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An econometric analysis of charitable donations in the Republic of Ireland

An econometric analysis of charitable donations in the Republic of Ireland

This paper has used the Irish Household Budget Survey to analyse the factors that affect the probability and size of charitable donations in the Republic of Ireland. A tobit model and a double-hurdle model with an inverse hyperbolic sine transformation (IHS) of the dependent variable are applied. The double-hurdle model captures the process of giving to charity significantly better than the univariate tobit approach applied in the majority of previous studies. This implies that zero observations are part explained by non- economic factors and not just standard corner solutions as suggested by the tobit model. The results suggest that there are many household characteristics and variables which affect whether or not a household donates to charity. In addition, this paper has demonstrated that the IHS transformation is an important and necessary addition to the econometric modelling of charitable donations.
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Invisible from view: leaving and aftercare provision in the Republic of Ireland

Invisible from view: leaving and aftercare provision in the Republic of Ireland

Up until the 1960s most social welfare-type services, as they existed (including the Industrial and Reformatory Schools) were operated, managed and delivered by the Catholic Church, with some state support in the form of capitation funding. In essence the state adopted a laissez faire approach and the Catholic Church held responsibility in this area. In the period between the 1960s and 1970s the state began to expand its role in the social sphere, evidenced by the passage of the Health Act, 1970 and the roll-out of free second level education. In the 1980s there was a retraction of social welfare services in the context of a recession. The remarkable economic growth experienced in the Republic of Ireland in the 1990s – the so called ‘Celtic Tiger’ led to some optimism that the spoils would be shared amongst all sections of society (Boucher and Collins, 2003).
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Keynote address by Commissioner Richard Burke to Conference on Transport in Northern Ireland and Republic of Ireland -common problems: common solutions, organized by Co-operation North. Belfast, 22 September 1983

Keynote address by Commissioner Richard Burke to Conference on Transport in Northern Ireland and Republic of Ireland -common problems: common solutions, organized by Co-operation North. Belfast, 22 September 1983

BY COMMISS.IONER RICHARD BURKE TO CONFERENCE ON "TRANSPORT IN NORTHERN IRELAND AND REPUBLIC OF IRELAND COMMON PROBLEMS : COMMON SOLUTIONS" ·organised by Co-Operation North The Queen's Un[r]

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Centres of research excellence in economics in the Republic of Ireland

Centres of research excellence in economics in the Republic of Ireland

In terms of international reputation and scale, it is difficult for any individual institution in the Republic of Ireland, hereafter referred to as Ireland, to have an internationally-competitive research profile that would be able to match the larger-scale international institutions. Furthermore, and equally important in terms of government strategy, and indeed for the future health of the profession, no single institution has the scale to mount a structured postgraduate programme that would be in the top ranks globally, and consequently to attract from the top rank of potential graduate students. Lubrano et al. (2003) suggest that ranking the research of Departments of Economics would impact on the choice of graduate students looking for a PhD programme in Europe: “He [sic] will be looking first for a supervisor (a person) and second for a scientific environment (an institution)” (p. 1367). To be credible, such a postgraduate programme or set of interrelated programmes would require a sizeable number of well-published researchers to deliver postgraduate courses and supervise PhD-level dissertations.
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<p>The Impact of Inherited Retinal Diseases in the Republic of Ireland (ROI) and the United Kingdom (UK) from a Cost-of-Illness Perspective</p>

<p>The Impact of Inherited Retinal Diseases in the Republic of Ireland (ROI) and the United Kingdom (UK) from a Cost-of-Illness Perspective</p>

Abstract: To date, there has been a global lack of data regarding the prevalence of conditions falling under the Inherited Retinal Diseases (IRD) classi fi cation, the impact on the individuals and families affected, and the cost burden to economies. The absence of an international patient registry, and equitable access to genetic testing, compounds this matter. The resulting incomplete knowledge of the impact of IRDs hinders the development and commissioning of clinical services, provision of treatments, and planning and implementation of clinical trials. Thus, there is a need for stronger evidence to support value for money to regulatory bodies for treatments approved, and progressing through clinical trials. To ensure a strategic approach to future research and service provision, it is necessary to learn more about the IRD landscape. This review highlights two recent cost-of-illness reports on the socio-economic impact of 10 IRDs in the Republic of Ireland (ROI) and the United Kingdom (UK), which demonstrate the compre- hensive impact of IRDs on individuals affected, their families, friends and society. Total costs attributable to IRDs in the ROI were estimated to be £42.6 million in 2019, comprising economic (£28.8 million) and wellbeing costs (£13.8 million). Wellbeing costs were estimated using the World Health Organization (WHO) burden of disease methodology, a non- fi nancial approach, where pain, suffering and premature mortality are measured in terms of disability-adjusted-life- years (DALYs). In the UK, wellbeing costs attributable to IRDs were £196.1 million, and economic costs were £327.2 million amounting to £523.3 million total costs in 2019. Accounting for over one-third of total costs, the wellbeing burden of persons affected by IRDs should be emphasized and factored into reimbursement processes for therapies and care path- ways. This targeted review presents the most current and relevant data on IRD prevalence in the ROI and the UK, and the impacts ( fi nancial and non- fi nancial) of IRDs in terms of diagnosis, wellbeing, employment, formal and informal care, health system costs, deadweight losses and issues surrounding payers and reimbursement. This review demonstrates IRD patients and their families have common issues including, the need for timely equitable access to genetic testing and counselling, equality in accessing employment, and a revision of the assessment process for reimbursement of therapies currently focused on the cost-of-illness to the healthcare system. This review reveals that IRD patients do not frequently engage the healthcare system and as such suggests a cost-of-illness model from a societal perspective may be a better format.
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vCJD risk in the Republic of Ireland

vCJD risk in the Republic of Ireland

yr 1997–2000), was therefore felt to be representative of the baseline level of non-UK beef as a proportion of total UK beef imported to Ireland (average 15,729 tonnes/ yr 1988–1995). Therefore approximately 9% of Irish imports from the UK were from non-UK scources. Of the remaining 91%, half was subsequently exported, leaving 45.5% of UK exports ultimately consumed in Ireland. Thus 45.5% of the 8% of total UK exports which make up 20% of total beef and beef products produced each year in the UK reach and are consumed in Ireland. Total BSE exports to the Republic of Ireland was therefore 0.26% of UK total (20%*8%*45.5%*(35% + (65%*1%)) = 0.26%). Assuming that 827 500 BSE infected cattle were slaughtered for consumption in the GB and NI, 2,148 'cat- tle equivalents' would have been exported and ultimately consumed in Ireland. These approximations do not take into account the timing of the SBO bans which were intro- duced in 1989 in the UK and 1996 in Ireland. They are taken into account in the mathematical model however. Travel to the UK
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Trends in economic vulnerability in the Republic of Ireland

Trends in economic vulnerability in the Republic of Ireland

In the context of the absolute gains enjoyed by even the most disadvantaged members of these socio-economic groups, it is difficult to see that the changes in relativities we have observed can be characterised as involving any substantial increase in the level of polarisation. However, the modest changes in relativities should not obscure the fact that at both points in time socio-economic disparities are of a very substantial scale and do mark Ireland out as being characterised by levels of inequality that place it at the more unequal end of the European spectrum (Whelan and Maître, 2005). Notwithstanding such inequalities, the dramatic reductions in levels of vulnerability and multiple deprivation across the socio-economic spectrum demonstrate beyond doubt that the gains from economic growth have been widespread.
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Trade union finance in Republic of Ireland

Trade union finance in Republic of Ireland

For the period 1945-70 concerned, i t can be seen that average contribu­ tions per member were not sufficient to cover average expenditure per member for the entire period; i n fact, ave[r]

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The distribution and redistribution of income in the republic of ireland

The distribution and redistribution of income in the republic of ireland

The study compares the distribution of direct income with the distribution of final income, after all taxes both direct and indirect have been paid, and benefits both in cash and in kind[r]

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Earnings and Low Pay in the Republic of Ireland

Earnings and Low Pay in the Republic of Ireland

The solution to the problem of low incomes is not just related to pay rates but to the amount of work people do. The more work a household does, the less is risk of poverty. Our problem in Ireland is that we have the highest levels of very low work intensity households in the EU. The households with least work are 27 times more likely to be at risk of poverty than those with most work. Evidence suggests that moderate increases in the National Minimum Wage (NMW) do not have a significant effect on employment. There may be some effect on hours worked and we need more research on that. We do not know what effect higher increases in the NMW might have. We must balance any possible tradeoffs between increases in NMW and availability of work.
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Environmental accounts for the Republic of Ireland: 1990 2005

Environmental accounts for the Republic of Ireland: 1990 2005

High quality data is by and large limited to emissions to air originating from energy use. Data on emissions to water are largely absent, as are observations on toxic chemicals and heavy metals. There is no data available on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) in Ireland. POPs are chemicals that remain in the environment for long periods of time and can accumulate in the fatty tissue of organisms. These pollutants are contained in a variety of insecticides and pesticides but there is no published data relating to their existence or density in Ireland. Land use data is also scarce. Considering the rapid development of Ireland in the last decades, it would be an important variable to examine. It is also not possible to examine the potential effects on wildlife and the environment as well as the health effects on the population of endocrine disrupters as no data is available on their presence in Ireland.
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Crime in The Republic of Ireland: Statistical Trends and their Interpretation

Crime in The Republic of Ireland: Statistical Trends and their Interpretation

THE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL RESEARCH INSTITI.FFE Taken together, the national and the urban/rural trends are evidence of a substantial transformation in the level and pattern of Irish crime,[r]

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Economic aspects of alcohol consumption in Republic of Ireland

Economic aspects of alcohol consumption in Republic of Ireland

It must be emphasised that the data of Table 3 refer to expenditure on alcohol, and not to quantities consumed:' Since expenditure equals price times quantity, the data suggest either th[r]

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The economic evaluation of road investment in the Republic of Ireland

The economic evaluation of road investment in the Republic of Ireland

The benefit of Road Improvement The main benefits from raising the level of service on the National Primary Network are time savings, a reduction in accidents and vehicle cost savings.. [r]

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Economics of crime in Republic of Ireland   exploratory paper

Economics of crime in Republic of Ireland exploratory paper

Summary of conclusions The analysis has shown that the necessary conditions for an optimal crime rate, as expounded b y the Becker model, cannot be assumed to hold in the Irish case... R[r]

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Concentration in manufacturing sector of Republic of Ireland

Concentration in manufacturing sector of Republic of Ireland

The net output in each establishment size class was not given for these industries As a result, the minimum and maximum estimates were calculated with reference only to the upper and low[r]

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Regional Employment Patterns in the Republic of Ireland

Regional Employment Patterns in the Republic of Ireland

THE PATTERN OF EMPLOYMENT IN ~96I a The conventional classification According to the conventional classification of economic activities into primary, secondary and tertiary sectors, ther[r]

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Crime Victimisation in the Republic of Ireland

Crime Victimisation in the Republic of Ireland

However, the relative incidence of various forms of property crime, the rate of reporting of vietimisation to .the Gardai, and the types of households most likely to become victims also [r]

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Workplace innovations in the Republic of Ireland

Workplace innovations in the Republic of Ireland

Standardised employee involvement index = 1st principle component of following three items PC weights is parentheses...[r]

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Information Guide: Ireland  April 2016

Information Guide: Ireland

   Higher Education in Ireland: Universities in Ireland Nation Master: Education in Ireland: Statistics Wikipedia: Education in The Republic of Ireland Employment information     [r]

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