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Community Resilience to Climate Change : Outcomes of the Scottish Borders Climate Resilient Communities Project

Community Resilience to Climate Change : Outcomes of the Scottish Borders Climate Resilient Communities Project

There has been a long-term focus on partnership working between public bodies in the Scottish Borders. This has included partnership working between emergency services and the SBC to improve coordination for disaster response. More widely, community planning partnerships have been established to better coordinate collaboration to deliver improvements in communities, as set out under the Local Government in Scotland Act 2003 (Audit Scotland, 2013). This partnership involves numerous public bodies and is framed around key themes including: economic growth, maximising impact from the low carbon agenda and reducing inequalities (Scottish Borders Council, revised 2015). SBC has also made significant attempts to develop community resilience groups to support its emergency planning efforts. Through continued extensive engagement with communities, a number of local resilience groups have been established, with a particular focus on dealing with the direct impacts from extreme weather on communities, particularly flooding (Lyon, 2015). Furthermore, the Local Flood Management Plans that are being developed as a response to the Scottish Flood Risk Management Act (2009), identify community resilience groups as a key entry point for wider community engagement and action to achieve benefits beyond just enhancing responses to crises.
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Evaluation of the Scottish Borders Feuerstein Instrumental Enrichment (FIE) programme

Evaluation of the Scottish Borders Feuerstein Instrumental Enrichment (FIE) programme

In the light of decades of worldwide research that implies that the Feuerstein Instrumental Enrichment (FIE) programme has potential to enhance learning and attainment (Romney and Samuels, 2001) a pilot programme was launched in Scottish Borders Council schools in September 2005. Since the programme includes activities to help pupils to control impulsive behaviour, most pupils selected for the programme had a history of underachieving due to social, emotional or behavioural problems. The FIE programme is described in Section 1. There are two strands to the pilot project: one is equipping teachers to deliver the FIE programme to the most vulnerable pupils, the other is the adoption of the Feuerstein approach to mediating learning across schools. While the first strand is very resource intensive, the second strand can operate with more modest investment. In 2005-2006, 32 primary and secondary teachers, including members of school Senior Management Teams, volunteered for the Feuerstein accredited training and began to deliver the FIE programme with the selected pupils for around 80 minutes per week.
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The administration of the Scottish borders in the sixteenth century

The administration of the Scottish borders in the sixteenth century

Muster of groups meet at Dryburgh at Jedburgh from Redress given to.. James VI Maitland Angus Bellenden Alexander E&v.[r]

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A study of society in the Anglo Scottish borders, 1455 1502

A study of society in the Anglo Scottish borders, 1455 1502

ourviving evidence concerning border towns and the activities of their inhabitants in the later fifteenth century is extremely limited, and it is impossible to provide details of urban i[r]

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Early Years Assessment Team (Scottish Borders) : Evaluation Report

Early Years Assessment Team (Scottish Borders) : Evaluation Report

Since 2009 the team have received, on average, 170 referrals per year, which is 12% of the Borders births per year; all received support from the midwives and most (70%) some form of additional support from family support workers. Around a third of these cases led to a pre-birth planning meeting in order to ensure the appropriate package of support was in place prior to the birth of the child. The early intervention approach with families aims both to ensure that the family is adequately supported during pregnancy and that children get the best start in life. Around 20% of cases are ‘held’ by social workers in the Team; this includes those where there is concern about the parents’ ability to care for the child. In these cases, parenting ‘assessments’ 1 will be undertaken during the perinatal period (both ante- and post-natally). This process is
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‘Generation rent’ and the ability to ‘settle down’: economic and geographical variation in young people’s housing transitions

‘Generation rent’ and the ability to ‘settle down’: economic and geographical variation in young people’s housing transitions

Our data on young people is drawn from a sub-set of the sample from a large, UK-wide, mixed-methods project on housing wealth and inter-generational justice titled: Mind the (Housing) Wealth Gap, funded by the Leverhulme Trust. The data presented in this paper were derived from the Scottish case studies from one work-stream that focused on the qualitative experiences of young people aged 18-35, with a particular interest in how family support was perceived to shape their housing opportunities. This study used purposive sampling to recruit 25 young people from 3 case study sites in Scotland (Edinburgh, North Lanarkshire and the Scottish Borders). Young people were recruited through a variety of methods including: flyers and posters displayed in their local area; contact with ‘gatekeeper’ organisations (e.g. housing providers, citizen advice bureaux); posting links to our project website, on relevant Facebook pages and online message boards; and through the project Twitter feed. Snowball sampling was then used in order to draw on the networks and contacts of the initial wave of interviewees. All participants were provided with a written information sheet outlining what involvement in the study would entail, and written consent was secured.
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The administration of medicines in schools : report on FOI responses

The administration of medicines in schools : report on FOI responses

“The involvement of both NHS Borders and Scottish Borders Council reinforces the close liaison and support necessary for schools to deliver this important service and allows them to develop Individual Health Care Plans (IHCPs) appropriate to pupil needs.” (Scottish Borders) These examples show that most authorities – in line with the 2001 Guidance - saw the issuing of a health care plan as a useful mechanism to identify the levels and types of support required for the child or young person.

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The Anglo Scottish war of 1558 and the Scottish Reformation

The Anglo Scottish war of 1558 and the Scottish Reformation

spread beyond the borders. At its most dramatic, this envisaged plans to capture Berwick or fears that Edinburgh would be invaded. Whilst events on the Anglo-Scottish border, Ireland and the west coast of Scotland did not directly affect events on the Continent, they should be seen as part of this broader conflict. Even though this war was not as large in scale as, for instance, the Rough Wooings, it nonetheless occupied a significant portion of government resources and attention. Contemporary commentators on both sides of the confessional divide connected the rise in preaching to the war, and a need to placate valuable soldiers provides a plausible explanation for Guise’s refusal to proceed with heresy trials which, on at least one occasion, she had used crown officials to arrange. As Knox himself recognized, throughout 1558 ‘warr continewed, during the whiche the Evangell of Jesus Christ begane wondrously to floriss’. 149
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Evaluation of the impact of the implementation of Teaching
Scotland's Future

Evaluation of the impact of the implementation of Teaching Scotland's Future

2.4 The report identified Leadership as a key area for development, highlighting the increasing difficulty in recruiting head teachers that many education authorities were experiencing. Recommendations were made aimed at increasing the number and skills of leaders to meet the perceived shortage, and improve the quality of leadership. It recommended more opportunities for experienced head teachers to develop their leadership skills, and the establishment of a leadership college to improve leadership capacity at all levels within Scottish education. The review also suggested that teacher leadership skills should be developed from the outset of their careers within a distributed model of school leadership. 2.5 Changes to ITE were recommended so that future cohorts of teachers would be
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Gender, Inequality and Borders

Gender, Inequality and Borders

As the number of migrants and refugees increased, many states acted to keep out potential migrants. States have tightened visa requirements and limited the entry of migrants, but their efforts to exclude migrants extend well beyond the policies considered by Bauder. Border controls are being implemented distant from the geographical boundaries of nation states and deep within them (Heyman, 1999; Massey, 1999). Through international agreements, nation states are engaging in interdiction at ports of entry far from their borders, while intensifying enforcement of laws against undocumented migrants within their national territories. Many affluent nations such as Canada also try to reduce the number of refugee claimants by funding international aid organizations to serve displaced persons near their places of origin (Hyndman, 2000). The geography of the border is shifting with enforcement and interdiction taking on multiple forms at multiple locations (Heyman, 1999). With this geographical shift, the nature and impact of border controls extends far beyond the legal location of the border that Bauder emphasizes.
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Between World Borders:

Between World Borders:

experience with childhood madness, parents who cannot accept as normal their children’s performances of voice hearing, or stimming, are forced to come to the “concept of [child].. patho[r]

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Borders, Violence, Law

Borders, Violence, Law

49 I am referring to <violence of the borders> to the extent in which the legality that currently establishes and defines the borders plainly is breaking the Law, violating rights. Since, regarding the case of the EU at present day, as a consequence of the process of renationalisation of migration and asylum policies, the borders are a <war instrument against immigrants and refugees>, as it has been reported for some time now by the NGO Migreurop: a war in which the Law is the basic tool, which means the destruction of the Rule of Law and of the very thing that gives sense to Law itself, the fight for the rights.
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The1997 Scottish referendum : an analysis of the Scottish referendum

The1997 Scottish referendum : an analysis of the Scottish referendum

During the referendum campaign and, indeed, on referendum night itself, there was a good deal of journalistic speculation about the likely turnout in the referendum and about how the turnout should be interpreted. A low turnout, it was feared, would dent the legitimacy of the new parliament even if there were a 'Yes' majority. The unasked question in most discussions of turnout (both before and after the referendum), however, is what levels of turnout would count as 'low' (or 'satisfactory' or 'high'). Indeed, much of this comment revealed a rather sketchy knowledge of turnout levels and patterns of turnout variation in different kinds of elections. The national turnout in the referendum was 60.4%. This figure is put into context in table 1, which shows turnouts in Scotland at various kinds of elections and at the three referendums held so far. The turnout in 1997 was very close to those recorded in the two previous referendums. Indeed, the electoral register on which the 1997 figure is based was more than six months older than that used in 1979 and, when a standard adjustment is made to take account of deaths and electors who have moved since the compilation of the register, the turnouts in the two referendums were almost identical. Turnout at all three referendums was, of course, lower than in the last general election. But this reflects a general phenomenon. In all countries referendum turnouts tend to be lower than the turnout in parliamentary elections (Butler and Ranney 1994). This may be because the important cues of party loyalty to guide voters are frequently absent in referendums. On the other hand the referendum turnout was much greater than the Scottish turnout in local elections or in elections to the European parliament. Turnout in the referendum was, then, about as good as could have been expected.
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The expenditure impacts of individual higher education institutions and their students on the Scottish economy under a regional government budget constraint : homogeneity or heterogeneity?

The expenditure impacts of individual higher education institutions and their students on the Scottish economy under a regional government budget constraint : homogeneity or heterogeneity?

There have been a number of studies of expenditure impacts of Scottish HEIs. These include Blake and McDowell (1967), Brownrigg (1973), Battu, et al (1998), Kelly et al (2004), Hermannsson et al (2010a). The best of these have been input-output (IO) based (e.g. Kelly et al, 2004). We adopt such an IO approach but our analysis is distinctive in two important ways. First, we provide a comprehensive, systematic and consistent IO attribution analysis of the impact of each individual HEI, as well as the impact of the Scottish HEI sector as whole. This analysis highlights the heterogeneity of impacts across Scottish HEIs. Second, the source of this diversity is not variation in the pattern of expenditure for individual HEIs, which would be the conventional argument. Rather it stems from the difference in the sources of funding across Scottish HEIs.
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Beyond the revolving court door : is it time for problem-solving courts?

Beyond the revolving court door : is it time for problem-solving courts?

IS IT TIME for a radical re-think in the way in which the justice system deals with offenders? Are there better and more constructive ways of dealing with the problem of offending at its roots, or are we stuck with a revolving door of reoffending? The 2012 Angiolini Report of the Commission on Women Offenders (see article on page 3 of this issue) recommended a pilot ‘Problem-Solving Court’ (PSC) for “repeat offenders with multiple and complex needs who commit lower level crimes.” That recommendation, accepted by the Scottish Government, was followed by the visit of three senior PSC judges from the USA who gave a public lecture at Strathclyde University and had discussions with the Justice Secretary, senior officials, members of the judiciary and others.
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Postcards across borders

Postcards across borders

For preliminary and post project interviews, data were analysed using open or emergent coding, where concepts were identified, applied to further text, and refined to produce emergent themes. According to Kumar (2005), this process involves reading through interview responses to gain understanding of their meaning and, “from these responses you develop broad themes that reflect these meanings…these themes become the basis for analysing the text” (pp. 240 - 241). As the researchers recognise the subjectivity that arises from this method, and to ensure that analysis of the data was not affected by the relationships each researcher had established with their primary school students, the Scotland interviews were analysed by the Australian researcher and the Australia interviews by the Scottish researcher. These were later cross-checked and any discrepancies discussed and re-examined. The postcards themselves, though not the main focus of this paper, were analysed using content and interpretive analysis. Content analysis meant identifying and counting items within the image, and interpretive analysis meant researchers reflecting on the overall mood of the drawing, emerging themes, unusual features and intuitive responses to the drawing (see Tables 2 – 11).
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The future of local unemployment statistics : the case for replacing TTWAs

The future of local unemployment statistics : the case for replacing TTWAs

FIGURE 1 = Distribution of Scottish TTWAs by size of workforce FIGURE 2 = Unemployment rates for Scottish TTWAs, April 1991 FIGURE 3 = Census unemployment rates for Scottish local author[r]

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Was Germany ever united? Evidence from intra  and international trade 1885–1933

Was Germany ever united? Evidence from intra and international trade 1885–1933

border-related trade costs from a gravity model. 8 But their origins and dynamics over time are not well understood. We still do not know why borders continue to matter in periods of increasing economic integration. Even in the careful specification of Anderson and van Wincoop (2003) the US-Canadian border is estimated to have reduced cross-border trade by roughly 40% in 1993, four years after the free-trade agreement. Moreover, recent studies on the cases of Poland’s (1918) and Germany’s (1990) political re-unifications indicate that the old borders that once divided these countries continued to have a quite large effect on trade even 15-20 years after unification. 9 It is thus not surprising that borders matter for trade, but it is startling that they matter so much and that their effects persist so long. That is puzzling to economists, who typically model “borders” in terms of tariffs, currency areas or similar economic barriers. The empirical evidence so far suggests that these factors fail to capture how borders matter for trade and this paper explores the dynamics of border effects over time – in particular how the dramatic changes in Germany’s external borders affected trade flows within and across these borders. The fundamental question is when did the external border of Germany start to matter? But in order to answer this question, we must take other causes of fragmentation into account that may have also affected trade flows.
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Sustainable development in Scotland : a review of progress by the Scottish Executive

Sustainable development in Scotland : a review of progress by the Scottish Executive

More generally, the extent to which the concept of wellbeing is becoming integrated into policy and strategy is variable. Promoting wellbeing is a key theme in the Scottish Forestry Strategy (2006). Organisations such as BTCV, Forward Scotland, Greenspace Scotland and Keep Scotland Beautiful are using the broad-based approach of Choosing Our Future to support and underpin their activities. Elsewhere, some local authorities and Community Planning Partnerships (CPPs) are delivering good work in this area including the development of joint health improvement plans involving a number of partners. The performance of CPPs on this agenda is however mixed.
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Tumour Associated Tissue Eosinophilia as a Prognostic Indicator in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Upper Aerodigestive Tract

Tumour Associated Tissue Eosinophilia as a Prognostic Indicator in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Upper Aerodigestive Tract

In our study 23 cases were having well differentiated SCC, 32 were having moderately differentiated SCC and 3 cases were having poorly differentiated SCC. All 23 cases with well differentiated SCC were having pushing borders, 2 were having grade I TATE, 6 were having grade II TATE and 15 were having grade III TATE. All 32 cases with moderately differentiated SCC were having pushing borders, 5 were having grade I TATE, 22 were having grade II TATE and 5 were having grade III TATE. All 3 cases with poorly differentiated SCC were having non pushing borders and grade I TATE (Table 3).
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