regulatory impact

Top PDF regulatory impact:

Regulatory impact analysis roles for agricultural products` qualities: Customers` perspectives for sustainability entrepreneurship

Regulatory impact analysis roles for agricultural products` qualities: Customers` perspectives for sustainability entrepreneurship

Presently, the impact of policy regulatory bodies in ensuring agricultural product qualities and sustaining agricultural smallholders are globally gaining ground even among European continents. Thus, a recent European study has found that such bodies play crucial roles in providing information and implementing laws that would trigger stakeholders, sciences, and citizens to quickly adapt to better strategies towards improving agricultural products’ qualities. An example of such effective policy was seen from improvising agricultural water production quality through effective long-terms communication streams (Glavan et al., 2019). Similarly, a study conducted in Italy by Capone et al. (2016), which focused on developing methodological approaches for assessing agricultural products’ qualities for better environments, economics, social, cultural, nutritional and Mediterranean Apulian agro-products consumers’ sustainable health, demonstrated that implementing a viability logo could bring about effective promotion for rural agricultural productions and qualities. However, Pölling et al. (2017) proposed that policy assessments for improving agro-products’ qualities and sustainable agricultural entrepreneurship could be influenced by the farmers’ contextual regions. Consequently, the scholars’ comparative studies in Spain, Italy, and Germany showed that integrating agricultural diversifications was the most business model that propelled agro-products’ sustainability in these selected regions. Congruently, Yu (2017) claimed that economic rationale adopted by various regions determined the regulatory impact on agricultural products and economical growths. Therefore, the scholar illustrated that considering various external, internal, and autonomous factors while initiating regulatory impact analysis is capable of generating optimal income towards sustaining healthier business and economic modeling.
Show more

15 Read more

Regulatory impact assessment

Regulatory impact assessment

RIA (or simply Impact Assessment, IA) is a systematic and mandatory appraisal of how proposed primary and-or secondary legislation will affect certain categories of stakeholders, economic sectors, and the environment. “Systematic” means coherent and not episodic or random. “Mandatory” means that it is not a voluntary activity. Essentially, RIA is a type of administrative procedure, often used in the pre-legislative scrutiny of legislation. Its sophistication and analytic breadth vary, depending on the issues at stake and the resources available - the degree of sophistication should be proportional to the salience and expected effects of the regulation. Indeed, the expected effects analyzed via RIA may cover administrative burdens or basic compliance costs, or more complex types of costs and benefits, including environmental benefits, distributional effects, and the impact on trade. The scope of economic activities covered by RIA ranges from some types of firms to whole economic sectors, competitiveness and the overall economic impact of regulations. RIA can also be used to appraise the effects of proposed regulations on public administration (e.g., other departments, schools, hospitals, prisons, universities) and sub-national governments. Although
Show more

30 Read more

Cost Analysis of the Regulatory Impact Assessment Process

Cost Analysis of the Regulatory Impact Assessment Process

4 regulation of a particular area and for achieving the objectives of the draft law in consultation with the stakeholders (legal entities, trade unions, chambers of commerce, associations and foundations, and all other natural and legal persons). 4 The RIA process contributes to improving economic efficiency through an analysis to identify those aspects of regulation that can limit consumer choice or reduce the degree of competitiveness in the economy. Also, this process allows for determining and minimizing the possible burdens for legal entities, especially for small and medium-sized enterprises, as well as for citizens. Since the process envisages consultations with stakeholders, the RIA enables to identify the unanticipated and unwanted effects that previously could not be perceived. At the same time, the RIA contributes to the respect of the principles of good governance as it increases the transparency and the legitimacy of the regulatory process. The involvement of stakeholders in the process ensures the protection of their interests and the ability to model policies according to the needs of the stakeholders, thereby increasing the likelihood of respect and achieving the objectives of the regulation. Finally, this process also contributes to increasing efficiency and effectiveness in the public sector by improving the quality of the regulatory preparation process and the analysis of the possible impacts, costs and benefits from the proposed solutions, thus establishing optimum solutions to achieve the goals. Basically, the RIA has a double role:
Show more

17 Read more

Forfás Input to the Services Directive Regulatory Impact Assessment

Forfás Input to the Services Directive Regulatory Impact Assessment

College Dublin produced a study of the economic consequences of WTO trade-liberalisation scenarios for Ireland. This paper acknowledged the complexity of impact assessment regarding services trade liberalisation stating: “to model service liberalisation requires quantitative estimates of trade barriers. However, unlike the case of agriculture and manufacturing, in services these barriers tend be qualitative rather than quantitative in nature. Such barriers include the existence of national monopolies in service sectors, restriction of certain activities to domestic firms or regulation on the establishment and operation of foreign service providers” 9 .
Show more

23 Read more

Comparing the Content of Regulatory Impact Assessments in the UK and the EU

Comparing the Content of Regulatory Impact Assessments in the UK and the EU

Previous research highlighted the problem of poor economic analysis. Our method does not tell us whether in a given item (say, social effects or the environmental costs of a new proposal) the regulator has carried out good or bad analysis. To do so, one has to practically re-run the IA and answer the question whether better evidence on social effects or environmental costs was available and was not used. We adopted a much narrower definition of quality – that is, comprehensive consideration of what the official guidelines say. We have also reasoned that when there is no point in examining a given category of costs and benefits in an IA, the coding should not report this as 0. But clearly when we entered a 1 we were unable to say whether the IA item was filled in with the best available evidence and analysis, or average, or poor. If we look at our admittedly narrow approach to quality, suitable for a large-n analysis, the two systems seem to live up to their expectations: IA in the UK and the EU has become an instrument geared towards the economic analysis of policy proposals. The EU, however, seems to have made an effort to stay close to the original template of integrated impact assessment, outperforming the UK on the estimation of social and environmental effects. For instance, the emphasis on setting specific and operational objectives is on the rise, thereby suggesting a sort of paradigm shift from a US-style IA to an IA model geared towards policy consistency and coherence. In this sense, the EU system is broader and not exclusively oriented to the economic dimension. If we narrow down economic analysis to specific items of cost-benefit analysis, we see that quantification and monetisation are still relatively problematic areas. But yet again, the EU and the UK do not differ significantly here. The absence of quantification and monetisation in so many IAs may result from the fact that at the moment there are no suitable data, or that it did not make sense to invest a lot of time and resources in these steps, given the limited expected effect of the proposals. One way to control for this is to check whether larger IAs (in terms of total expected costs for example) have on average more depth in quantification than narrower IAs. This is something that could be addressed in future research.
Show more

16 Read more

IMPACT OF REGULATORY INNOVATION ON MICROFINANCE SECTOR: A CASE OF VIETNAM

IMPACT OF REGULATORY INNOVATION ON MICROFINANCE SECTOR: A CASE OF VIETNAM

Although microfinance achievements are affected by many kinds of factors, this paper focuses on the side of regulatory policies. It identifies the existing regulatory gaps in the microfinance sector to recommend functional regulation changes in Vietnam. In other words, it examines how implemented regulation performs main regulation objectives by applying Regulatory Impact Analysis. The regulatory framework has gradually completed, but it might not serve the sector in the right way. There are policy and regulatory inadequacy in microfinance sector that does not meet the needs for sustainable growth. Although focusing on the microfinance institutions’ operation, the overall regulation has created obstacles for sector growth. The regulation policy is much concentration on the Object “Promote safe and sound financial services” that results in good fact for only the breadth of outreach and the quality of micro-loan products. Instead of this, the legislation should pay more attention to protecting the benefit of customers as well as expanding the microfinance market that enables more people to access. It needs appropriate regulation to improve the microfinance sector in the country.
Show more

14 Read more

ALBANIAN SMEs QUEST FOR GROWTH: ADDRESSING ACCESS TO FINANCE ISSUE

ALBANIAN SMEs QUEST FOR GROWTH: ADDRESSING ACCESS TO FINANCE ISSUE

According to the latest SME Policy Index: Western Balkans and Turkey 2019 2 , Albania has made moderate progress in implementing the Small Business Act (SBA). This progress has been evident in terms of improving delivery of public services and simplifying regulations, positive changes that contributed in reducing on small and medium enterprises, as well as improving the overall business environment. Important achievements attained are: setting up procedures for regulatory impact analyses (RIAs) allowing now on to start measuring the impact of new legislation on business competitiveness; legal framework on insolvency proceedings has been strengthened; Registering a business and applying for licences and permits have been streamlined while digitalisation of government services has reduced the administrative burden on SMEs; strengthening of quality standards infrastructure has created more opportunities for Albanian SMEs to be more competitive.
Show more

21 Read more

Understanding Complaints to Regulators About Paramedics in the UK and Social Workers in England: Findings from a Multi-Method Study

Understanding Complaints to Regulators About Paramedics in the UK and Social Workers in England: Findings from a Multi-Method Study

To complainants, it may appear as if the profession is “circling the wagons” and protecting itself from outside threats — the veneer of regulation proves to be simply lip-service and many experience their complaint as unaddressed and unresolved. To practitioners who are the subjects of complaints, it may appear as though regulatory authorities are engaging in unnecessary and damaging quasi-litigation; and the taint of even a preliminary investigation on a practitioner’s confidence and reputation can be significant. Further, it casts the regulatory body as the antagonist of the long-suffering professional, who must endure unnecessary (and unfair) inquiries regarding his or her competence. The binary nature of the current complaints adjudi- cation process may itself be inadvertently contributing to this spiral. As highlighted by the professions of social work and paramedicine, health and care professionals work in complex environments characterized by professional judgment and compromises; there are many circumstances where less-than-ideal solutions may be the only ones realistically available, even if these are unsatisfactory to all parties involved. A binary complaints adjudication system that may be incapable of actually addressing this contemporary reality of practice runs the risk of worsening the situation. There is a need for a rigorous and systematic investigation process, as the sample of cases studied here indicates there were cases of deliberate malfeasance and frank incompetence on the part of practitioners. Such cases are, in many ways, the easiest to manage from a regulatory perspective as they involve clear breaches of ethics, practice standards or competency expectations. However, as highlighted by this study,
Show more

11 Read more

The impact of macroprudential supervision tools on financial soundness in the Southern Mediterranean countries

The impact of macroprudential supervision tools on financial soundness in the Southern Mediterranean countries

The adoption of macro-prudential instruments may enable the regulators in the region to mitigate the impact of external shocks. In the African economies, the macro-prudential tools can complement the monetary and fiscal policies by ensuring the stability and strength of the financial system (Paul, 2013). Many tools have been identified, nevertheless, not all of them are as targeted or effective, in addition, their use depends on the particular circumstances of a country as well as the structure of its economy. Actually, some macro-prudential tools can be identified as they are considered as key indicators; 2.1. The capital adequacy ratio (CAR)
Show more

11 Read more

THE IMPACT OF REGULATORY POLICIES TOWARDS COMMUNITY SUSTAINABILITY IN MANDALUYONG CITY

THE IMPACT OF REGULATORY POLICIES TOWARDS COMMUNITY SUSTAINABILITY IN MANDALUYONG CITY

This study aimed primarily to investigate the impact of effective regulatory policies towards that provide sustainable community of Mandaluyong City in terms of the delivery of basic services for the years 2010-2016. The researcher used qualitative analysis wherein it assesses the documents and accomplishments report gathered in the city records of Mandaluyong. It also used the quantitative approach to distribute questionnaire among the four groups of respondents in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the regulatory policies which provide a programs for the welfare of the local residents. The researcher has a total respondents of 536 based on the recommendation of the local authorities who identified the possible participants of the study.
Show more

17 Read more

Promoting Functional Outcome of Stroke Patients: The Effect of Regulatory Focus, Therapy Frequency and Message Framing
					                
                                    Yang et al.

Promoting Functional Outcome of Stroke Patients: The Effect of Regulatory Focus, Therapy Frequency and Message Framing Yang et al.

Keller and Oyserman (2008) manipulated the likelihood of engaging in eager or vigilant health related behavior. Their results show that individuals with prevention fit engage in more cancer detection behavior to reach their security needs, whereas individuals with promotion fit prefer stimulants to overcome physical weakness. Gerend and Shepherd (2007) manipulated gain and loss-framed messages with regulatory focus to test the persuasive effects of vaccination. A loss-framed message was found to produce stronger vaccination intentions for participants with prevention focus than people with promotion focus. Other health behavior studies also support the theory that there are more persuasive effects if the message framing fits the regulatory focus, such as smoking cessation (Zhao and Pechmann, 2007) , sunscreen use (Keller, 2006), and dental flossing (Uskul, Sherman and Fitzgibbon, 2009).
Show more

16 Read more

Review Article Ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization alters the protein profile expression in endometrial secretion

Review Article Ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization alters the protein profile expression in endometrial secretion

Boomsma and colleagues have elucidated the impact of ovarian stimulation on the levels of key regulatory cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors in endometrial secretion at the time of embryo transfer [12, 14, 45]. Endom- etrial secretions aspirated in the spontaneous cycle 6 days after the LH surge or prior to embryo transfer were analyzed by a multiplex immunoassay. The profile of 17 soluble media- tors included IL-1β, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-15, IL-17, IL-18, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), eotaxin, interferon-γ inducible protein-10 (IP-10), monocyte chemo- tactic protein-1 (MCP-1), Dickkopf homolog-1 (Dkk-1), heparin-binding epidermal growth fac- tor (HbEGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in endometrial secretions have been characterized. A number of mediators were excluded from the panel, either because appropriate antibodies were not available (gly- codelin), or because of problems arising from cross-interference (IL-11, LIF and M-CSF). It has been shown that ten mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12, IL-18, TNF-α, MIF, eotaxin, MCP-1, IP-10, VEGF) were detectable in 90-100% of the sam- ples. HbEGF, IL-5, IL-17, IL-10, Dkk-1 and IL-15 were detected in 23-76%, whereas IFN-γ was not detectable in any of the samples. The endo- metrial cytokine profile differed significantly from cervical mucus [12]. Moreover, significant- ly higher concentrations of IL-1β, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12, IL-17, TNF-α, eotaxin, Dkk-1, and heparin- binding EGF were present in endometrial secre- tions obtained in stimulated compared with natural cycles. The IL-6, MIF, and VEGF-A were
Show more

8 Read more

Services trade and domestic regulation

Services trade and domestic regulation

Indicators of regulatory intensity and heterogeneity are introduced in a gravity model and their impact on market entry and subsequent trade flows estimated for total services, business [r]

54 Read more

Alcohol promotion via mobile phone apps: gaps in impact evaluation and regulatory coverage

Alcohol promotion via mobile phone apps: gaps in impact evaluation and regulatory coverage

Alcohol is not only the “drug of choice” among young people (Mart, 2011, p. 889), it is also integrated into social life (Wettlaufer et al., 2012). Alcohol misuse accounts for approximately 2.5 million deaths worldwide per year, including over 300,000 young people between 15 and 29 years of age (World Health Organisation, 2010). It also contributes 4.5% of total measured disability-adjusted life years, higher than tobacco at 3.7% and illicit drugs at 0.9% (Donovan, Fielder, & Jalleh, 2011);. Alcohol misuse imposes significant costs on society through factors such as reduced workplace productivity and the impact of alcohol- fuelled violence (Manning, Smith, & Mazerolle, 2013).
Show more

8 Read more

Infrastructure Based Versus Service Based : Competition In Telecommunications

Infrastructure Based Versus Service Based : Competition In Telecommunications

The EU commission has initiated a discussion of a revision of the current and the potential introduction of a new regulatory framework to become effective by 2009-2010 22 . It is clear that access holidays will reduce competitors' ability to offer products and services to consumers. This study shows that this will have negative effects on prices and penetration rates, if neither infrastructure nor service based competition is in place to be able to cut prices and drive penetration, and thus, innovation. This paper clearly shows that in order to maintain competition, service as well as infrastructure- based competition needs to be in place to maximise consumers' benefits. Therefore, regulatory holidays for operators with significant market power who invest in emerging markets shall not be implemented. In order to financially consider the high risk of investment undertaken by operators with significant market power in new and innovative technologies, this is best
Show more

22 Read more

Biomedical Impact of Splicing Mutations Revealed through Exome Sequencing

Biomedical Impact of Splicing Mutations Revealed through Exome Sequencing

tions of the intron, the branch site and the polyprimidine tract located close to the 3′ splice site of the intron (3). Nonetheless, for exon and intron definition, these four splice signals alone are not sufficient. There are several other cis-acting sequence elements within the exons and the introns that signal for binding of specific trans- acting splice factors, which influence the selection of splice junctions. Most RNA- binding domains recognize short cis-acting sequences, and they are guided to the RNA molecule via clusters of such short sequences (4). These regulatory sequences, which could be enhancers or silencers of splicing, recruit specific trans-acting splic- ing factors, such as serine/arginine-rich protein (SR) proteins (2) or neuron-specific splicing factor (NOVA) (4) and guide the localization of the spliceosome. The com- plex network of regulatory cis- and trans- acting factors are involved both in consti- tutive splicing and in AS.
Show more

6 Read more

Implications Of Environmental Factors On The Productivity Of Selected Small And Medium Scale Enterprises In Rivers-State

Implications Of Environmental Factors On The Productivity Of Selected Small And Medium Scale Enterprises In Rivers-State

The concept of business environment according to the business dictionary (2013), can be defined as the combination of internal and external factors that influence a company's operating situation. The business environment can include factors such as: clients and suppliers; its competition and owners; improvements in technology; laws and government activities; markets, social and economic trends. Ask.com (2013) defines business environment as the physical and operational factors, both internal and external, that affect the flow of activities in a business. They include; customers, competitors, suppliers, distributors, industry trends, substitutes, regulations, government activities, the economy, demographics, social and cultural factors, innovations and technological developments. A business is influenced by the environment in which it operates and the success of any business is dependent on its ability to adapt to its environment. The complexity of this reality for business owners is compounded by the fact that there are many different environments that each business operates in. There is the macro environment, which in today’s global economy refers to the whole world, where events often indirectly impact on businesses and there is the microenvironment, local events and circumstances which directly affect and interact with a business. (GIBS, 2013). A business’ environment influences the functioning of the business system. Therefore, a business environment may be defined as all those conditions and forces which are external to the business and are beyond the individual business unit, but they all operate within it. These forces are customers, creditors, competitors, government, socio-cultural organizations, political parties’ national and international organizations etc. Some of these forces affect the business directly whilst some others have an indirect effect on the business (Blurtit, 2013). According to the Institute of Chartered Accountants study pack (2009) business environment can be defined as a set of factors or conditions that are external to the business but which have influence on the operations of the business enterprise. External in the context means that these factors or forces are not usually within the control of the business enterprise. It further describes it as the web of forces which form the setting in which the firm makes its decisions.
Show more

8 Read more

Some international perspectives on legislation for the management of human-induced safety risks

Some international perspectives on legislation for the management of human-induced safety risks

The regulation of major-hazard installations in South Africa does not consider vulnerability and sustainability science. There is scope for further research into the impact of major- hazard installations on the vulnerability, coping capacity and human-induced disaster resilience of communities. We are of the opinion that the UK, followed by EU countries, is furthest advanced with regard to the implementation of legislation to regulate major-hazard installations. However, the international comparison of South African safety legislation should be expanded to other industrialised countries such as Australia, Japan, China, Singapore, Mexico and Canada. In addition, lessons learnt from EU countries and others should be researched to identify similarities with the South-African situation.
Show more

8 Read more

Futures Trading In Rubber- Are The Stakeholders In Kerala Benefitted?

Futures Trading In Rubber- Are The Stakeholders In Kerala Benefitted?

The impact of Literacy Programmes conducted had helped increase investor base. There is a positive impact among the investors due to financial literacy programme initiative by Government of India and market regulators, which helped increase in trading turnover beyond the top 100 cities in India up to 30% from 466,000 clients in 2013-14 to 606,000 clients in the year 2014-15 as per the interview given to livemint.com by Mr.Ravi Varanashi, chief (Business Development), NSE India Ltd. This indicates that time has come to concentrate more on rural parts of India as the potential and need for financial literacy is evident from the increase in trading activity in recent years. It would be
Show more

6 Read more

Patterns of biomedical science production in a sub-Saharan research center

Patterns of biomedical science production in a sub-Saharan research center

while also taking international contexts into considera- tion. Importantly, the generation of interesting future research questions is also an important outcome of this study. So far social sciences have mainly assessed the impact and benefit of global interventions on the health- care systems in sub-Saharan Africa and the quantitative patterns of biomedical publications of the African scien- tists. This study points out the need for additional ques- tions concerning the contents of scientific production as well as their links and potential impact on the long-term economic and social development in sub-Saharan Africa. To do so, we assume the posture, based on our finding, which an integrative approach would focus on specific questions to understand the dynamics of building-up the research institutions, the changes, if any on the elabora- tion on scientific contents considering the surrounding local economic, social and cultural needs. The methodo- logical implications of such a project would be similar to the scientific frame at the Kenya Medical Research Insti- tute, which considers the ethics of biomedical research in the contexts of sub-Saharan Africa and transnational research as a central process for the acceptability and validity of the global scientific enterprise in poor commu- nities. More social science studies, research teams, and projects located within the clinical research site learning from the daily interactions with the scientists when they doing science [10-12] are needed. Additionally, as sug- gested by our findings, social and human activities as well as organizations are embedded, which allows one to assume that they should be studied using the paradigm that they affect each other in a dynamic manner [13,14]. Conclusion
Show more

7 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...