Role of the teacher

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ICT in education: The role of the Teacher Training

ICT in education: The role of the Teacher Training

As described in the first paragraph, the main research question concerned the future learning environment and the teacher’s prospective role. To know more about this future, several scenarios on future developments in education have been studied. Because many scenarios have already been completed Published studies were scanned especially for the role and impact of ICT. Furthermore, experts were heard about this topic, gathered additional information on the role of the teacher by visiting schools where ICT is already being used ‘extensively’. Information on organizational level was gathered and interviews were conducted with teachers. These interviews were aimed at the teacher’s tasks, roles and required competencies to fulfill these tasks and roles properly. In addition, literature on job profiles of teachers and implementation literature was studied. 1.4 Results
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The Role of the ESP Practitioner as Business English Teacher

The Role of the ESP Practitioner as Business English Teacher

A significant difference in approach exists between a teacher and a trainer. Whilst a teacher is traditionally considered as an educator whose task is to instruct, educate, and teach learners to enable them to be soaked in their life, a trainer is a person whose main role is to change a person’s behaviour or ability to enable them to perform specific tasks or do particular jobs successfully (Frendo, 2005). A teacher as trainer in this context refers to BE teachers working in training organisations where they offer customised training programmes intended for particular participants for a short period. In this case, content specialist of business course is not a prerequisite to becoming a trainer, yet being au fait with the learner’s field is the most important. Such familiarity can be employed as a vehicle to ensure effective teaching (Ellis and Johnson, 1994). To exemplify, whereas training is ‘job-oriented’, teaching is ‘person-oriented’ (Briedger, 1997). That is to say, if language teachers help students learn a language for various purposes; a trainer trains them to behave adequately – both linguistically and pragmatically.
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Negotiating Place, Identity, and Role; First Experiences as a Teacher Leader (What is the Experience of a Teacher Moving into a Teacher Leadership Role?)

Negotiating Place, Identity, and Role; First Experiences as a Teacher Leader (What is the Experience of a Teacher Moving into a Teacher Leadership Role?)

In their respective positions as instructional coach, lead teacher, and consultant, teacher leaders are to implement and in many cases, lead educational reforms by modeling and encouraging changes in pedagogy and practice. This complex leadership role necessitates constant negotiation as teacher leaders gauge when and how they may encourage, direct, and support the teachers they work with. Further complicating this role is its non-supervisory nature; teacher leaders are not to evaluate their colleagues for employment purposes nor can they discipline or reprimand them. Instead, teacher leaders must rely on their credibility as experienced educators and their ability to encourage and support. Teachers who move into teacher leadership positions report that this transition is complicated by a need to balance collegial relationships while at the same time provide constructive criticism. This phenomenological inquiry, based upon lived experience descriptions from teacher leaders, examines two of the first interactions of newly appointed teacher leaders: meeting the staff and visiting the classroom. The paper provides insight into the negotiation process teacher leaders go through as they assert and define their role with their
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EXAMINING THE ROLE OF THE MENTOR IN TEACHER EDUCATION IN ZIMBABWE

EXAMINING THE ROLE OF THE MENTOR IN TEACHER EDUCATION IN ZIMBABWE

As the term implies, during the teacher education programme the student teacher and the mentor have to focus on the development of competencies that will assist the student to become a competent teacher. The focus is on helping the student teachers to acquire professional qualifications in teaching practice. The competencies that have to be developed are functional competencies; personal competencies; and meta-competencies (Cheetham and Chivers, 1998). Within the context of these competencies there are at least four aspects that we are concerned with in the development of the student teacher. These are the professional knowledge base of the student teacher, teaching skills, lesson evaluation and assessment of pupils‟ work (Maynard and Furlong, 1992) (Edwards and Collison, 1996). The role of the mentor within the context of the competence model is that the mentor becomes the coach and the student teachers are given responsibilities over their class. Such an arrangement enables the student teachers to teach as they learn and learn as they teach. This promotes the student teachers chances of trying their own ideas. If the student teachers are to develop the competencies noted above it is important that they have full control and responsibilities of their classes with the mentor coming in as a coach. The metaphor of a coach is important in that the coach in a football team assists players during training, and on the day of the match the players are on the field for the 90 minutes on their own. The players take responsibility for what goes on during the 90 minutes of play, whilst the coach can come in with ideas that may help the player at half time the responsibility to perform is the player‟s. The focus on competencies is premised on the understanding that they are predictors of future performance and success (McClelland, 1973). Through the model student teachers are expected to apply the knowledge, skills, abilities, behaviours, and perform critical teaching tasks (Ennis, 2008). The mentors in both models are facilitators of learning.
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Considerations on the role of teacher autonomy

Considerations on the role of teacher autonomy

The definition of teacher autonomy has been subject to discussions and they reflect, more than the evolution over time, different points of view of those who offer them. For some authors it refers to “the teacher’s ability and willingness to help learners take responsibility for their own learning” (Thavenius, in Cotterall and Crabbe 1999 : 160) According to this definition teachers reflect on their role and find ways to change it to adapt to the new students’ roles, to help them on their way to autonomy and independence. There is a clear link between the two types of autonomy, but the greater emphasis is placed on students because teacher autonomy is achieved through their change.
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A QUALITATIVE APPROACH TO STUDY THE ROLE AND IMPORTANCE OF INQUIRY-BASED LEARNING: PROFESSIONAL LEARNING EXPERIENCE OF TEACHER-EDUCATORS AND STUDENT-TEACHERS IN INITIAL TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS

A QUALITATIVE APPROACH TO STUDY THE ROLE AND IMPORTANCE OF INQUIRY-BASED LEARNING: PROFESSIONAL LEARNING EXPERIENCE OF TEACHER-EDUCATORS AND STUDENT-TEACHERS IN INITIAL TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS

Thus, student-teachers comments to teachers’ teaching style were the least positive. Student-teachers reported that inquiry-based teaching styles involve them actively though teachers were conventional in their teaching style and did not pay much attention to student- teachers’ needs. Thus, there is an inconsistency in what teacher-educators claim and what student-teachers say. Student-teachers are more likely to report what happen in the classroom. Though, student-teachers responded that they had fewer opportunities using inquiry-based activities by their teachers, therefore, they did not feel prepared on their experiences; that make them realise the importance of inquiry-based pedagogy in learning science. In addition, the teachers also often expressed the view that they should provide suitable instruction and guidance for student-teachers before asking student-teachers to engage in any inquiry and that they had reservations about accepting the principle “inquiry is about seeking the right answer” as applied to student-teachers. Consequently, they prepare model answers (i.e. teacher-made notes). Thus, this study found that the role of teacher to interact with student- teachers takes the form of questions in ITE in Pakistan. Although, the teacher-educators used the terminologies of group work, discussion, open questions, so on, they did not discuss the substance of all the mentioned terms. It can be noted that they did not know or think about how these approaches would contribute to students’ learning.
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The role of the teacher in the acquisition of counting skills

The role of the teacher in the acquisition of counting skills

Ms J began her day with the whole cl ass s i t t i n g on the car pet f o r some language a c t i v i t y . The p r e - r e g i s t r a t i o n language a c t i v i t i e s were u s u a l l y c h i l d - i n i t i a t e d discussions f ol l owed by more d i r e c t e d teachi ng s i t u a t i o n s (cf Cummings 1982). The c h i l dr e n then moved as d i r e c t e d to the a c t i v i t i e s which had p r e v i o u s l y been set out on the t a b l e s . They did not have a f i x e d base at which to work. I n d i v i d u a l c h i l d r e n did not have t h e i r own p e n c i l s and rubbers, the teacher p r e f e r r e d a group sharing system where m a t e r i a l s were used from a c e n t r a l pool on the t a b l e . The or g a n i s a t i o n was such t h a t c h i l d r e n r e a l i s e d what to do when in d i f f i c u l t i e s and what to do when they had f i n i s h e d t h e i r p a r t i c u l a r tasks. Ms J was a TASK-FOCUSED teacher r a t he r than a TIME-FOCUSED t each er . The c h i l d r e n completed a def ined t a s k , or set of t asks, then moved onto something d i f f e r e n t r a t h e r than working on tasks f o r the period of a lesson. The c h i l d r e n were placed i n t o f i v e colour groups f o r o r g a n i s a t i o n a l purposes. There was f r e q ue n t
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The Role Of The Teacher In Problem Solving Activities

The Role Of The Teacher In Problem Solving Activities

process of solving a problem, the teacher should try to involve students in the. problem and the process of her research, using the motives for self-realization,[r]

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ROLE OF TEACHER IN INCULCATION OF SELF AWARENESS

ROLE OF TEACHER IN INCULCATION OF SELF AWARENESS

The task of the teacher is to contribute towards this process of fostering genuine values. Teachers often face the temptation to limit themselves to imparting information rather than preparing their pupils for life. The pressures of academic requirements often stifle the efforts of well meaning educators who struggle hard to fire their students with enthusiasm for higher ideals. Hence teachers in this challenging process of transmitting values are most warmly welcomed. Every subject can be means of building good character and values. Some examples are given below:
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Inclusive Teaching – The Role and responsibilities in Primary School, Case of Kosovo  (Early experience of inclusive teachers in Kosovo)

Inclusive Teaching – The Role and responsibilities in Primary School, Case of Kosovo (Early experience of inclusive teachers in Kosovo)

Inclusion of special needs of students in primary education is a challenge that requires additional effort, training, motivation, a sufficient level of sensitivity and patience. Many other authors have written on this topic and we recommend Gardner (2005) that concludes that beliefs, norms, or values affect the role of the teacher in the classroom, his attitude to the children, and the procedures he used to help 'Qualified appropriate forms of educational support in a comprehensive inclusive process. "The challenge is not to classify skilled and least-skilled individuals, but to develop them in accordance with individual abilities" meaning that each child can learn and advance in accordance with their individual abilities.
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The Role Of Speech Culture In Teacher Activity

The Role Of Speech Culture In Teacher Activity

The inappropriate use of the above makes the daily speech as well as the artistic speech dark. Every teacher should work to ensure that his speech is at the level of literary standards. Inadvertent use of language means, which are peculiar to their dialect, also distorts speech. But dialectic and barbarism can also serve as an artistic and aesthetic task in the language of the work of art, and serve to the realization of the author's specific ideas and intentions. Other words that are used inappropriately in speech are called barbarisms. Jargon is the words and phrases used by a group of people to convey their own meaning and use it to separate themselves from the majority.
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THE IMPORTANCE OF THE ROLE OF A TEACHER

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE ROLE OF A TEACHER

A good teacher is the one who: is a master in the subjects to be taught, always thinks to improve the teaching techniques, always tries to improve quality of students (quality results), regards 'needs assessments' to help students meet their academic and learning requirements.In the words of Susan Sheldon, USA, “A good teacher never forgets what it is like to be a learner - vulnerable, anxious and dependent! Remembering this, a good teacher looks at a student and sees "only the soul of a human being". A student is a teacher's equal - both leading each other to grow in knowledge, both learning about 'self' and not playing a power struggle for today, both smiling in satisfaction for a job well done!”https://www.unicef.org/teachers/teacher/teacher.htmA teacher's professional duties may extend beyond formal teaching. Outside of the classroom teachers may accompany students on field trips, supervise study halls, help with the organization of school functions, and serve as supervisors for extracurricular activities. In some education systems, teachers may have responsibility for student discipline.Around the world teachers are often required to obtain specialized education, knowledge, codes of ethics and internal monitoring.
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Teacher Self-efficacy and Emotional Regulation as Predictors of Teaching Stress: An Investigation of Iranian English Language Teachers

Teacher Self-efficacy and Emotional Regulation as Predictors of Teaching Stress: An Investigation of Iranian English Language Teachers

stress and how they deal with it. This claim is corroborated by Kyriacou and Sutcliffe (1978), stating that durable personality characteristics are influential in how individuals perceive stress. In the same line, individuals' perceptions and interpretations are highlighted over external factors in how people react to stressful stimuli, given the centrality of one's cognitive appraisal (Boyle, Borg, Falzon, & Baglioni, 1995). Teacher self-efficacy is defined as teacher's belief in one's ability to take any necessary action for successful accomplishment of a particular task in a specific context to happen (Tschannen-Moran, Woolfolk-Hoy, & Hoy, 1998). To date, some studies have examined the potential role of self-efficacy in work stress among employees in various contexts (e.g., Grau, Salanova, & Peirò, 2001; Law & Guo, 2015; Siu, Spector, Cooper, & Lu, 2005; van Dijk, 2009). However, few empirical studies have continued such a line of inquiry in the field of education with the prime focus on teachers (e.g., Collie, Shapka, & Perry, 2012; Klassen & Chiu, 2010; Yu, Wang, Zhai, Dai, & Yang, 2014). There seems to be a dearth of research examining self-efficacy and job stress among English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teachers. An exception is the study done by Vaezi and Fallah (2011) which will be elaborated upon in the literature section of the paper.
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EMERGING TECHNOLOGY IN REDEFINING THE ROLE OF TEACHERS

EMERGING TECHNOLOGY IN REDEFINING THE ROLE OF TEACHERS

Telementoring is mentoring at a distance. More specifically, it is a type of long-term, online relationship between an older, experience person and one or younger, .less experienced people. In it most common usage, the term "Telementoring" refers to a practice in which teacher purposely orchestrate long- term, online relationships between their own students and a number of knowledgeable volunteers. Telemeters may be drawn form the community surrounding a school or form around the world; they can provide many different forms of assistance to students, form the provision of career advice to guidance on a specific school project or investigation. Online mentoring, also called "e-mentoring" and "telementoring," holds great potential for both learners and teachers.
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ESTABLISH THE POSITION OF TEACHER IN ISLAMIC CULTURE

ESTABLISH THE POSITION OF TEACHER IN ISLAMIC CULTURE

G. Reflections on teacher behavior and its impact on student behavior teacher should not assume they have a valid reason between their words and deeds, and finally there is a dichotomy. But must try to always act according to your words and commands and prohibitions, for example, he can not feasible sanctions which it is committed, or his action and its commitment not to introduce obligatory or recommended inviting people to do practical work as his own, but deny the action, To contrast and contradiction of his actions and words not negligible, short, teacher and student case in terms of the role of student to teacher acts as a seal proposition is all roles and images that are reflected there in October. The role of the school to get more help and guidance than high school to high school and university students will be, so we must act and teacher's behavior is consistent with his speech.
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HUMAN VALUE AND TEACHER EDUCATION

HUMAN VALUE AND TEACHER EDUCATION

Human values are closely integrated with human life. They are intertwined with our day to day chores. No human life is possible without values. Yes every living human being lives by certain values. It is only the proportion and combination of negative and positive values, which separates a noble human being from a not so noble human being. How a human value can be develop, either by education or teacher education or Role of human value in teacher education, then all the process will revolve around the teacher.

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The interpretive approach and bridging the 'theory practice gap' : action research with student teachers of religious education in England

The interpretive approach and bridging the 'theory practice gap' : action research with student teachers of religious education in England

In 2010, a change of government signaled changes to teacher education policy and the emphasis switched from raising the academic level and status of ITT courses to pursuing a wholly school-based approach. The justification for this made reference to the importance of increasing ‘‘on the job’’ oppor- tunities to acquire professional skills and ‘‘some evidence’’ that student tea- chers view their university based training as ‘‘too theoretical.’’ 3 At the time of writing the government’s policy and rationale are meeting with strong opposition. 4 This is giving new impetus to the long-standing and inter- national debate about effective teacher training and the role of academic study and theory within this. 5 Thus the research has new relevance and will be presented below in its original context and in relation to more recent developments and debates.
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The Strategy of Civic Education Teacher Deliberation in the Effort to Develop Teacher Professional Competence

The Strategy of Civic Education Teacher Deliberation in the Effort to Develop Teacher Professional Competence

Teacher effort to develop professional competence can be done by various ways, one of them is through MGMP which is related to the importance of effort to develop teacher professional competence. Based on result study, it can be analyzed that the strategy of Civic Education MGMP in developing teacher professional competence can be done through various ways. The essence of professional teacher is teacher who capable to give the best service for his/her teachers with special ability they posses, so students can receive and understand the material which is delivered. A teacher not only demanded to posses educative technical ability in doing his/her task, but also should has character which can be reliable so he/she can become role model for students, family and community. The development of teacher professional character urge teacher potential development continuously in accord with teaching need of each teacher.
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Effective Methods of Supervising Student Teachers in Special Education Environments

Effective Methods of Supervising Student Teachers in Special Education Environments

Supervisors must be able to clearly define their role as well as that of the student teacher, set appropriate timelines for teacher-preparedness, teach the tenets of a construct[r]

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Eliciting teachers’ understanding and their reported practices on school-based formative assessment: Methodological challenges

Eliciting teachers’ understanding and their reported practices on school-based formative assessment: Methodological challenges

in evaluating student performance at the primary and secondary school levels. This is understandable that before the reform of SBA, the traditional classroom assessment in primary schools in Malaysia has been conducted in a highly summative way for a long time, that is, teachers were used to assess students‟ learning outcomes with summative assessing purposes rather than students‟ learning process with formative assessing purposes. However, the new reform of SBA requires teachers to make a paradigm shift from assessing student learning outcome only to assessing both student learning outcome and student learning process. In case of that, if a teacher did not equip with adequate knowledge of what FA is and how to implement FA, the teacher will likely practice FA in ineffective way or even decline their FA practices in classroom and continue the summative mode of classroom assessment which he or she was accustomed to implement before, as Taras (2007) had illustrated in his study that the conceptual confusion of assessment for learning (AfL) with assessment of learning (AoL) results in teachers being less likely to adopt AfL as a strategy in their classrooms.
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