Seamus Heaney and his poetry

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An Analytical Study of Catholic Sufferings in the Poetry of Seamus Heaney

An Analytical Study of Catholic Sufferings in the Poetry of Seamus Heaney

So is the case with the Irish Nobel Laureate poet, Seamus Heaney (1939 - 2013) when he exposes the extreme agony of the Irish people being the part of that complete scenario. The poetry of Seamus Heaney places and projects the catholic sufferings as a part of the universal sufferings under social maladjustments. In this manner he saves himself from being a political stunt. His miserable pictures of the life of the Northern Irish population are so impressive and effective that even the hearts of those who inflicted sufferings and perpetrated pain are moved to the hilt. He has painted and presented the sufferings of the Catholics as the sufferings of the common man. Many of his poems from the poetic collections like Death of Naturalist, Door into the Dark, Wintering Out, North etc. are full of Catholic agonies. He presents the picture of the Catholic past and present, and exposes the true Irish identity. We do not find a poet who can claim that he is isolated from his surroundings. Every poet encodes his poetic ideas from those interior chamber and inner wards of his memory, where certain experiences earned through perceptions are stored. Even the greatest poets like William Shakespeare, William Wordsworth, etc. were not free from those influences which figured around them. Different enough, in
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Language and Landscape—Dinnshenchas in Seamus Heaney’s Poetry

Language and Landscape—Dinnshenchas in Seamus Heaney’s Poetry

tinction. Facing such situation, instead of exaggerating the superiority of Gaelic and unilateral culture system, Seamus Heaney has created place-names to explore the connotation of the language, to present landscape, forming an open and diverse space. As he has remarked: “In any movement towards liberation, it will be neces- sary to deny the normative authority of the dominant language or literary tradition… Neither MacDonagh nor Joyce considered it necessary to proscribe within his reader’s memory the riches of the Anglophone culture whose authority each was, in his own way, compelled to challenge. Neither denied his susceptibility to the to- tally persuasive word in order to prove the purity of his resistance to an imperial hegemony. Which is why both these figures are instructive when we come to consider the scope and function of poetry in the world. They re- mind us that its integrity is not to be impugned just because at any given moment it happens to be a refraction of some discredited cultural or political system. Poetry, let us say, whether it belongs to an old political dispensa- tion or aspires to express a new one, has to be a working model of inclusive consciousness. It should not simpli- fy. Its projections and inventions should be a match for the complex reality which surrounds it and out of which it is generated” (Heaney, 1995: p. 8). Openness and diversity can conform to the cultural context of Northern Ireland. With the coexistence of many ethnics, diverse religions as well as varied religious groups in Northern Ireland, the fierce conflicts have been accompanied by the combination of different cultures. Despite Irish cul- ture has remained its tradition and traits, it is not isolated and confined to itself. It has become a part of ancient European culture under the influence of Anglo-Saxon culture and the integration of cultures. Therefore, the lan- guage and landscape presented in Heaney’s place-name poetry are the true portrayal of Irish people’s language condition and life experience. In the poetry, Heaney has presented broad and diverse understanding of Irish identity by exploring the spirit of language as well as the landscape outside.
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The Rack-Brain Pencil-Push of hurt-in-hiding: Translating the Poetry of Seamus Heaney into Slovene

The Rack-Brain Pencil-Push of hurt-in-hiding: Translating the Poetry of Seamus Heaney into Slovene

With Death of a Naturalist, Heaney introduced himself as a poet “of rural Irish origins, writing of matters deeply rooted in Irish experience” (O’Donoghue 1994, 35) with an unquenching thirst for his ancestral sod and a directness articulated through a sharp eye for its particulars. The central features in this collection, as they bear on language and which every translator should bear in mind, are first a primitivism of subject and object; second, “there is a striking recurrence”, as observed by Bernard O’Donoghue, “of a contrast between hard and soft materials and surfaces which the language used reflects ..., a contrast between hard, consonantal English and soft, vocalic Irish ...” (ibid., 47). This seems to be perfectly in tune with the poet’s popular phrases “phonetics and feeling”, and “phonetic fantasy” − “the inextricability of sound and meaning” (ibid., 129). And third, there is Heaney's immaculate verbal representation of manual labour, with a meticulous sense of the smallest detail down to the last grain of wheat. Heaney, admittedly, is like a farmer who will never say: “From here to that tree over there”, but rather, “from here to that hornbeam, copper beach, birch…”. I propose, on this score, to take a look at a central poem from this collection, ‘Follower’, and juxtapose it with two separate Slovene translations. I have highlighted a few constitutive and/or translation-wise problematic expressions and phrases.
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"The boundaries of the land": Sectarian Division and the Politicization of Space in the Poetry of Seamus Heaney

"The boundaries of the land": Sectarian Division and the Politicization of Space in the Poetry of Seamus Heaney

While to some degree Heaney himself may look to this violent history in an attempt to explain the more recent sectarian violence in Ulster-in the bog poems, for example- his work also re[r]

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Tyranny and redress: The poetry of Robert Lowell, Geoffrey Hill and Seamus Heaney

Tyranny and redress: The poetry of Robert Lowell, Geoffrey Hill and Seamus Heaney

Zeus had to make nothing of me, so that he himself could be everything. That's the law and disease of tyrants - they are more sensitive than we are ... If a friend makes a slip, they see a traitor. But is Zeus a tyrant? I'm not sure. He cut through things at first. Each god was given his place and function; no more overlapping offices. He was, and still is, I think, a good enough god for the gods. Man was what troubled him. [...] I have been punished. I thought I could move the world. Now the world moves, I stand here, another obstruction, another dark spot in the merciless perfection of Zeus. (PB, p. 10)
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Seamus Heaney: Divisions and Allegiances

Seamus Heaney: Divisions and Allegiances

He feels the need to justify what he does, in particular the writing offree, lyric poetry, at a time and in a place where people suffer and are not free.. He demonstrates that he does no[r]

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An Analysis of Holdings of Selected Works of Seamus Heaney from 1965 to 1995 in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hills Rare Book Collection

An Analysis of Holdings of Selected Works of Seamus Heaney from 1965 to 1995 in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hills Rare Book Collection

In the next few years Heaney would see both success and loss. Haw Lantern (1987) received the 1987 Whitbread poetry prize; his second prose collections Government of the Tongue (1988) was published; and in 1988 he was elected the Professor of Poetry at Oxford University. This would also be a period of mourning as Heaney lost both his parents. His mother died in 1984 followed by his father shortly after in 1986. In Haw Lantern (1987) the sequence of sonnets entitled “Clearances” is written in memory of his mother, and “The Stone Verdict” commemorates his father. In this volume as well as in Seeing Things (1991), there is also a new “freeing up” that occurs in his poetry that Michael Parker attributes to this grief (211).
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Ecocritical Readings of Ted Hughes, Seamus Heaney and Dylan Thomas

Ecocritical Readings of Ted Hughes, Seamus Heaney and Dylan Thomas

thought is carried over in the collection of poems, entitled In Country Heaven. Thomas argues contemporary poetry cannot be a celebration of nature but an elegy for the loss of a presence that used to be. But he is not that pessimistic; the fact that the process of life and nature never fails, that the seasonal changes with time are themselves beneficent are beautifully expressed in „Especially When the October Wind‟. This idea is anticipated in „Poem in October‟; various aspects of nature such as birds, trees, weather, sun and sea have been engaged to explore the poet‟s inner life and language here becomes the vital mode for conveying that experience. Thomas‟s awareness about the relationship between his own physical body and the process of nature is explored vividly in 18 Poems. This is an identification of man and the universe where nature becomes his elemental origin and his destiny too: when alive blood moves like the ocean in him; at death flesh becomes the earth. 10 His poetry thus brings the British landscape vividly to life but is also enhanced by his humane concerns. He therefore goes beyond the simple pastoral because he is able to project onto nature some innately human fears and concerns and intertwines the flow of nature‟s year with these pressing problems of human life – such as change, decay, reproduction and death. 11
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Place and displacement in the works of Brian Friel and Seamus Heaney

Place and displacement in the works of Brian Friel and Seamus Heaney

Secondary Son rces: Irish Writing Books Andrews, Elmer, ed., Contemporary Irish Poetry Basingstoke, 1992 Brown, Terence, Irish Literature: Selected Essays Mullingar, Westmeath, 1988 Cair[r]

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Seamus Heaney Overview.doc

Seamus Heaney Overview.doc

‘He is proposing an idea of poetry which combines 3. psychic investigation with historical enquiry’ (Elmer Andrews) (see ‘Bogland’, ‘The Tollund Man’). In the essay ‘Feeling into Words’, Heaney himself spoke of ‘poetry as divination, poetry as revelation of the self to the self, as restoration of the culture to itself; poems as elements of continuity, with the aura and authenticity of archaeological finds, where the buried shard has an importance that is not diminished by the importance of the buried city; poetry as a dig, a dig for finds that end up being plants’ (Preoccupations, 1980).
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Contributor Notes

Contributor Notes

Richard Shelton's first non-fiction book, Going Back To Bisbee (Univer- sity of Arizona Press) won the Western States Award for creative nonfiction in 1992. It is currently in its 4th printing. Many of his prose poems are collected in Selected Poems: 1969-1981 (University of Pittsburgh Press).

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The Linguistic Technique of Parallelism in  Al-Ahwas Al-Ansari’s Poetry: A Stylistic Study

The Linguistic Technique of Parallelism in Al-Ahwas Al-Ansari’s Poetry: A Stylistic Study

main stylistic techniques has the ability to produce an aesthetic text on one hand, and demonstrates significance on the other hand. It plays effective roles in drawing the recipient's attention, which really has an excellent rhythmic musicality, as well as myriad facets of rhythmic alliteration, repetition, and vocal synonymy. These repetitions contributed to the creation of musical tones resulting from the interaction between sounds and meanings in the text. It is evident that the results of this study lends support to Parry’s (2007) findings in that presenting a panoply of parallelisms in the poetry can fulfill certain functions. It gives a general sense of contentment to the reader, proving that the text is more comprehensible, more beautiful, and more expressive. It also helps draw readers’ attention to details in the text which enhances the possibility that elucidations will be verifiable in the text itself and not just in the eye of the readers. Besides, parallelistic analyses display the orderliness and complexity of the text, proving that the text is not chaotic or devoid of form. Parallelistic features could further help readers divide the text into its originally intended segments or units, and link counterparts in the text properly to each other, thus they give evidence of the stylistic preferences of individual authors. The findings are also in line with Al-Subhi’s (2009) who asserted that these patterns of parallelism create unexpected effects upon readers to varying techniques showing the regularities of sounds, words, and structures that characterize the style of poets. The findings also confirm Al-Zebadi’s (2007) finding that parallelism is one of the most vital devices of poetic language that plays a crucial role in conveying the poet’s message. They are consistent with Al-Saamady’s (2001) and Khourany’s (2007) outcomes that parallelism enriches the denotation, deepens the meaning, increases the connotative space of the text, the denotative and aesthetic energies and the textual effects. The study also ratifies Aziz (2012)’s conclusion that parallelism can be used as syntactic and semantic interconnection and unity device that binds the elements of a text together to create a complete meaning and support the power of persuasion.
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Ornateness in the Poetry of Nissim Ezekiel

Ornateness in the Poetry of Nissim Ezekiel

The above said lines are very true in case of Nissim Ezekiel. Apart from these, what Ezra Pound said about the fundamental aspects of images, Ezekiel too some extent follows all these. He uses common speech and exact word to show images. He also uses free verse to give freedom and individuality in his poems and he never copied old rhymes. Regarding his choice of subject, he shoes absolute freedom and he presents images to avoid vague generalities. His images are clear and free of blurred and infinite thoughts. In this connection it can be said that what C.Day Lewis said about imagery goes perfectly with Ezekiel: “An epithet, a metaphor, a simile may create an image, or an image may be presented to us in a phrase or a passage on the face of it purely descriptive, but conveying to our imagination something more than the accurate reflection of an external reality.” (Lewis,4)
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What is Heaney Seeing in Seeing Things?

What is Heaney Seeing in Seeing Things?

Although some critics felt Heaney was not working at the top of his form in Seeing Things, the poems have a strong, cumulative effect. Like many modernist poems, and like the modernist s[r]

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An Analysis of Jack Mapanje’s Poetry with Particular Reference to his use of Obscuring Devices

An Analysis of Jack Mapanje’s Poetry with Particular Reference to his use of Obscuring Devices

Although this is somehow acceptable as a literary posi- tion of an artist to the Censorship Board, those who know Mapanje well are aware that he is simply pulling the wool over the eyes of the Board by ‘adopting’ such, for the Board’s convenience, a purely literary position as expected of any poet. Privately, however, Mapanje admits to his friends that his stated position is a deliberately chosen one. Mapanje (1986:18) in an article titled “The Chameleon in Love, Life and Literacy – The Poetry of Jack Mapanje”, which he then later titled Of Chameleons and Gods he confesses he is being advisedly ‘cryptic’ in his poetry since he is writing about sit- uations which force him to adopt such a style. The choice of title and style are significant in that Mapanje’s poetry can be claimed to be as illusive as the animal that is their trademark. He takes precautions by being obscure in his poetry, obscure not to make meaning inaccessible, but meaning is hidden so it can be decoded. His intended readership would be able to decode his poetry and get to the real meaning the poet tries to convey. A selection of Mapanje’s poems will now be ana- lyzed in an attempt to “decode” them.
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"The World is...A Kind of Spiritual Kindergarten"

"The World is...A Kind of Spiritual Kindergarten"

Robinson maintained his psychological method and content in all his poetry; his "studies" are as much a touchstone of his work as is James's "point of view." He sustained[r]

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Thematic Concept in Select Poems of Robin Singh Ngangom

Thematic Concept in Select Poems of Robin Singh Ngangom

As the days ‘crumble’, the volume of ‘victors and their victims’ keeps increasing (6-7). Keeping with the poet’s unspecified solemn intent, the speaker ‘hardens’ within his ‘thickening hide’ and purges off his shaky and fragile humanitarian feelings to move beyond his weak, thin- skinned self (8-9), which he calls his ‘uneasy manhood’ (24). There is no better way of attaining this than by arresting soul-stirring thoughts – blocking reflections about ‘abandoned children inside blazing huts/ still waiting for their parents’ (11-12) and of women in their late pregnancy ‘mown down’ like ‘grain stalk’ (18-19). One is left with questions: if those children could reminisce when dying, the pleasure of having listened to their ‘grandmother’s tales’ (13); or, if those would-be mothers had been waiting for their men with ‘wildflowers in their hair’ (20). These are unanswered. The poet doesn’t break down with them but he burns the ‘truth with them’ (23) and moves on in life.
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Spontaneity and the Creative Impulse

Spontaneity and the Creative Impulse

People who use conscious art on poetry, play with its spontaneous nature, and those who try to reduce it to fixed jars of iambic pentameter, or heroic couplet etc. and spend days and nights on making the lines rhyme, work less like poets and more like lab technicians. Creative impulse gets sabotaged as soon as the feeling for the form clicks in while the process of reception of ideas and emotions is on. Once disturbed, the poet’s mind cannot be returned to those thoughts which had generated those feelings in that particular moment.
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Two forgotten poems by John Tyndall (1841)

Two forgotten poems by John Tyndall (1841)

a man who is re-visiting the home he left long time ago, which is obviously self-referential, and two local characters; these are not, as the title would suggest, a landlord and his tenant, but rather, a lucky tenant and an unlucky one, as both refer to their landlord in dramatically different ways. Although their religion is not explicitly stated, one, happy and industrious, is the Protes- tant tenant. He is not free from natural disaster such as weather and blight, but he is able to fight them, or at least, he is con- tented with his lot, his home having stood for generations. “God bless my Landlord” are his parting words. The other, wretched, would appear to be the Catholic tenant, now homeless, the home where he spent a happy childhood and where his father died, and where “I might have spent a happy life” destroyed, through the landlord’s deceit, “A wretched houseless wanderer I roam” is the summary of his statement, but not without sug- gesting that in this case, these were “imaginary wrongs.” Tyn- dall does not make a moral judgement between the two, as to whether one was good and the other wasn’t. It was his unique experience having lived and having befriended real people on both camps, so he simply acknowledged their different forms of existence; the first, not blaming God, the second, putting the blame for all his sorrows at the gate of the landlord.
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Full Article

Full Article

As a historical sidenote, the citizens of Florence had seized the opportunity afforded by the turmoil following the sack of Rome in 1527 to establish a republic. Michelangelo returned from exile to design fortifications to defend the city against the attempts of Clement and Emperor Charles V to reclaim it, which they eventually did following a lengthy siege. Clement then installed Ippolito’s half- brother Alessandro as duke and created Ippolito a cardinal, quickly dispatching him as a legate in order to remove the possibility of his becoming a competing influence. Unchallenged and unchecked, Alessandro turned cruel in his oppression of the liberal Florentine populace and the free expression of its arts and ideals. In her attempts to convince Vittoria that her love for Ippolito is justified, notwithstanding his divine vocation, Giulia explains that in addition to his being a “poet, a musician, and a scholar,”
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