science and industry

Top PDF science and industry:

Realization of Data Science in Small Industry Using DSMM

Realization of Data Science in Small Industry Using DSMM

This paper introduces the interesting capability factors i.e. Stature, Competence Rank, Assurance Level and the Dependence. These factors are used to distinguish between higher and lower capabilities of organizations, practicing below DSMM Level X. Thus provides more details about an organization than DSMM model. This way customer is more flexible and satisfied for selecting development organization, without being endured the depth of mechanics. Another important aspect of this approach is to design number of different classification models for different purposes. For a common person we can call Expertise or skills classification model of different organizations or Expertise Level of an organization. To help data science practitioners and leaders identify their existing gaps and direct future investment, we proposed a framework called the Realization of Data Science in Small Industry Using DSMM. The DSMM assesses how reliably and sustainably a data science team can deliver value for their organization. The model consists of four levels of maturity and is split along five dimensions that apply to all analytical organizations. By design, the model is not specific to any given industry.

5 Read more

Heat-not-Burn Tobacco Products: Tobacco Industry Claims No Substitute for Science

Heat-not-Burn Tobacco Products: Tobacco Industry Claims No Substitute for Science

dangerous than cigarettes. Thus, it is critical that regulation of new products is based on a dispassionate evaluation of the evidence base, not on industry statements or purported science. Accordingly, all new tobacco products, including HNB products, should be independently evaluated on their potential to entice tobacco nonusers, especially children and adolescents, and on health-related outcomes for current tobacco users, including health harms and conventional cigarette quit rates, before approving their use and marketing them to consumers. Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of disease and death in the United States. Until product approval and advertising are based on the results of independent evaluations, we cannot allow the tobacco industry to target cigarette smokers or the general public with misleading claims about the safety of HNB tobacco products. We cannot allow the tobacco industry, whose core strategy remains the sale of traditional cigarettes, to put their success above the lives of individuals and public health.

5 Read more

From the linear model to incremental innovation: Science and Industry in India

From the linear model to incremental innovation: Science and Industry in India

One of the features of the earlier period had been the growth of production capabilities in critical areas of technology within the public sector (Pillai, 1978; Dasgupta, 1981; Khanna, 1984; Mani, 1989; Ram, 1990). As in the private sector, the emphasis here had been on the acquisition of production expertise, sometimes to the detriment of technological expertise; however, in many cases the actual scale and complexity of the technology made in-house process knowledge imperative (Dhar, 1984; Dhar, 1985; Ghosh, 1986). In a few cases, this was developed to the stage of high grade R & D capability, of an order which posed a challenge to the original technology suppliers, allowing these firms to compete internationally. Here there was evidence of an integrated science-industry interface within the organisation, along the lines of established transnational corporations: these corporations embodied the fruition of the Indian conception of self reliance in industrial structure and self reliance in technology (cf. Nath and Misra, 1994). It was perhaps these examples that led the authors of the 1986 CSIR Review Committee, at the tail end of this period, to re-recognise that the natural location of fundamental research was in the universities (whose talents had been cannibalised in the efforts to staff the CSIR laboratories), while the natural home for R & D was within the corporate sector (India, 1986). CSIR could then have as its rightful role the arena of advanced research in the production sciences. Such a role would have provided scope for CSIR researchers to function as scientists (rather than technicians working to industrial priorities) providing the base for Indian industry’s transition to epochal areas of technology. However, the realities of the continuing corporate disinclination to engage with challenging areas of research, together with the imperatives facing a fiscally impaired state undergoing deregulation, pointed the Committee towards recommendations in quite mundane areas (Singh, 1986; Singh, 1987a; Valluri, 1989; Sandhya et al, 1990; Valluri, 1990).

19 Read more

A Review of Science and Engineering Curriculum Design for Testing, Inspection and Certification Industry

A Review of Science and Engineering Curriculum Design for Testing, Inspection and Certification Industry

Abstract: Testing, Inspection and Certification (TIC) is a method of providing services to companies operating across various industrial verticals for the purpose of improving productivity, efficiency, and manufacturing process for manufacturers to meet with globally recognized standards, regulations, and policies set by governments to improve the quality of a product. Testing and inspection have increased the efficiency and productivity of various automotive organizations by reducing the cost and time for delivery, managing and controlling supply chain at each manufacturing stage, improving aftermarket sales and distribution, increasing the safety, and reducing the impact on environment. TIC plays a vital role in guaranteeing quality and credibility when dealing with these global challenges. There are substantial increasing figures indicated that there was continuous growth of the TIC industry because of its important role in the daily life of the Hong Kong community and in external trade. Although there is no further detailed explanation of these professionals’ requirements, it acknowledges that technical knowledge and skills are essential to support the development of the TIC Industry to cope with the manpower demand. The major sources to supply the manpower or professionals should be the graduates in science and engineering disciplines in higher education institutes. Hence, there is a need to review the job competency required by the TIC stakeholders, the competency standards for TIC industry, the curriculum in higher education institutes in order to find out if there is skill mismatch in TIC. This paper studies four main areas: testing, inspection and certification industry, curriculum design, competency and employability skills. It is concluded that TIC may encourage ever more students to pursue science or engineering during their undergraduate study. However, the problems in skill mismatch and skill gaps are reflected by the TIC stakeholders. Hence, greater attention may need to be given to the readiness and the extent of the current science and engineering curricula in higher education of support for undergraduates entering the TIC industry by considering the job competency requirements for TIC.

5 Read more

Science and profit: Essays on the biotechnology industry

Science and profit: Essays on the biotechnology industry

Naturally, there are some difficulties with this interpretation. Clearly, co-authorship does not capture the entire range o f active knowledge exchange among scientists. Academic researchers and industry scientists often read each others’ work, correspond informally, listen to conference presentations, serve on professional committees together and so on, which all may serve as legitimate conduits for knowledge exchange. Further, co-authorship may also reflect a variety of things other than exchange of information and joint problem solving. It may be offered as a quid pro quo for supplying information or resources such as money or research materials (Cockbum and Henderson, 1996). It may also serve as a way to acknowledge intellectual debts and in the physical and biological sciences to list laboratory directors or other senior project leaders as authors on papers which they may have had very little involvement in writing (Murray, 2002). Notwithstanding these issues, this study proceeds on the assumption that co-authorships represent evidence of a significant investment on the part of the firm in developing connections to publicly funded “open science” research.

222 Read more

Selected science: an industry campaign to undermine an OSHA hexavalent chromium standard

Selected science: an industry campaign to undermine an OSHA hexavalent chromium standard

The industry also commissioned a study of the mortality experience of workers at four low- exposure chromium plants, but did not make the results available to OSHA in a timely manner, despite multiple agency requests for precisely these sorts of data. The commissioned study found a statistically significant elevation in lung cancer risk among Cr(VI)-exposed workers at levels far below the current standard. This finding changed when the multi-plant cohort was divided into two statistically underpowered components and then published separately. The findings of the first paper published have been used by the chromium industry to attempt to slow OSHA's standard setting process. The second paper was withheld from OSHA until it was accepted for publication in a scientific journal, after the rulemaking record had closed.

8 Read more

Quality Assurance and Quality Management in Pharmaceutical Science and Pharmaceutical Industry

Quality Assurance and Quality Management in Pharmaceutical Science and Pharmaceutical Industry

The World Health Organization defines Affection Ascendancy (QC) as “the accession of all procedures undertaken to ensure the character and abstention of a accurate pharmaceutical.”The purpose of QC is to ensure the assurance and ability of a accomplished biologic artefact afore it is appear to the public. Supporting affection systems charge to ascertain whether items such as raw materials, components, containers, labeling and packaging abort to accommodated above-mentioned specifications. The QC Department is amenable for administering this assignment as able-bodied as testing the accomplished artefact to ensure it meets authoritative requirements. For pharmaceuticals, Affection Ascendancy may absorb analytic procedures alignment from simple actuality screenings to circuitous pharmacopoeia monographs. biologic manufacturers of the accepted of articles actuality fabricated and sold, but QC abandoned cannot agreement that a aerial affection artefact will be consistently produced. Substantial accomplishment decay (time and abstracts as a aftereffect of action deviations) and post-market recalls are affirmation of this. A bigger access is bare as the FDA accede in their 2006 Guidance for Industry, Affection Systems Access to Biologic Current Good Accomplishment Practice Regulations stated,

6 Read more

Scope and Challenges in the Retail Industry : Application of Data Science

Scope and Challenges in the Retail Industry : Application of Data Science

 Establish normative behavior and leverage science to alert you to changes. – Ideally every organization needs to respond instantly to changes however it can be quite complex. So it is required to monitor changes in such a predictive fashion that the organization has time to prepare and respond. One of the challenges to 1:1 marketing is the lack of sophistication in the response that need to be provided based on a real time event. While these events are impactful in certain situations, many more start out as data anomalies before they develop into a trend that reaches statistical significance. Thus by monitoring changes over time it is possible to ensure that reactions are better aligned with the customers’ needs.

11 Read more

Contribution of science parks to a successful University Industry Cooperation

Contribution of science parks to a successful University Industry Cooperation

The science shop functioned as a mediator in that specific case and created a connection between company C and the student of the University of Twente. Hence, institutional proximity was present, because this mediation was conducted by an institution of the ecosystem science park. Second, due to the successful connection, cognitive proximity can also be found. Namely, through this mediation, two participatory actors with the same professional background and the same tacit knowledge. Third, geographical proximity, was as well as in the previous cases, also there, because of the fact that company C and the building of in which the student was located, were both on the campus of the University of Twente. Hence, the two stakeholders were spatial close with walking distance of twenty minutes maximum. Fourth, organizational proximity, which was first absent has been created, namely by the alignment of the different goals of company C and the student and both stakeholders were still able to benefit from the situation.

44 Read more

Ch 10: Apes in Captivity and Extractive Industry

Ch 10: Apes in Captivity and Extractive Industry

Both social attitudes and science influ- ence animal welfare. For example, strong public support can influence funding, policy, and even the practices of private companies. Laws and other policies on animal welfare are common, ranging from international agreements to codes in a specific city or town. Examples noted elsewhere in this chapter highlight how welfare policies inform which captive settings are permitted for apes, what minimum standards are in place where apes are captive, and which organizations or people are responsible for the care and wel- fare of apes in captivity. A vital consideration is that welfare laws and other legal protec- tions and practices vary widely. Whether governed by laws or by organizational pol- icies and procedures, welfare practices can range from the most basic protections aimed at preventing abuse and neglect to exem- plary standards that aim for comprehensive individual welfare.

28 Read more

A General Review on Recent Trends In “Food Sensory Science”

A General Review on Recent Trends In “Food Sensory Science”

Sensory science has advanced significantly since its inception in the early half of the 20th century. It is continuously evolving to meet the needs of the 21st-century and adapting to give better, quicker predictions of product success. It will continue to have a vital role in enabling companies to maintain a healthy food supply and to gain competitive advantage by launching new, more successful products in a highly competitive and innovative food industry.

8 Read more

International Journal In Management & Social Science – September 2014 Edition | IJMR

International Journal In Management & Social Science – September 2014 Edition | IJMR

Growing at an average rate of 12.5 percent, the Indian chemical industry offers a wide spectrum of opportunities for the investors both from India and the world. The significant market potential, coupled with the existing pool of human resources, and the comprehensive variety of resources in the country make its profitable destination in the new millennium. In the world production of chemicals, Indian industry stands at 12th position. The Indian Chemical Industry has come out of its protected market since liberalization. Although the maximum customs duty is 7.5 percent as a result of number of Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) signed recently the actual duty protection to the chemical industry is significantly lower.

16 Read more

Towards a European research area - Science, technology and innovation. Key figures 2007

Towards a European research area - Science, technology and innovation. Key figures 2007

However, when interpreting the results it should be borne in mind that each country has a unique economic structure. At the EU level services represented, in 2003, 72 % of total value added and their share is increasing, while the weight of manufacturing industry in the economy is shrinking and accounts now for less than one-fifth of total value added. Although the increasing importance of services is a general pattern com- mon to all European countries, in some Member States manu facturing still represents a very significant proportion of all economic activities (e.g. in the Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovakia, Ireland, Finland and Ger- many, where manufacturing activities accounted for 23-31% of total value added in 2003), while others are more dominated by service activities (e.g. Luxembourg, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Belgium and France, where services represented 74-83% of total value added in 2003). The high-tech component of manufacturing industry

116 Read more

Cotton-Textile Cluster as a Knowledge Base for Education, Science and Manufacturing Innovational Cooperation

Cotton-Textile Cluster as a Knowledge Base for Education, Science and Manufacturing Innovational Cooperation

For textile industry the raw materials are cultivated in places using drip irrigation, inside cluster territory there will be oil and at extraction factory, cotton stem processing companies established. Secondary products such as solvent cake and hull are to be primary ingredient of daily nutrition for 10 thousand horned cattle of complex. The additional nutrition for horned cattle is planned to be through hydroponics, the plans with high fertility grown not on ground but in humidity. System of milk and meat products producing will be created. The wastes from farms and manufacturing will be used as biogas – a source for heating of 21 hectare greenhouse (scheme 2).

5 Read more

Operating Experience of Country’s  Agricultural Science and  Technological Park

Operating Experience of Country’s Agricultural Science and Technological Park

All regions should be based on local resources and natural conditions, determine the key development area advantage of agricultural industrial chain, clear about the focus on the development of agricultural industry and development direction, and adjust measures to local conditions to the production base of scientific plan- ning and rational layout to optimize the allocation of resources, intensive coor- dination management and the organization’s set of standard production. In the process of agricultural development, the government-industry-university-research cooperation can seek common ground, build consensus and coordinate each other [6] [7]. The parties to the contract would take the interest as the link and the contract as constrain, and all parties are going to be concentric, synthetic, fellow, mutual cooperation, mutual benefit for promoting the agricultural science and technological park, the regional agriculture development and the new rural construction.

8 Read more

Research on the Construction of China's Science and Technology Innovation Service Platform Based on the Perspective of Collaborative Innovation

Research on the Construction of China's Science and Technology Innovation Service Platform Based on the Perspective of Collaborative Innovation

Establishing a sound information resource sharing mechanism is an important prerequisite and key for the science and technology innovation service platform to play its role. At present, Jiangxi Province has not established a mature information base of Industry-University-Research cooperation. There are many barriers to information sources when innovators carry out scientific and technological innovation activities. Due to insufficient information sharing and poor interaction, the stickiness of scientific research institutions and enterprises is insufficient and the phenomenon of "information isolated island" is formed, which largely restricts the ability of social scientific and technological innovation. Therefore, first of all, we should enhance the awareness of opening and sharing of scientific and technological resources, strengthen the exchange and cooperation between the platform and domestic and international scientific research institutions, adhere to the combination of "going out" and "introducing", promote enterprises to actively integrate into the global scientific and technological innovation network, and absorb and draw lessons from advanced technology and management experience at home and abroad [22]; Secondly, build a province's scientific and technological information and scientific equipment network database platform to provide open sharing services to the society. Strengthen information exchange and cooperation with enterprises, understand the trends of social demand timely, and promote the industrialization of scientific and technological achievements.

9 Read more

Teaching science doing science: analysis of secondary students’ perception of science teaching

Teaching science doing science: analysis of secondary students’ perception of science teaching

Nevertheless, 57.5% of the students reported enjoyed the way their science classes were taught. In the first categorization of responses, the primary findings reveal that investigative activities were seen as tools to help assimilate knowledge and that these activities gave rise to problem situations, organization of thoughts, and making and sharing arguments (communication), as expressed by student A regarding the importance of the investigative methodology to consolidate knowledge: "Perfect and always useful, helps to consolidate teaching.It’s a way of sharing knowledge”. However, for knowledge to be consolidated, teachers must stimulate their students to explore and express their opinions.In doing so, teachers stimulate them to want knowledge and pursueit. According to Moreira (1999), with this teaching attitude students assume the role of receivers of knowledge, that is, agents of their own learning, thereby developing autonomy. This learning autonomy was observed in student B’s statement: “Very interesting, students feel responsible and important as they conduct research and discover the world around them”. This shows that the teaching methodology means more than changing one set of theories for another; first and foremost, it means clearly determining what the theories consist of. In this respect, Driver et al., (1999) stated the following: Teaching science involves introducing children and adolescents to a different way of thinking about the natural world and explaining it; it means becomingfamiliar to a greater or lesser extent with the practices of the scientific community, its specific goals, way of seeing the world and how it supports the assertions of knowledge.Before this can occur, however, they must be engaged in a personal process of construction and attribution of meanings.Thus, learning science involves both personal and social processes. In the social context, it consists of being introduced to the concepts, symbols and conventions of the scientific community (DRIVER, 1999, p. 36).

5 Read more

Constructivism learning and formative assessment in science education

Constructivism learning and formative assessment in science education

Ketelhut et al. (2013) states that current science assessments usually produce a series of fact-based questions separately, not fully representing the complexity of science-building in the real world. This should be changed to a more authentic model of practice of science. Therefore, Ketelhut et al. (2013) suggests that good scientific assessments should consist of several key factors: integration of science content with scientific inquiries, questions in the form of constructs, grading efficiency and validity and statistical reliability. Gilbert et al. (2014) using the learning program through real / internship experience among university students. The intervention also provides the effect of active learning at a high level. Rivera Maulucci et al. (2014) explored the experience of six secondary school students in an authentic science inquiry program. The findings of Rivera Maulucci et al. (2014) suggests that an authentic science inquiry project is able to provide students with academic excellence, provide students the opportunity to acquire skills, have the potential to challenge students' knowledge of science, enhance student / student engagement with science, and improve student achievement in science.

5 Read more

Indian banking industry: Challenges and progress

Indian banking industry: Challenges and progress

Financial sector reforms and liberalization of prudential regulations or proclamations have thrown in a lot of opportunities for Indian bank to grow and diversify their areas of business operations. There is no doubt that deregulation has opened up new vistas for banks to augment revenues but it has entailed greater competition and consequently greater risks and a chain of challenges. These challenges emerged as a result of emergence of new banks, new financial institutions, new instruments and new opportunities in this modern business environment. Moreover, globalization has ushered in restructuring of the banking and financial sector through a series of mergers and amalgamations and eventually brought in convergence of different activities and businesses in the banking sector (Deshpandey, 2001). With globalization, newer technologies and techniques in areas like fund management and security creation has been introduced. Also innovative products which are tailor-made to meet the varied requirements of customers are introduced in the market to cater the needs of the customers in a better way. Thus, today, banks are subjected to cut-throat competition and in order to survive, Indian banks need to be proactive in meeting these emerging challenges. Moreover, competition has resulted in extending the frontiers of banking activities, which calls for understanding and upgradation of skills in various areas and more importantly in the area of risk management. Although the Indian banking industry is one of the best in Asia in terms of efficiency (Shen, Liao & Weyman-Jones, 2009), the industry has to go a long to compete with global banks. Therefore, the following are the areas on which banks need to focus for their sustenance:

8 Read more

Weird science and datafication

Weird science and datafication

Reading about the John Bargh priming controversy, including the ‘Hans the horse charge’, reminded me of another controversy within the scientific realm that took place at about the same time as Clever Hans was tapping his hoofs to solve math problems. In the late-nineteenth and very early-twentieth centuries, Eusapia Palladino, a medium from Naples, succeeded in shaking the belief system of some of Europe’s and the United States’ most prominent men and women of science. During her Naples séances, Palladino suspended tables in the air without any visible support and made curtains blow wildly in a room with all its windows and doors closed. These magnificent occurrences of mediated psychic phenomena were reported by, among others, the psychic researcher and scientific journalist Hereward Carrington in a McClure’s Magazine article from 1909 titled ‘Eusapia Palladino: The despair of science’ (Carrington, 1909). Carrington further claimed to have witnessed Palladino making the renowned Italian neurologist Enrico Morselli left-handed, even though he was normally right-handed, and to have felt a cold breeze coming from a scar on Palladino’s forehead. It is no wonder that a psychic researcher like Carrington was taken by Palladino’s séances and convinced about the reality of psychic phenomena, but it seems quite astounding that a medium from Naples was able to draw the interest of and ultimately win over some of the foremost scientists of the day.

15 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...