as possible to reunify the minor and his or her family if appropriate.
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Services used by perinatal substance-users with child welfare involvement: a descriptive study

Services used by perinatal substance-users with child welfare involvement: a descriptive study

The provision of comprehensive services is widely con- sidered to improve treatment outcomes for pregnant and parenting substance-using women [16-18]. Women often can only engage in treatment when attention is given to pragmatic concerns, such as child care and transportation [19-22]. A review of 38 studies of sub- stance abuse treatment for women found that more positive treatment outcomes were associated with the availiability of child care, prenatal care, mental health services, a focus on women ’ s issues, women-only admis- sions and comprehensive treatment [19,23,24]. In another review, effective programs provided parent training and family interventions, visited in the home during the pregnancy to help prepare women for par- enting responsibilities, and fostered collaboration among multiple agencies [25]. A policy review on early detec- tion of prenatal substance exposure concluded that child developmental outcomes could be improved when child welfare systems collaborate with treatment providers and promote therapeutic as opposed to punitive actions [26].
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JOHANNESBURG CHILD WELFARE SOCIETY

JOHANNESBURG CHILD WELFARE SOCIETY

planning was made a required part of the children’s court process (s176). Provision was made to promote adoption, with the minimum of delay, in clear cases of abandonment of very young children [s176(3)]. The court was given the authority to confer increased parental responsibilities and rights on foster parents or kinship caregivers where a child had been orphaned or abandoned, or where family reunification was not in the child’s interests. In such cases, provision was made for orders of more than the usual maximum of two years to be issued (s205) and for social work services to be dispensed with in cases of court-ordered kinship care, and also, after at least two years of monitoring, in foster care (s203). A foster or kinship care placement was not to be terminated without having regard to the bond between the child and the caregiver, and to a range of possibilities for permanence, including permanent foster care or adoption by the caregiver (s206). The grounds for dispensing with a biological parent’s consent to adoption were expanded (s261, s266). The court was given authority to terminate, suspend or restrict any or all parental rights and responsibilities of a parent or caregiver of a child in alternative care, once such a child had remained in care for a defined period, the length of which would depend on the age of the child – varying from six months in the case of an infant to two years for a child over seven (s141). A means-tested adoption grant was provided for, so as to enable long-term caregivers
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Exploring inequities in child welfare and child protection services: Explaining the 'inverse intervention law'

Exploring inequities in child welfare and child protection services: Explaining the 'inverse intervention law'

Thus variations in rates should not be seen as reflecting either need or bias but rather a combination of the two elements. Both the perception that children are at risk and the capacity for services to intervene are necessary for children to be placed on child protection plans or in out-of-home care. The inverse intervention relationship may be explained in terms of these two broad factors operating in conjunction with one another, although this model requires empirical confirmation. In both affluent and disadvantaged LAs, children in more deprived neighbourhoods will show higher levels of need. Deprivation always impacts on childhoods. But in more affluent LAs, it may be primarily the greater level of service provision that results in higher rates of intervention than in disadvantaged LAs at any given level of neighbourhood deprivation. Ethnicity appears to operate as a modifying factor, though whether this is because of demand or supply factors is less clear, from the data available.
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Valuing changes in welfare to individuals and society resulting from the government's provision of children's social services in England: final report

Valuing changes in welfare to individuals and society resulting from the government's provision of children's social services in England: final report

Volume indicators can be obtained by measuring CSS activities. This method is advocated by Parker et al (1991) and Yates (1996). Friedman, Garnett and Pinnock (2005) argue that long term outcomes may be predicted by measuring interim outcomes or even processes as surrogates for long term outcomes. In addition, they point out that process data show whether things that are expected to contribute to better outcomes are actually happening. The way forward, then, for measuring CSS output is enunciated in Principle F: Ideally the impact of Children’s Social Services’ interventions on outcomes should be isolated using individual child-level data. As this is unavailable, a simpler approach must be taken using aggregate volume measures adjusted by aggregate quality, but without controlling for external factors such the impact of other agencies. Although second best, this approach improves on the current measure which combines a smaller number of unadjusted volume measures with indicators of input.
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The National Child Welfare Workforce Institute

The National Child Welfare Workforce Institute

Concurrent to the development of the Leadership Competency Framework, the NCWWI also developed a conceptual model of leadership shown on page 4. To illustrate the dimensions of the leader’s world and the constant balancing act involved, the model built on a Competing Values Approach as described by Mark Preston (2005) in a comprehensive review of literature on child welfare management education and training. Using this framework, the leader’s world can be broken down into four quadrants: internal flexibility, external flexibility, internal control, and external control. Within each, there is a specific focus.
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"Welfare Impact of a Ban on Child Labor"

"Welfare Impact of a Ban on Child Labor"

factors that are a¤ected by this parameter. On the one hand, a high implies a large amount of labor supplied by children; when = 0:6; 40% of children’s time is allocated to work while 12% is allocated to education. This means that a ban on child labor has a bigger impact on children’s labor supply and income. On the other hand, agents do not care as much about leisure, so the release of time from child labor has little direct impact on utility, while its impact on human capital accumulation is limited by the low coe¢ cient of time and the diminishing returns in the education process. Therefore, the opportunity cost of children’s labor is diminished by the decreased weight of leisure in the utility function and the low impact of time on the human capital accumulation process, while the negative impact of the ban increases with the amount of labor supplied by children. The response of parental transfers is still signi…cant and o¤sets the net negative impact of the ban on child labor on children’s well-being. But the reduced increase in children’s utility, due to the lower cost of opportunity of child labor, is not enough to induce an increase in the initial average level of welfare.
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Quebec s Child Welfare System

Quebec s Child Welfare System

determine if the child’s security or development is compromised (concerns reported are substantiated). At the conclusion of the investigation, the security or development of the child is either deemed as compromised or not compromised (i.e. the maltreatment investigation is either substantiated or not substantiated).

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SERVICES PERIOD COVENANT REGARDING PROVISION OF SERVICES

SERVICES PERIOD COVENANT REGARDING PROVISION OF SERVICES

Material changes in service, as mutually agreed, may result in a realignment of resources and service delivery capabilities. The Environmental and Technology Profile will provide an abstract of the current technology environment that establishes the baseline for the technology services specified below. If the Solano Community College District’s changing or expanding needs require technology services or staffing beyond the Services or staffing reasonably anticipated in this Statement of Work or materially changes the Environmental and Technology Profile SunGard Higher Education is required to support, then such additional services or staffing shall be considered Additional Services and SunGard Higher Education and the Solano Community College District will meet and negotiate in good faith to amend this Statement of Work to accommodate the required changes, or increase the fees to permit SunGard Higher Education to add additional resources to accommodate the required changes. Any such amendment will not reduce the fees. Savings resulting from reduced responsibilities in one area will be redeployed to new or expanding needs in other areas with the consultation and approval of the Solano Community College District. It shall be evidence of a potential need for additional funding if there is a material change in the Environmental and Technology Profile which is made a part of the Statement of Work.
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Parent-Child Interaction Therapy and Resilience Within Child Welfare

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy and Resilience Within Child Welfare

I certainly never expected that this section of my dissertation would be the most difficult to write. However, it is extremely difficult to put into words how the support I have received, beginning as early as 2012, has helped to guide me along this path. Dr. James ‘Dimitri’ Topitzes has exemplified all that I have aimed to be- a researcher with a practitioner’s heart whose work both produces knowledge and has implications for the real world. Dimitri, your dedication to providing feedback and guidance that is helpful, filled with humanity, and allows me to pursue options that I feel are in my best interest will leave a lasting impression on me. I sincerely hope that we continue to collaborate. Dr. Michael Brondino has provided me with the necessary skills, and resources, to advance my dissertation and to pursue a wide variety of employment opportunities. His willingness to work through any problem (even when you just show up at his office) has been invaluable. Dr. Joshua Mersky has continually reminded me to engage in the process and not just focus on the end product. I have always been able to count on his willingness to reach out to other scholars on my behalf, and I hope to be able to return the favor someday. Dr. Cheryl McNeil trained me in PCIT in 2014 and thanks to her superior clinical skills and dedication to research, I have learned to ground my research with practice and vice versa. I fondly think of Cheryl as the Yoda of PCIT. Dr. Nancy Rolock has pushed my thinking, and my work has always benefitted from it. I look forward to collaborating with her on child welfare research. Dr. Erin Winkler has been an incredible teacher, mentor and advocate. Her insights into qualitative research, coupled with her personable demeanor, always makes me feel comfortable sharing my work with her because I know she will give practical feedback and be an ally in a world dominated by prediction and control.
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MEDIA TOOLKIT. for Child Welfare Leaders

MEDIA TOOLKIT. for Child Welfare Leaders

CITY, STATE — [Provide a summary of the key information about your story, event, etc. This should be brief and answer who, what, when, where, and why. Some examples of key information could include details of your organization’s National Adoption Month kickoff event, the public release of the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System (ACFARS) data, if your State receives an Adoption Incentive payment, a foster care alumni’s personal story about how he or she benefited from local community assistance, when AdoptUSKids features a child or sibling group from your area waiting to be adopted or selects someone from your agency as the Caseworker of the Month, or an upcoming prospective adoptive parent meeting or wait- ing child match-up event.]
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AFRICAN CHARTER ON THE RIGHTS AND WELFARE OF THE CHILD

AFRICAN CHARTER ON THE RIGHTS AND WELFARE OF THE CHILD

1. States Parties to the present Charter shall take all appropriate measures to ensure that a child who is seeking refugee status or who is considered a refugee in accordance with applicable international or domestic law shall, whether unaccompanied or accompanied by parents, legal guardians or close relatives, receive appropriate protection and humanitarian assistance in the enjoyment of the rights set out in this Charter and other international human rights and humanitarian instruments to which the States are Parties.

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The African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child

The African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child

2015. The complaint traversed a range of socio-economic rights violations impacting the position of talibés, aged between 4 and 12 years, who are sent away by their parents to live in Quranic schools known as daaras in the urban centres of the Republic of Senegal, allegedly to receive religious education. The respondent state was alleged to have failed to bring perpetrators to book or deal decisively with the phenomenon of the talibés, causing numerous Charter violations, including related to the provisions of art 4 (best interests of the child), art 5 (the right to survival and development), art 11 (the right to education), art 12 (the right to leisure, recreation and cultural activities), art 14 (the right to health and health services), art 15 (prohibition of child labour), art 16 (protection against child abuse and torture), art 21 (protection against harmful social and cultural practices), and art 29 (prohibition of sale, trafficking and abduction of children). The Committee concluded that, despite the measures the respondent adduced it had undertaken to prevent and address the problem, it had failed to discharge its Charter obligations sufficiently and was therefore in breach of the Charter. 62
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Punishing welfare : genealogies of child abuse

Punishing welfare : genealogies of child abuse

replaced the charity worker and probation officer as the bearer of a special knowledge of the problem child. A psychiatrist, recruited from the adult prison system, was placed in charge of a new Children’s Court Clinic advising the court about the ‘conduct and habits’ of a child coming before the court for being a neglected child, or on criminal charges. In Victoria, the Clinic employed psychologists, social workers and a nurse; it was headed by a psychiatrist, and worked closely with probation officers and other officials. Any case or incident could be referred to the Clinic for investigation — the psychiatrist would examine the child and interview the parents; the psychologist would most likely test the child with one of the new intelligence tests; while the social worker would visit the home and report back on the child’s parents and living conditions. The psychiatrist would prepare a report on all this and submit a recommendation for disposal of the case to the court. Often what was at stake was whether the child would be returned home, or sent to an institution or into foster care — or, in the case of a child charged with a criminal offence, whether the child was put on probation, or was committed to a reformatory if the charge was proven. These procedures applied to both neglected and offending children and were prosecuted in the same court. Like that of the charity worker, the doctor’s role was an extension of the judicial apparatus, providing opinion to the court on how the child was best dealt with. But there is also good evidence drawn from court records in the 1940s showing that the doctor acted as an adjunct to the prosecution, interviewing the child, cross-examining material brought by the social worker and making decisions on the ‘character’ of the child. It can be argued that he served less as a ‘man of science’ than as an adviser on aspects of the character and culpability of the child. 21
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The Provision of Services for Children with Autism

The Provision of Services for Children with Autism

This NGO offers training and services aimed at people who want to help those involved with working with people with autism. They deliver training in-house and offer services to schools and universities. In addition, they offer consultancy services similar to the National Autistic Society.

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FRAMEWORK FOR SOCIAL WELFARE SERVICES

FRAMEWORK FOR SOCIAL WELFARE SERVICES

A developmental approach is an integral factor in the delivery of integrated social welfare services. South Africa’s developmental approach to social welfare evolved from the country’s unique history of inequality, human rights violations due to colonialism and apartheid, and a long history of human agency and social action to change these conditions. Consequently, new social welfare thinking was infused with notions of social transformation, human emancipation, reconciliation and healing, and the reconstruction and development of society. These ideas are enshrined in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa Act, 1996 and the subsequent adoption of relevant policies and legislation to reflect the vision and values of the new society. This approach is based largely on the White Paper for Reconstruction and Development (1994), which has as one of its goals, socio- economic development through poverty alleviation. Developmental social welfare services will use community development as a mechanism for poverty alleviation in the country.
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Marvin Ventrell. Legal and Judicial Engagement. Child welfare law and the child welfare court systems are the outgrowths of centuries of

Marvin Ventrell. Legal and Judicial Engagement. Child welfare law and the child welfare court systems are the outgrowths of centuries of

information from the child and explain his or her perspective. They can use their abilities and experience to help the lawyer communicate with the child and understand what course of action is in the child’s best interests (American Bar Association date). The social worker can communicate the specific story of an individual or family in a legal system that may seem cold, impersonal, and unconcerned with the circumstances of each case. This will improve the quality of legal advocacy, even if it does not bring the goals and perspectives of the attorney and the social worker into harmony.
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Not-for-profit Provision of Public Services

Not-for-profit Provision of Public Services

Existing theories suggest that nonproÞt Þrms should arise in sectors where it is difficult for the purchaser to contract with the provider of the good or service sold. 1 NonproÞts are, indeed, usually found in the provision of services, where this type of contract is difficult to specify. But most service sectors are exclusively provided by for-proÞt Þrms, whose concern for their reputations ensures delivery of quality service. Existing theories of nonproÞts based on contracting purchase difficulties can not satisfactorily explain why reputations do not similarly work for for- proÞt Þrms in sectors where nonproÞt Þrms are widespread.
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