representational state transfer

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Representational State Transfer API Life Cycle Management

Representational State Transfer API Life Cycle Management

ABSTRACT: REST (Representational State Transfer) is stateless, client-server, cacheable communications protocol. REST uses HTTP for all four CRUD operations. In REST each data element is a resource, addressed by a URI. Media type is the name of a specific format or schema of a representation. Within an organization all API should be consistent and should have easy access. While designing REST API all information should be stored at one place for standardization. For that there will be one repository for Mime-type and Swagger documents. Developers will consume REST APIs and they need documentation, for that Developers Portal is required. It is useful for user to get all the information at one place. It will use repository created earlier. There should be some automation which will check implemented REST API’s matches with Documented REST API’s. All above steps are called as REST API life cycle management tool. By using this tools it will be easier to integrate with other tools.
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Applying representational state transfer (REST) architecture to archetype-based electronic health record systems

Applying representational state transfer (REST) architecture to archetype-based electronic health record systems

Another design goal was to create an architecture that allows and encourages rapid prototyping and end user innovation, regarding for example user interfaces (in- cluding EHR navigation [r]

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Web Services: Architectural Styles and Design Considerations for REST API

Web Services: Architectural Styles and Design Considerations for REST API

Web Services have been used since many years as an interface between applications. Web Services such as Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) and Representational State Transfer (REST) are extremely useful in data transfer and comparatively faster. Creating a Web Service saves the hassle for all developers as the tedious work such as building the database, automating the system and even performing SQL or other database queries is taken away. With such hassles out of the way they can just jump into building what they intended to and leverage this data using our proposed web service.
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IBM Mainframe Makeover: What Powers Your Mobile Applications and Smart Phones

IBM Mainframe Makeover: What Powers Your Mobile Applications and Smart Phones

The principal objective of this paper is to demonstrate the capabilities of legacy mainframes to support and use in smart phones and mobile applications devices. Legacy mainframes are trusted backbone platforms for executing critical business transactions. They are robust, reliable, scalable, and most importantly, resilient. Mainframe ecosystems have evolved to stay relevant, and despite their bad press, they have contributed to major technology milestones in the last decade.96 of the world's top 100 banks, 23 of the top 25 US retailers, and 9 out of 10 of the world's largest insurance company’s still use mainframes. Mainframes process roughly 30 billion business transactions per day, including most major credit card transactions and stock trades, money transfers, manufacturing processes, and ERP systems. Across the globe, more people now use mobile devices as their primary means of obtaining information and requesting services over the Internet. This shift is due to the convenience of being able to carry devices wherever they go, along with their user-friendly and intuitive nature. There have been many discussions on how to integrate the different capabilities and features of mainframes with the features that are required on a mobile application. The introduction of web services capabilities in CICS Transaction Server V3 provided the fundamental building blocks of service connectivity, enabling the adoption of service-oriented architecture (SOA), and underpinning today’s mobile solutions. CICS has continued to add new capabilities to the run time. From a mobile perspective, the introduction of the CICS TS Feature Pack for Mobile Extensions provides JSON and Representational State Transfer (REST)-conforming (RESTful) web service support, further enhancing the options for enterprise applications to mobile devices. Customers around the world use CICS TS to host hundreds of millions, and in some cases billions, of transactions per day. As the number of mobile devices worldwide continues to grow, so does the variety and volume of workload that they drive. CICS has the capacity to scale up in support of this increasing mobile workload, providing an exceptional platform for hosting mobile workloads.
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Geography, memory and non representational geographies

Geography, memory and non representational geographies

Also, are memories wished away? ‘That which cannot be escaped’? In Thrift’s (2008) non-representational theory (nrt), memory seems underplayed in relation to its close cousins, imagination, emotion, affect. This relative neglect of memory is prevalent else- where in nrg. Pile’s (2009) comprehensive consideration of affective ⁄ emotional geogra- phies and nrg, includes lengthy ruminations on (un)consciousness, thought, language and so on, but memory barely features. Similarly in other key expressions of nrg (Anderson and Harrison 2010; Harrison 2007, 2008; McCormack 2007), ‘affect’, ‘emotion’, ‘body’, ‘self’ are key themes, whereas memory is at best a ghostly presence (for exceptions, see Anderson 2004; Lorimer 2006). Memory makes us what we are, and, along with emo- tion ⁄ affect, forms the interrelating foundational processes of our ongoing lives (Damasio 1999), and is inextricably linked to imagination ⁄ creativity (Greenfield 1997). We are con- glomerations of past everyday experiences, including their spatial textures and affective regis- ters. Memory should not be seen as a burden of the past, rather it is fundamental to
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Energy States of Particles with Representational Spin

Energy States of Particles with Representational Spin

Two systems are studied: a small system with 10 spin 1/2 particles giving 1024 possible states, and a larger system with 20 spin 1/2 particles, with about a million possible states. The system begins in the least optimal state, all spins pointing up, and at each move, a random trial state is generated. If the trial state is more optimal, meaning it has fewer spins pointing up, it is accepted. It is highly probable the first move will be accepted. After many moves, the likelihood of improvement diminishes. We consider three “times” to illustrate the relative movement slowing at large time: after 9, 81 and 729 moves, so the moves are evenly spaced in log time. The simulation is run one million times for the small system, and one hundred thousand times for the large system. The results are displayed in Figure 1 and Figure 2, and are consistent with the calculation of predicted number at each, as shown in Table 1 and Table 2, below.
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Understanding Tourism Development: A Representational Approach

Understanding Tourism Development: A Representational Approach

The current study investigated hotel employees’ and tourism students’ representations of “tourism development” using an associative imagery task. The results show that hotel employees and tourism students share a common representational field that moves from an economic dimension to a more holistic approach of tourism development, taking in a wider range of variables. Tourism development is not only associated with economic growth but also has social, cultural, political and ecological implications for respondents. Recognising the validity of these perceptions of which ethical and moral dimensions are an integral part, highlights the necessity of taking into account social values and practices when planning.
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Mathematical Representational Code Switching

Mathematical Representational Code Switching

being acquired. Students simultaneously understand some portion of the language communicated (or the content of such) and fail to understand some other portions as those are slightly beyond their current level of linguistic acquisition, outside of their realm of experience, and to some degree beyond their level of linguistic production. While students can receive and understand most of the communication from another, they cannot independently construct the ideas in the second language. Complementing the notion of comprehensible input, Swain (1985) and Swain and Lapkin (1995) promote the concept of comprehensible output, where language learners may internalize ideas but recognize gaps in linguistic production which limit their ability to communicate the ideas in the second language. Selinker (1972, 1992) posits the notion of interlanguage, an individualized, distinctive linguistic code a learner employs as he or she acquires a second language. These codes generally share the common characteristic of: containing patterns of language transfer from the student’s native language(s); demonstrating overgeneralization and overapplication of rules in the second language; retaining a fossilization of linguistic errors, particularly in adult learners; and constantly changing and developing throughout the language learning process.
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Examining the relationship between perception and reahty in the context of a historical view^ of the virtual.

Examining the relationship between perception and reahty in the context of a historical view^ of the virtual.

illusion in representational painting, and the phenomena of virtual reality!. This led to an.[r]

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Realism and Its Representational Vehicles

Realism and Its Representational Vehicles

Continuing  the  exploration  of  connections  between  the  philosophy  of  art  and  the   philosophy  of  science,  some  have  suggested  that  theories  and  models  should  be  seen   as  akin  to  works  of  literature  and  thus  should  be  regarded  as  fictions  (see  Frigg  and   Hartmann,  2006).  This  view  is  motivated  not  just  by  the  claim  that  models  are   creations  of  human  imagination,  just  like  novels  and  plays,  but  also  by  the  thought   that  like  the  latter,  models  have  a  ‘life’  or  rather,  internal  structure,  of  their  own   which  can  be  explored  and  developed  and  which  can  yield  surprising  results.       Thus  Frigg  takes  models  to  be  objects  in  the  sense  that  Sherlock  Holmes  or   Frodo  are  objects  –  namely  objects  of  our  imagination  (Frigg  2010).  Drawing  on   Walton’s  view  of  literary  fictions  as  representational  in  the  sense  of  functioning  as  a   props  in  certain  games  of  make  believe,  (Walton  1990),  model  descriptions  should   also  be  seen  as  props,  with  the  relevant  rules  given  by  that  description,  together   with  the  relevant  background  theory,  the  assumed  mathematics  and  so  on  (Frigg   2010).  This  description,  and  the  associated  rules,  may  become  fleshed  out  or   otherwise  developed  as  time  goes  on,  so  this  account  can  accommodate  the  shift   from  a  partially  baked  idea  to  a  more  solid  suggestion  to  something  about  which  the   question  can  be  asked,  ‘does  this  correspond  to  the  target  system?’  (ibid.,  p.  260).       However,  Toon  argues  that  Walton’s  antirealism  about  fictional  characters   sits  uneasily  with  Frigg’s  account  (Toon  2012,  pp.  57-­‐59).  Consider:  according  to  the   latter,  model  M  represents  some  real  system  S  if  and  only  if  M  denotes  S  and  there  is   some  ‘key’  that  tells  us  how  facts  about  M  can  be  translated  into  facts  about  S.  But  if   one  imports  Walton’s  anti-­‐realist  stance  and  applies  it  to  models,  then,  strictly   speaking,  there  can  be  no  facts  about  M,  and  no  relevant  relation  can  be  established   between  models  and  target  systems.  
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Research Poetry and the Non-Representational

Research Poetry and the Non-Representational

By adopting an approach to geographical fieldwork that was informed by non-representational theory (see Dewsbury, 2010), the aim of the research was to immerse myself in acts of ‘doing’ so that I might experience therapeutic art making as a practice. My own artistic practice of painting became the springboard for collaborations with others; so that I might experience modes of therapeutic art making that were unfamiliar to me. This participation in a range of art forms enabled me to later think through practice in the creation of the poetry, discussed here, and the production of a series of works of ekphrastic art (see Boyd, 2017). The art work was an experiment in translating video and audio captured in the field into new artistic forms capable of providing some capture of the non- representational geographies of therapeutic art making. The aim of the poetry was the same, except in this case I wanted to experiment with the capacities of language and poetic form to convey the affective and experiential force of the intendant research encounters.
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Representational strategies in the novels of Hermann Burger

Representational strategies in the novels of Hermann Burger

Nizon here does not distinguish between the 'Yolk' as the reactionary backbone of the state, and their representation as such by dominant political discourses; a distinction Burger draws[r]

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The Representational Power of Discrete Bayesian Networks

The Representational Power of Discrete Bayesian Networks

In fact, naive Bayes can represent nonlinear functions (Zhang and Ling, 2001a). For example, let A = { 1 , 2 , 3 } , B = { 1 , 2 , 3 } . A function f is defined as in Figure 3. Obviously, it is not linearly separable. However, there is a naive Bayes that represents f . Consider a Naive Bayes G on two specific nominal attributes A and B, where A = {1, 2,3}, B = {1, 2,3}. Table 1 is the conditional probability table (CPT) for A, and B has the same CPT as A. It is easy to verify that the classification of G is the same as in Figure 3. Thus, f is representable by G. Therefore, naive Bayes can represent some, but not all (as we will see later), nonlinear functions in the discrete domain. The exact representational power of naive Bayes in the discrete domain is still unknown.
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Deterministic amplification of Schrödinger cat states in circuit quantum electrodynamics

Deterministic amplification of Schrödinger cat states in circuit quantum electrodynamics

As the transmon is in fact a multilevel system, there is the potential for additional levels to affect the state transfer. We therefore simulated a single STIRAP-type state transfer from the ∣ 0, +ñstate to the ∣ 0, -ñ state both with and without a third transmon level. The results are shown in figure B1. While the frequencies of the microwave must be adjusted to fit the new energy levels of the system, the pulse envelopes, their amplitudes and overlaps are identical. Crucially this means that the transfer does not have to be performed more slowly when a realistic transmon is introduced.
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Using Integer Manipulatives: Representational Determinism

Using Integer Manipulatives: Representational Determinism

Different opinions have been proffered regarding misuses of representations in mathematics instruction. Berenson et al. (1997) opine that a teacher’s knowledge of mathematical content, teaching, and learning are intertwined; therefore, teachers with limited content knowledge are less effective in appropriately using resources and representations in developing students’ understanding. Duval (2006), on the other hand, suggests a need for the representations themselves to also be taken into consideration since comprehension does not lie sequentially from the content of a representation to the pure mathematical concept. This paper agrees with Duval and approaches the question of misuses of representations and how focusing on the representations themselves through the construct of representational determinism can mitigate them. Our aim is to investigate the following questions:
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Slow Violence and the Representational Politics of Song

Slow Violence and the Representational Politics of Song

There is a strong history of resistance in the UK’s coalmining areas, through direct opposition to coalmine owners and to the government, and through self-help. During the nineteenth century, the miners came to realise that they needed to represent themselves, to gain an education and to set up their own welfare structures (Bennett et al 2001). The setting up of the unions played a big part in this. In Horden, the miners had their own Welfare Fund, which provided ambulances, doctors, sports facilities and the public park many years before the creation of the UK’s Welfare State, all paid for by contributions from the miners themselves. This was a community based on an industry where workers depended on each other for their lives – and this spirit carried forward into looking after themselves and each other.
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Representational Pattern of Discursive Hegemony

Representational Pattern of Discursive Hegemony

Discursive hegemony is molded out of a series of particular discourses which have more or less legitimate norms on the basis of social hierarchy or other socially naturalized conventions. In addition, hegemony is never the property of an individual; only if the group keeps together does it belong to a group and remains in existence. So, it is natural that hegemony confined to a particular social group must contain a representational point of view in terms of voicing of social events. Different people or social group may encode the same event in distinct way, which is mainly de- pendent on social conventions formulated by “ideological state apparatuses” (ISAs). ISA, according to Althusser (1971/2001: p. 96), is concerned with “a certain number of realities, which pre- sent themselves to the immediate observer in the form of distinct and specialized institutions”. In simple word, an ISA is an institu- tion; modern society contains the religious ISA, the educational ISA, the family ISA, the political ISA, the legal ISA, the trade union ISA, the communication ISA, the cultural ISA, and so on. Those ISAs consisting of a kaleidoscope of gorgeous society represent the same world differently according to their own in- terests or conventions and then have discourses of their own in- dependent of each other. For instance, the meaning of the word “militant” in trade union ISA is different from than that in politi- cal ISA. In the business institution, “militant” is interpreted as a synonym of “activist” whereas it may be used as a synonym of “subversive” in the political institution, both of which take di- verse representations by using the same word. However, the lexical item is one of linguistic units that are used to represent the world. There are a number of other linguistic units (especially clause) means to represent our inner and outer experience. Clause, as a way of representing patterns of experience, has been elabo- rated in detail within the theoretical framework of Systemic Functional Linguistics. According to the linguistic theory, clause, in the sense of experiential function, mainly consists of three components, that is the process, participants in the process and circumstances associated with the process. The grammar of the clause is very useful to explore the particular way of representing the world, not to mention the particular way of conceptualizing power. The choice of the three components in clause reflects the more or less prominence emphasized by interlocutors in order to give voice to their point of views of experiences. Consider, for example:
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Locating and Representing Pain

Locating and Representing Pain

As we know, however, there are pathologies that may lead this synchronicity astray. Let’s consider the case of the phantom limb. In such a case the body map and the actual body become discernible because the 1:1 ratio is not preserved. In the phantom case, the allegedly descriptive component of my pain report (“my left arm”) doesn’t pick out any part of my body. It seems, then, that the cognitive pointing, or its linguistic counterpart, misses the target. However, in such a case, I suggest, reference isn’t lost. Since the relevant part of the body is missing, cognitive pointing “hits” the filler of the cognitive role of the missing limb; in this case, it picks the representational component of the content of my pain state, the represented body part. In the phantom case, the underlying metaphysics is something like: “I feel pain where I represent my [arm/leg/…] to be”. What we have, then, is a representational pain, one that preserves the PAI features of pain, but does not have the damaged body part as an element of its content. The represented arm plays, in the representation, the same functional role that the real arm was playing in the real body. So, the cognitive pointing picks it out because of this fulfilment.
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Elucidating Ubiquitin Chain Formation Catalyzed by E2 Enzymes through use of a Di Ubiquitin Probe

Elucidating Ubiquitin Chain Formation Catalyzed by E2 Enzymes through use of a Di Ubiquitin Probe

meaning that T5.2 firing must co-occur with the presence of prey often enough. We can defer to signal detection theory to determine the threshold pr(prey|T5.2) that must be met in order for toads to catch prey often enough (Godfrey-Smith 1991; Bradbury and Vehrencamp 1998). For each variant that does not meet this threshold, the costs of engaging in prey-capture behavior will not outweigh the benefits. Those that carry too much information will also incur costs since information is expensive (Bradbury and Vehrencamp 1998, p. 444). Natural selection will favor the toad variant which produces T5.2 firing in the presence of prey closest to the threshold pr(prey|T5.2). To summarize, a state R will be selected for carrying information about C when pr(C|R) comes closer than any extant competitor to a threshold conditional probability that minimizes the costs and maximizes the benefits to the organism containing R. Note how this explanation satisfies the computational level of explanation, which explains how an organism’s perceptual capacities are tuned to enable the organism to track states of the environment.
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