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The Public Library Research Programme in the Republic of Ireland

The Public Library Research Programme in the Republic of Ireland

The policy report, Branching Out – Future Directions (2008), reviewed the development of the public library service under Branching Out and made recommendations for the next five years. It notes the implementation of the recommendations to establish a funded research programme and that a significant body of research had been undertaken, but sees the need to ensure the

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Equality and Discrimination: Lessons from a Research Programme and a Conference

Equality and Discrimination: Lessons from a Research Programme and a Conference

In his paper on racial inequality, William Darity describes the widespread perception that the US is a ‘post-racial’ society, and illustrates this cogently for the general population using survey data. He argues that this perception also permeates much of conventional economics. It does so in two major ways. First, the individual is at the centre of economic thinking - not a racial or ethnic group, or a social class. Second, conventional economic theory argues that market competition drives out discriminatory practice: profits and prejudice are mutually exclusive. Darity’s ‘stratification economics’ research programme was developed in response to deficiencies identified in conventional approaches to discrimination. Evidence from this body of research strongly contradicts the idea that the US has become a post-racial society. In fact Darity argues that a post- racial society is not the ideal, and he calls instead for a ‘race fair’, not a ‘race blind’ society.

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A research programme for queer studies

A research programme for queer studies

But the absence of “fixed referent[s]”, which is so frequently emphasized (albeit all too often with a merely ritual function) in queer theory is in no way arbitrary or merely cosmetic. The foundational and definitional gesture of queer, on the theoretical as on the political plane, as I remarked at the outset, is the questioning and deconstruction of categories and their con- sequent deontologization; this gesture cannot have a fixed referent because its nature is by definition abstract, since the plane on which it takes place is purely logical. Unfortunately, in the vast majority of cases, this questioning and deconstruction has been exclusively focused on a narrow and com- pletely predictable range of categories (gender, sexuality, sometimes – for particularly adventurous theorists – ethnicity; class is curiously absent...); and this lack, at the same time, of imagination, and of intellectual, ethi- cal, and political courage threatens to reduce queer merely to one of the many theoretical labels, interchangeable in their irrelevance, available in the department store of postmodern academia. But the cause of this gap in the historical development of queer is to be sought in a far more serious and deeper fault, of an epistemological and theoretical nature: even though the texts which established queer studies as a lively and innovative voice in the academic and political arenas were published almost thirty years ago, queer studies have yet to develop any kind of research programme which can give indications as to how exactly its mission of questioning and deconstruction could be carried out. 7

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HERA Joint Research Programme ‘Cultural Encounters’

HERA Joint Research Programme ‘Cultural Encounters’

The objectives of this interdisciplinary project are to explore the migrant experiences of Middle Eastern Christian communities in Europe in order to identify the cultural encounters taking place and to examine their impact on defining and shaping identities. The European context is central to understanding the sim- ilarities and differences of these experiences and can add to current understandings of the categorisation of migrants and its implications on integration and the construction of identity within migrant groups. The case studies of the Coptic Orthodox (sub-state but global identity), Suryoye (Assyrians / Syrians – transna- tional supra-state identity) and Iraqi Christians (state identity) offer several strategies of identity construction including diasporic, particularistic and national. These in turn are shaped by existing integration strategies and church-state relations. The case study countries of the United Kingdom, Denmark and Sweden allow a cross- country comparison of these cultural encounters, while exploring the transnational nature of the communities. Through the use of core but contested concepts, nota- bly identity, minority, diaspora, transnationalism and integration, the project seeks to advance knowledge on the following issues. First, the factors that determine identity strategies will be outlined. Second, the inter- nal debates within the communities relating to these cultural encounters will be examined with acknowl- edgement that different communal actors compete for influence and that variables such as gender, generation and migration patterns also have an impact. Third, the perceptions of these encounters in the host coun- tries will be identified at both state and societal level. Finally, the relations between the communities and other migrants from the homeland will be explored with reference to experiences in the homeland. Through in- terviews, fieldwork, archival research and workshops, this project will address Middle Eastern Christian mi- grant experiences from a social and cultural perspective while analysing the implications of these encounters, thus contributing to a wider understanding of the im- pact of faith-based communities on European states and societies.

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Unlocking export prosperity: An introduction to the research programme

Unlocking export prosperity: An introduction to the research programme

The AERU was recently commissioned by the High Value Nutrition Challenge to review the international literature on ‘country of origin’ studies (Miller et al, 2016a). Agri-food science is currently grappling with this issue internationally; see the recent contributions by Bechtold and Abdulai (2014), de-Magistris and Gracia (2014), Lim et al. (2014), Ortega et al. (2014 and 2015), Van Loo et al. (2015) and Viegas et al. (2014). Related research by the research team has already attracted international attention (Saunders, 2013; Tait et al, 2016a, 2016b); Dalziel et al, 2017). Figure 3.1 lists the relevant major programmes in New Zealand. The research team for Unlocking Export Prosperity is connected to all these programmes. The AERU is leading the Integrating Value Chains project funded by Our Land and Water National Science Challenge (Saunders et al, 2016e). Professor Saunders is science leader for Theme 1 of that Challenge (OLW, 2017). Dr Harker is leading High Value Nutrition National Science Challenge Consumer Insights Programme (Harker, 2016). Health and wellness, for example, are important food and beverage attributes being researched in that Challenge, which has implications for Unlocking Export Prosperity.

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Evaluation of the Applied Research Programme

Evaluation of the Applied Research Programme

The level of college involvement also depends upon personal contacts between the college researchers and the companies. "Researchers" in this context refers to the full-time staff who manage the ARP projects as opposed to the research assistants who are employed to carry out work on specific projects. Annex 4 contains a list of the participating researchers by college and project. The 442 projects were spread across 18 colleges (including the five DIT Colleges and Thomond College) and managed by 274 researchers over the six-year period. In twelve of the colleges ten or more researchers participated in ARP projects. This indicates that participation in the programme is spread fairly evenly across the technical colleges with the exception of Kevin Street (DIT) which accounted for 19% of the researchers involved in ARP.

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HERA Joint Research Programme: Outcomes and Achievements

HERA Joint Research Programme: Outcomes and Achievements

It is HERA’s ambition to contribute to the achieve- ment of such a vision. But even if we come down to the level of short-term and immediate impact, I think we can say that HERA has achieved some results already. Firstly, it has shown that it is possible to pool the resources of several national research councils in a truly pan-European spirit, overcoming the chal- lenges and obstacles of differing national traditions, eligibility rules, funding mechanisms and so on. Secondly, it has demonstrated the value of team-based research (which is not to deny the continuing role of the solitary scholar, though perhaps that figure is in fact something of a myth in the first place – all scholars continually share and collaborate among colleagues in a myriad of informal ways). Structured team research is not easy, of course. There is no denying the real diffi- culty and challenge of building and managing research projects involving multiple countries, disciplines, and personalities, as I am sure all of the HERA project leaders will attest: but there is always the belief that the whole can be greater than the sum of its parts – and the acknowledgement that some research questions by their very nature require teamwork to be tackled.

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Better communication research programme : 2nd interim report

Better communication research programme : 2nd interim report

The research evidence therefore indicates that, in general, children with developmental language difficulties are at greater risk than typically developing children of having behavioural, emotional and social difficulties (BESD) but the pattern is complex and relationships with language not always evident. Such data raise questions about the causality of the relationships between language and behaviour. As part of the BCRP we aimed to elucidate these issues by examining behaviour difficulties in two different groups of children with SLCN – a cohort of pupils attending a mainstream secondary setting (Study 1) and children attending a tertiary diagnostic centre (Study 2). In both cases parents had completed the strengths and difficulties questionnaire (Goodman, 1997). Study 1 analyses data from a group of year 7 secondary school pupils who scored average or below average in year 6 on the Key Stage (KS) 2 English standard assessment test (SAT). In addition, for this mainstream sample, teachers and pupils had completed the questionnaire and had been identified with SLCN in year 7 for a language intervention study (Joffe, 2011). Study 2

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Climate Variability and Predictability  Climate Research   The Challenge for the 21st Century

Climate Variability and Predictability Climate Research The Challenge for the 21st Century

CLIVAR, a World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) project The World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) was established in 1980 by the International Council for Science (ICSU) and the World Meteoro- logical Organization (WMO) with the mandate to develop the fundamental scientific understanding of the physical climate system and climate

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Wounds Research for Patient Benefit : a 5 year programme of research

Wounds Research for Patient Benefit : a 5 year programme of research

One of the perennial challenges of conducting research in real-life clinical settings is the need to balance the requirements of research against the need to minimise the research burden on clinicians and patients. Data collection in community nursing tends to be paper based as the nurses are working away from the office, typically in patients ’ own homes, and mobile computing for community nurses was almost non-existent at the time of our prevalence survey and the planning for the register pilot. Furthermore, and crucially, clinical notes tend to stay with patients in the home as an essential clinical reference for the next care provider who visits, thus any method of data collection for both clinical and research purposes needs to reflect this. Although we were developing a protocol for the complex wounds register, an opportunity arose to trial smart pens for data collection purposes within the tissue viability service and we grasped this opportunity as one of the original aims of the research programme was to investigate alternative data collection methods. The smart pen explored in this pilot was a digitalised pen developed by a company called Destiny Wireless plc [see www.destinywireless.com (accessed July 2011)]. The pen uses paper technology along with ‘ Anoto functionality ’ . It enables users to enter data into digitised forms, transmit the data electronically to the company ’ s secure servers and then have the data relayed back to their own computer system or destination of choice.

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Can we predict the climate for the 21st Century

Can we predict the climate for the 21st Century

CLIVAR, a World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) project The World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) was established in 1980 by the International Council for Science (ICSU) and the World Meteoro- logical Organization (WMO) with the mandate to develop the fundamental scientific understanding of the physical climate system and climate

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Wounds research for patient benefit: a 5-year programme of research

Wounds research for patient benefit: a 5-year programme of research

One of the perennial challenges of conducting research in real-life clinical settings is the need to balance the requirements of research against the need to minimise the research burden on clinicians and patients. Data collection in community nursing tends to be paper based as the nurses are working away from the office, typically in patients ’ own homes, and mobile computing for community nurses was almost non-existent at the time of our prevalence survey and the planning for the register pilot. Furthermore, and crucially, clinical notes tend to stay with patients in the home as an essential clinical reference for the next care provider who visits, thus any method of data collection for both clinical and research purposes needs to reflect this. Although we were developing a protocol for the complex wounds register, an opportunity arose to trial smart pens for data collection purposes within the tissue viability service and we grasped this opportunity as one of the original aims of the research programme was to investigate alternative data collection methods. The smart pen explored in this pilot was a digitalised pen developed by a company called Destiny Wireless plc [see www.destinywireless.com (accessed July 2011)]. The pen uses paper technology along with ‘ Anoto functionality ’ . It enables users to enter data into digitised forms, transmit the data electronically to the company ’ s secure servers and then have the data relayed back to their own computer system or destination of choice.

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How to manage Strategies? : a study from a programme management point of view in the Dutch business market

How to manage Strategies? : a study from a programme management point of view in the Dutch business market

There are two methods used in this research to collect data: face-to-face interviews and a web- survey in the form of questionnaires. First the face-to-face interviews are conducted. One of the advantages of the face-to-face interviews is to be able to observe and record nonverbal as well as the verbal behaviour (Babbie, 2004). The interviews are based on the theoretical framework and provide a broader input for the web-survey. The outcomes of the interviews are tested with the online questionnaires in a large population. A survey research is one of the best methods available for collecting original data with which a population can be described that are too large to observe directly (Babbie, 2004). The web-survey is tested to ensure that the content of the questionnaires is understandable for the group in which they are conducted. Employees of the organisations in the business market need to evaluate the implementation of the strategy they are involved in at the moment or they were involved in the past. To get a representative sample at least 50% of the population need to fill in the questionnaire, this amount is adequate. Higher is always better of course, 60% is good, 70% is very good, and 80% or higher is excellent (Babbie, 2004). The outcomes of the interviews and the web-survey together form the input for the final conclusion of the research.

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Evaluation of the SEND pathfinder programme: impact research brief

Evaluation of the SEND pathfinder programme: impact research brief

The pathfinder approach used with the initial cohort of families appeared to involve, on average, 42 hours compared to 30 hours for non-pathfinder families (completing the comparative SEN Statementing process), although there was a wide variation across and within areas. However, we recognise that it is it very early days and processes are likely to change significantly over the coming months. Therefore, it is possible this initial estimate will differ markedly from the eventual outcome. To address this, additional research will be undertaken in the extended evaluation to further explore the issue.

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An Evaluation of the Further Mathematics Support Programme : Research Report

An Evaluation of the Further Mathematics Support Programme : Research Report

enrichment activities accessed were reported to have improved student motivation; enabled students to explore mathematics in context; engage with problem solving; gain an insight into what careers were possible with mathematics qualifications; provide positive role models for girls. Team challenges had allowed the students to develop their capacity to work together. In general, teacher interviewees were also positive about Area Coordinators and on-line support. Irrespective of their roles, engagement with the programme or Further Mathematics security, teachers were overwhelmingly positive about the FMSP and the programme continues to be held in high regard by teachers. A teacher at one centre reported that the FMSP support was

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The translation research in a dental setting (TRiaDS) programme protocol

The translation research in a dental setting (TRiaDS) programme protocol

While there is an increasing amount of research look- ing into medical professional behaviour, there is a dearth of examples of translation research in dental set- tings. One UK study has investigated the effect of audit and feedback and computer-aided learning in primary dental care [16]. Neither intervention was developed using a theoretical framework and neither influenced evidence-based third molar management. Another UK study, the ERUPT trial [17], examined the effect of a specific fee-for-service and of a general education course (implementing evidence-based practice) on the number of fissure sealants placed. The trial found significantly more fissure sealants were placed by GDPs offered fee- for-service compared to current practice (a general capi- tation award), but no statistically significant effect of the education intervention. The study contributed to the incentives in healthcare provision debate and led to a policy change with the introduction of a direct fee for this treatment. General dental services are complex small businesses providing a mixture of NHS and pri- vate dental care. Although dental practices are subject to regulatory requirements, there is considerable varia- tion in how these are implemented. Therefore, dental practice in Scotland provides the ideal setting for trans- lation research, with generalisable features across other healthcare services, and the opportunity to influence policy is real.

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The translation research in a dental setting (TRiaDS) programme protocol

The translation research in a dental setting (TRiaDS) programme protocol

While there is an increasing amount of research look- ing into medical professional behaviour, there is a dearth of examples of translation research in dental set- tings. One UK study has investigated the effect of audit and feedback and computer-aided learning in primary dental care [16]. Neither intervention was developed using a theoretical framework and neither influenced evidence-based third molar management. Another UK study, the ERUPT trial [17], examined the effect of a specific fee-for-service and of a general education course (implementing evidence-based practice) on the number of fissure sealants placed. The trial found significantly more fissure sealants were placed by GDPs offered fee- for-service compared to current practice (a general capi- tation award), but no statistically significant effect of the education intervention. The study contributed to the incentives in healthcare provision debate and led to a policy change with the introduction of a direct fee for this treatment. General dental services are complex small businesses providing a mixture of NHS and pri- vate dental care. Although dental practices are subject to regulatory requirements, there is considerable varia- tion in how these are implemented. Therefore, dental practice in Scotland provides the ideal setting for trans- lation research, with generalisable features across other healthcare services, and the opportunity to influence policy is real.

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Looking both ways: a review of methods for assessing research impacts on policy and the policy utilisation of research

Looking both ways: a review of methods for assessing research impacts on policy and the policy utilisation of research

Not only does the overall choice of approach influ- ence the assessment findings, but also specific meth- odological choices. Some methodological issues were common to both research impact and research use assessments. For example, issues to do with the tim- ing of assessment to best capture research impacts or use. In addition, purposeful sampling and the number of case studies conducted influenced how predictive or transferrable the assessment findings were [17, 24, 54]. There were also tensions within both streams between the value of utilising the most comprehensive and robust methods of assessments possible and the resources required for these methods. Case studies, including interviews with study participants, were considered the gold standard method of assessment, but resource intensive to conduct [55]. Policy case studies were particularly time and resource intensive, requiring careful consideration of historical and contextual influences, hence the predominance of single policy case studies amongst the research use assessments we examined [24]. On the research impact side, methods utilising automated data extraction from policy documents and electronic surveys of researchers have been introduced [6, 56]. Such methods are less resource intensive and offer greater potential for implementation on a wide scale, but there is still limited information available about their

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Social Science Research in the Fifth Framework Programme

Social Science Research in the Fifth Framework Programme

channelled to the thematic programmes and key actions. The proposed IHP action Harnessing socio-economic research to the needs of European society was designed to meet this purpose. Dr. Mitsos explained that the preliminary draft of this action made available for discussion at the workshop offered three broadly defined themes and issues:- ‘Societal trends and structural changes’; ‘New development models encouraging growth and employment’; and ‘Governance and citizenship’ (Appendix 1). The present overall emphasis on major processes of social, economic and political change was designed to tap into and attract the research interests of the main social science disciplines. Accompanying actions to provide research training networks and fellowships and research infrastructure support would reinforce the social science research capacity to tackle these themes. Clearly, these broad themes would need to be narrowed down in order to focus research on policy-orientated goals.The greater specification of the research questions would have to come about through interaction between social scientists and policy-makers. In this way, the

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Measuring research impact: a large cancer research funding programme in Australia

Measuring research impact: a large cancer research funding programme in Australia

Translational research has been an important con- tributor to reduced cancer incidence and increased sur- vival. However, the process of translating research into policy and practice is often convoluted and slow. It is commonly stated that it takes an average of 17 years for research evidence to be translated into clinical practice [3–5]. With growing competition for the fundraising dollar, charities are under increasing pressure to demon- strate and report the impact of their work to the com- munity, and governments are seeking to allocate scarce resources effectively. As a result, researchers are increas- ingly being asked to demonstrate the impact of their re- search in terms of improved treatments and health gains to inform funding decisions [6].

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