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History 783: An Introduction to Russian and East European History

History 783: An Introduction to Russian and East European History

Description. History 783 is designed as a capstone course for the Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies' interdisciplinary MA program in Russian and East European Studies. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to some of the most important issues in modern, twentieth-century, Russian and East

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Academic Standards Committee - Friday 27 May Periodic Subject Review: Report of the Review of Central & East European Studies

Academic Standards Committee - Friday 27 May Periodic Subject Review: Report of the Review of Central & East European Studies

1.3 This was the Subject’s second review: the Department of Central & East European Studies was previously reviewed in February 2005. Since that review, the Alec Nove Chair in Russian & East European Studies was filled in 2006 and the academic staff has grown from 7 to 13 in 2010. It currently consists of 5 professors, 3 senior lecturers (one 0.8 FTE) and 5 lecturers (three 0.3 FTE). Two of the lecturer posts were funded primarily by the Estonian and Hungarian governments. For Session 2010-11, there was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow funded under the EU Commission Marie Curie Outgoing Fellowship Scheme.
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Slavic and East European Newsletter

Slavic and East European Newsletter

address given by one of the leading Slavicists in the U.S., Helena Goscilo, Professor of Russian Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. Prof. Goscilo is a frequent visitor to the OSU campus and a collaborator in various projects of the DSEELL faculty. She writes on contemporary Russian culture, Russian and Polish women's literature, early nineteenth-century narrative fiction, gender issues in literature, Bakhtin, and folklore studies. Prof. Goscilo is a very prolific and interesting writer and editor, as well as an excellent mentor to graduate students. Some of her best known texts include Russian and Polish Women's Fiction (Tennesee, 1985), Fruits of her Plume (ME Sharpe, 1994), Lives in Transit (Ardis, 1995), Dehexing Sex: Russian Womanhood Before and After Glasnost (Michigan, 1996), Russia—Women— Culture (Indiana, 1996, with Beth Holmgren), TNT: The Explosive World of Tatyana Tolstaya's Fiction (ME Sharpe, 1996), and Present Imperfect: Stories by Russian Women (Westview, 1996, with Ayesha Kagal and Natasha Perova). Her most recent book, Politicizing Magic: From Russian to Soviet Wondertales, with Marina Balina and Mark Lipovetsky, is slated for release by Northwestern in early 2005. The keynote speaker for the Friday 3 March
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Russian Japanese relations: What role for the Far East?

Russian Japanese relations: What role for the Far East?

Historically, international relations texts were concerned with determining systematic approaches. Initially, it was assumed the entire system was homogeneous. Rarely were spatial differences and non-European studies considered. Over time this has changed as international relations evolved to include more actors. The rise and fall of powers has meant the epicentre of focus and literature continues to shift. Prior to the industrial revolution and European colonisation, the ancient empires of China, Mongolia and Italy took their turns in dominating the international political economy. The US replaced the European colonists. Since the end of WWH Japan has emerged as an economic superpower. Similarly, the rise of the East Asian Tigers and communism’s collapse attracted substantial attention. Indeed, trends and issues also generate attention and literature. During the Cold War, ideology, free markets, East versus West, North versus South, non-alignment, bipolarism, hegemony, the arms race and game theory were dominant. Since the 1990s, communism’s collapse, transition, democratisation, decentralisation, globalisation and multipolarity have all been in vogue. Moreover, the rise in global communications has meant international relations have become more transparent. With so much information (perhaps too much) trends are more visible. However, the end of bipolarity has meant international relations are no longer as predictable as they once were. Many theories of international relations, based around historical events, have been thrown out of the window. Similarly, theories about the state, statehood and sovereignty have changed. The domestic transition process of the former Eastern bloc has been accompanied by an international systematic metamorphosis that has made the domestic as unpredictable as the international, against a backdrop of increasing numbers of actors.
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East European Entrants to EU: Diffidently Yours

East European Entrants to EU: Diffidently Yours

remarkable degree of consistency across the nine cases. As Figure 1 shows, the percentage of valid “yes” votes was higher in countries where a smaller proportion of the voters decided to vote on accession to the EU and lower where more people went to vote. In other words, how likely voters are to participate in a referendum on accession appears to be inversely related to their opinion on accession, their country’s opportunities within the European Union, and the EU’s geopolitical project in general. On this basis, it is reasonable to conclude that most of the voters who did not bother to vote are those opposing accession. This is exactly the kind of result you would expect if opponents of accession had a reason to see accession as a fait accompli, a geopolitical transformation process taking place on a grand scale, on a scale over which they do not feel they have control. Given the speed and efficiency with which west European capital and the west European–north American geo-strategic alliance have established their control over that part of the world which has just been left behind by the Soviet geopolitical project, the east European voters’ resignation is quite understandable.
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East versus West on the European populism scale

East versus West on the European populism scale

The only dimension on which Hungary and Poland are completely different from the rest of the Eastern European countries, and in fact from most Western European countries, is their ethnic homogeneity. As regional powers, both Hungary and Poland have ruled over other nations up until the 18 th and the 19 th century. After WWI, however, Hungary lost all regions with mixed populations under the formal jurisdiction of Austria-Hungary. While, Poland after 1920 included sizeable Ukrainian, Lithuanian, and German minorities, the end of WWII saw the creation of a displaced to the West but largely homogeneous nation state. The result is that by the early 1990s, ethnic Hungarians accounted for 98 percent of the population of Hungary, while ethnic Poles accounted for 97 percent of the population of Poland. In this respect, the only Western European countries with similar dominance of the major ethnic groups are Norway and Finland. Both of them also turn out in our statistical tests to be susceptible to right-wing nationalism.
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Serbian and Russian Relations: The Future Implications for Serbia’s Accession to the European Union

Serbian and Russian Relations: The Future Implications for Serbia’s Accession to the European Union

Russian interference within Western Balkan affairs has successfully inhibited their accession to the European Union (EU). This paper explains how the relationship between Serbia and Russia developed since the end of the Cold War and what the foreign relations between the two countries, and other external actors, will look like in the future. Exploring this relationship will illustrate the importance of historical backgrounds within international relations and could give insight on what Serbia’s future accession to the EU will look like. The first part of this paper will present a brief background on EU relations with Serbia and the power of Serbian minorities in neighboring countries. Afterwards, a comparative event history analysis and quantitative data from the Statistical Office of the Republic of Serbia, the Government of the Republic of Serbia, the Serbian National Bank, Eurobarometer and the Observatory of Economic Complexity will be used together to gather evidence of Russian interference throughout different institutional aspects of Serbia. Agreements, public opinion, military exercises and direct / indirect actions will be used to assess the amount of Russian interference and its effects on Serbia and the Serbian minorities that exist in other countries within the Western Balkans. Additionally, an analysis of Serbian political parties and the recent elections bolsters the findings that the current two-track policy, which involves extensive cooperation with Russia and Serbia, will reach a breaking point and Serbia will have to choose one primary ally.
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A Disintegration of European Studies?

A Disintegration of European Studies?

I. The European integration project is in troubled waters. All branches of European stud- ies document its difficulties, explore the reasons and discuss the potential to cure its failings. Diagnoses, of course, differ widely both across and beyond the Eurozone and the European Union, and, unsurprisingly, these debates are not immune to distorted perceptions and wrongful ascriptions. The title of this comment points to a schism which is not new, but which seems to be deepening. The schism mirrors the discrepan- cies in the various disciplines concerned with the integration process. Jürgen Habermas has pointed to them in one of his earlier essays on constitutionalism. 1 Legal scholars
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South-East Asia and Comparative Studies

South-East Asia and Comparative Studies

International  education,  on  the  other  hand,  was  much  more  concerned  with  policy,  planning  and  practical  ways   to   improve   the   education   systems   of   the   ‘developing   countries.’     During   the   1960s   and   1970s,   as   the   European   powers  gradually  relinquished  control  over  their  colonies  in  Africa,  Asia  and  the  Pacific  region  and  as  the  focus  of   attention  went  towards  neo  colonialism  and  educational  dependency  (Altbach  &  Kelly,  1978;  Carnoy,  1974;  Hayter,   1971;  Watson,  1984/2012)  the  two  ‘disciplines’  became  blurred  and  there  was  a  gradual  merging  of  the  two  into   one  overarching  ‘field,’  comparative  and  international  education  (CIE).  This  was  shown  most  clearly  in  Britain  and   the   USA   with   the   creation   of   the   North   American   Comparative   and   International   Education   Society   (CIES)   in   the   1960s  and  the  moves  away  from  a  Comparative  Education  Society  in  Europe  (British  Section)  through  the  British   Comparative  and  International  Education  Society  (BCIES)  to  the  British  Association  of  International  and  Comparative   Education  (BAICE)  (Crossley,  Watson  &  Sutherland,  2007;  Crossley  &  Watson,  2011;  Watson  &  King,  1991).    Within   the  historical  context  of  South-­‐East  Asia  where  all  the  countries,  with  the  exception  of  Thailand,  were  under  some   form   of   European   colonial   rule,   and   where   they   have   been   moving   from   economically   underdeveloped,   (Low   Income  Countries),  to  developing,  (Middle  Income  Countries),  to  advanced,  (High  Income  Countries)  it  is  an  ideal   region  for  researchers  to  use  the  methodologies  of  both  ‘fields.’    
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Some new data on 
		isotope stratigraphy of the Permian rocks at the east of the Russian 
		platform

Some new data on isotope stratigraphy of the Permian rocks at the east of the Russian platform

of the Russian Academy of Sciences) on more than 50 samples of carbonate rocks and fossils (carbonate material of shells) collected from a lot of outcrop sections at the East of the Russian platform (Figure-1, Table-1). Several samples from this collection were measured again in lab of isotope-analytical geochemistry of V.S. Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy (Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences) to revise values  13 С,  18 O

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The East Midlands: A region of the European Union

The East Midlands: A region of the European Union

EMR0P2 is the mainstream regional development programme which allocated 131m to the East Midland 0bjective 2 areas up until the end of 1993 for projects to promote economic development a[r]

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The South East: A region of the European Union

The South East: A region of the European Union

Surrey County Council organised a full programme of events and the European Information Centres ElCs in Maidstone and Hove did the same for Kent and Sussex.. Country-wide events include [r]

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Media Education in Conditions of Visual Turn: European and Russian Experience

Media Education in Conditions of Visual Turn: European and Russian Experience

Let us explain it though explaining the said directions. Scientific direction is aimed at involving of youth into scientific activity. It is implemented though preparation of term papers and graduation qualification thesis (for example: in 2017 the graduation qualification thesis to the topic “Formation of media competence among children and teen agers (on the basis of VLITSEYE88 press-center under Municipal budgetary educational institution Lyceum 88, Chelyabinsk)” – E.A. Blokh). In the process of writing works of this type, the author of the work studies the state of media competence among young generation, theoretical understanding of the problem takes place; effective ways of interaction are defined. As a rule students take part in scientific conferences where their works are judged. The conference “MEDIAEducation” became a very important additional component of working with media literacy in 2016. This conference anticipates the final stage of ImPRO contest and is aimed at theoretical understanding of issues and tasks of media education. Such up-to-date issues of contemporary media education as multimedia youth journalism, way and forms of presentation of media education, media education on the stage of pre-university education and many others have been considered during the conference. The materials of the conference have been published in “Sign: the problematic field of media education”, the scientific magazine of the faculty of journalism and “Mediasreda – 2017 (Media environment—2017)”, the almanac of the faculty.
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Central and east European social policy and European union accession - time for reflections

Central and east European social policy and European union accession - time for reflections

In Central and Eastern Europe the discourse of ‘social policy versus competitive- ness’ is a new agenda, an agenda of the transformational politics. Social policy in Central and Eastern Europe has been formed by the economic discourse of market-mak- ing versus market-correcting policies. According to Zsuzsa Ferge, Central and Eastern Europe became an experimental field of the global market (Ferge, 2000). These coun- tries, if her argument is accepted, were particularly exposed to neo-liberal economic and implicit societal policies. Deacon (1998; 2000) argues, however, that it was not eco- nomic, but instead, political globalisation that impacted heavily on social policy devel- opment in stern Europe, meaning global actors, such as the World Bank, promoting a particular social policy, driven by ideological reasons and views on how social policy should position itself in relation to the market. Similar to European level social policy, post-communist social policy was dominated by market-making features and seriously lacked market-correcting visions on social policy. Price liberalisation was not followed by targeted support for those most hit by the drastic increase in the prices of fundamen- tal goods; the increase of interest rates on mortgages did not continue to offer compen- sation for those taking on highly subsidized home loans before 1989, resulting in tens of thousands of families being threatened by homelessness. Marketisation of the pension and partially the health care system, the cut back in social security payments and bene- fits all served both to remove the burdens from the market in the form of cut-back pub- lic expenditures and to invite private investments into social services and infrastructures. Similarly to the development of social policy at the EU level, social policy formulated in Central and Eastern Europe in the 90s has been closely linked to negative freedom, and in EU context, negative integration. The same struggle seems to appear between lib- eral and social rights. The ‘down the ladder’ themes are taking place in post-communist countries as well. Social rights, despite having been constitutionalised, have been call into question and withdrawn.
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Petrophysical characterization of the lacustrine sediment succession drilled in Lake El’gygytgyn, Far East Russian Arctic

Petrophysical characterization of the lacustrine sediment succession drilled in Lake El’gygytgyn, Far East Russian Arctic

Abstract. Seismic profiles of Far East Russian Lake El’gygytgyn, formed by a meteorite impact some 3.6 mil- lion years ago, show a stratified sediment succession that can be separated into subunits Ia and Ib at approximately 167 m below lake floor (= ∼ 3.17 Ma). The upper (Ia) is well- stratified, while the lower is acoustically more massive and discontinuous. The sediments are intercalated with frequent mass movement deposits mainly in the proximal areas, while the distal region is almost free of such deposits at least in the upper part. In spring 2009, a long core drilled in the lake center within the framework of the International Conti- nental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) penetrated the en- tire lacustrine sediment succession down to ∼ 320 m below lake floor and about 200 m farther into the meteorite-impact- related bedrock. Downhole logging data down to 390 m be- low lake floor show that the bedrock and the lacustrine part differ significantly in their petrophysical characteristics. The contact between the bedrock and the lacustrine sediments is not abrupt, but rather transitional with a variable mixture of impact-altered bedrock clasts in a lacustrine matrix. Physical and chemical proxies measured on the cores can be used to divide the lacustrine part into five different statistical clus- ters. These can be plotted in a redox-condition vs. input-type diagram, with total organic carbon content and magnetic sus- ceptibility values indicating anoxic or oxic conditions and with the Si / Ti ratio representing more clastic or more bio- genic input. Plotting the clusters in this diagram allows iden- tifying clusters that represent glacial phases (cluster I), super interglacials (cluster II), and interglacial phases (clusters III and IV).
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Mass movement deposits in the 3.6 Ma sediment record of Lake El’gygytgyn, Far East Russian Arctic

Mass movement deposits in the 3.6 Ma sediment record of Lake El’gygytgyn, Far East Russian Arctic

During their advance, debris flows become partly diluted and sediment is brought into suspension. The lower density of the suspension leads to a turbid flow above the debris flow that is finally deposited in the lake basin as a normally graded turbidite, both on top and in front of the debris flow. Tur- bidites generated by and directly overlaying debris flows are common in lacustrine and marine settings (e.g., Schnellmann et al., 2005; Waldmann et al., 2010; Rothwell et al., 2000; Strachan, 2008). However, since the debris flows in most cases do not extend all the way to the lake center, the associ- ated turbidites there are more widespread than other MMDs (Schnellmann et al., 2005; Juschus et al., 2009). While the formation of debrites in Lake El’gygytgyn has been shown to be associated with significant erosion of previously de- posited sediments, erosion by turbidites is regarded as minor, despite the genesis from turbulent flow and frequently occur- ring sharp lower boundaries (Juschus et al., 2009). This may be explained by the considerable amount of thin turbidites identified in the 5011-1 cores, denoted by the median thick- ness (2.9 cm in the Quaternary and 2.3 cm in the Pliocene). The generally thin nature of turbidites suggests that most of them could be located distally, as turbidites have been ob- served to grade distally from the source area, resulting in finer and thinner distal turbidites (Sturm and Matter, 1978; Monecke et al., 2004; Girardclos et al., 2007). Therefore, the high number of thin turbidites at the drill site of Lake El’gygytgyn, located slightly to the east of the lake center, might indicate that they may have originated from the west- ern lake slope, which is also supported by the seismic survey. Furthermore, the debris flows may deform previously de- posited sediments that become partially disintegrated, thus leading to the formation of slumps and slides (Fig. 8b and c). Slumps are associated with limited deformation of the sedi- ments, still showing original structures and facies. This sug- gests that the sediments incorporated in the slumps were not transported far away from the area where they were origi- nally deposited. Since slumps are often directly overlain by turbidites, and found overlying debrites, at least twice in the record (D232 at 119.6–121.6 m, D279 at 144.5–148.6 m; Fig. 2), their formation is likely linked to debris flows. For most of the slumps, however, there is no indication of de- bris flows reaching the coring site. Hence, the folding and bending of sediment is assumed to have resulted from defor- mation by a debris flow, but primarily in its front and only occasionally at its base.
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Constitutional Culture of the New East-Central European Democracies

Constitutional Culture of the New East-Central European Democracies

The drafters realized that pluralization of the political spectrum in the new East-Central European democracies, combined with the built-in rigidity of the new constitutions,[r]

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Summer temperature evolution on the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russian Far East, during the past 20 000 years

Summer temperature evolution on the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russian Far East, during the past 20 000 years

(western lowlands and eastern coast) and mountain ranges further inland (Fig. 1b). The mountain ranges, the Sredinny and the eastern ranges, encircle the lowlands of the Cen- tral Kamchatka Depression (CKD, Fig. 1b). The CKD is the largest watershed of the peninsula and is drained by the Kam- chatka River, the largest river of Kamchatka. The river dis- charges into the Bering Sea near 56 ◦ N (Fig. 1b). The cli- mate is determined by marine influences from the surround- ing seas, by the east Asian continent, and by the interplay be- tween the major atmospheric pressure systems over NE Asia and the N Pacific (e.g., Mock et al., 1998; Glebova et al., 2009). In general, the climate is classified as subarctic mar- itime (Dirksen et al., 2013). The winters are characterized by cold and relatively continental conditions since northerly winds prevail over Kamchatka, mainly associated with the Aleutian Low over the N Pacific and the Siberian High over the continent (Mock et al., 1998). In summer, Kamchatka ex- periences warm maritime conditions owing to the East Asian Low over the continent and the North Pacific High (NPH) over the N Pacific (Mock et al., 1998). Furthermore, there are the influences of the East Asian Trough, which has its average position over the Chukchi Shelf, as well as the in- fluences of the westerly jet stream and the associated po- lar front (Mock et al., 1998). Variations in the position and strength of the East Asian Trough affect precipitation and temperature over Beringia and can cause climatic contrasts between Siberia and Alaska (Mock et al., 1998, and refer- ences therein). With respect to Kamchatka, westerly to north- westerly winds associated with the jet stream and the East Asian Trough form a source of continental air masses from Siberia to eastern Asia (Mock et al., 1998).
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Competitiveness of Romania’s South East Region in the European Context

Competitiveness of Romania’s South East Region in the European Context

on the other hand, less talented and smart teenagers remain in Romania because the integration of our country in the European Union and a new distribution of incomes create new perspectives for them in point of vocational and career orientation. In order to allure students our universities make quite a lot of compromises. And this fact has become most obvious starting with the academic school year 2000-2001. The phenomenon has repeated itself in the following years as well and it was quite clearly seen in the fact that private universities did not have enough candidates for the number of places released even if several entrance sessions were organized. In the end, the entrance examination was replaced by the final Baccalaureate grade. There were even some state universities that were confronted with this problem, but the deans of such universities had no problem reassigning the spare places. In order to control the learning quality and the permanent vocational training as well as possible, every European country has created – starting with 1990 – national authorities, agencies, quality evaluation and authorization committees to supervise learning. They have appeared as a response to the rapid evolution of learning systems which the ministries of education could no longer control. Minimum qualitative standards have been established at a European level, according to which specialists have to be trained. Those universities that will not take these requests into account will be dismissed from the educational market.
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Vegetation responses to interglacial warming in the Arctic: examples from Lake El’gygytgyn, Far East Russian Arctic

Vegetation responses to interglacial warming in the Arctic: examples from Lake El’gygytgyn, Far East Russian Arctic

Abstract. Preliminary analyses of Lake El’gygytgyn sed- iment indicate a wide range of ecosystem responses to warmer than present climates. While palynological work de- scribing all interglacial vegetation is ongoing, sufficient data exist to compare recent warm events (the postglacial ther- mal maximum, PGTM, and marine isotope stage, MIS5) with “super” interglaciations (MIS11, MIS31). Palynologi- cal assemblages associated with these climatic optima sug- gest two types of vegetation responses: one dominated by deciduous taxa (PGTM, MIS5) and the second by evergreen conifers (MIS11, MIS31). MIS11 forests show a similar- ity to modern Picea–Larix–Betula–Alnus forests of Siberia. While dark coniferous forest also characterizes MIS31, the pollen taxa show an affinity to the boreal forest of the lower Amur valley (southern Russian Far East). Despite vegeta- tion differences during these thermal maxima, all glacial– interglacial transitions are alike, being dominated by decid- uous woody taxa. Initially Betula shrub tundra established and was replaced by tundra with tree-sized shrubs (PGTM), Betula woodland (MIS5), or Betula–Larix (MIS11, MIS31) forest. The consistent occurrence of deciduous forest and/or high shrub tundra before the incidence of maximum warmth underscores the importance of this biome for modeling ef- forts. The El’gygytgyn data also suggest a possible elimina- tion or massive reduction of Arctic plant communities under extreme warm-earth scenarios.
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