Sleep intervention

Top PDF Sleep intervention:

Behavioral Sleep Intervention for Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder: a Pilot Study

Behavioral Sleep Intervention for Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder: a Pilot Study

Most existing sleep-intervention research with typically developing adolescents involves the young person as the primary change agent. Specifically, involving young people in the sleep intervention increases their knowledge of sleep-conducive behavior and teaches them skills to resolve their own sleep disturbance (Schlarb, Liddle, & Hautzinger, 2011). A review of the autism and sleep literature revealed that only one study has actively included adolescents with ASD in the therapeutic process. Loring et al. (2016) provided two sleep- education sessions to 18 adolescents (11 to 18 years old) with high-functioning autism (HFA, IQ >70) and their parents. Session one targeted sleep hygiene including bedtime routine and arranging the sleep environment, and session two taught relaxation and distraction techniques to facilitate sleep onset. Subsequent application of these practices by the adolescents, with parental support, resulted in significant improvements in sleep onset and efficiency. In other studies, young people with ASD have been engaged in the sleep-intervention process through social stories and visual schedules (e.g., Delemere &Dounavi, 2018; Moore, 2004). However, in those cases, parents were the primary intervention agent.
Show more

30 Read more

Examining the efficacy of a multicomponent m-Health physical activity, diet and sleep intervention for weight loss in overweight and obese adults: randomised controlled trial protocol

Examining the efficacy of a multicomponent m-Health physical activity, diet and sleep intervention for weight loss in overweight and obese adults: randomised controlled trial protocol

Methods and analysis The primary aim of this three- arm randomised controlled trial is to examine the efficacy of a multicomponent m-Health behaviour change weight loss intervention relative to a waitlist control group. The secondary aims are to compare the relative efficacy of a physical activity, dietary behaviour and sleep intervention (enhanced intervention), compared with a physical activity and dietary behaviour only intervention (traditional intervention), on the primary outcome of weight loss and secondary outcomes of waist circumference, glycated haemoglobin, physical activity, diet quality and intake, sleep health, eating behaviours, depression, anxiety and stress and quality of life. Assessments will be conducted at baseline, 6 months (primary endpoint) and 12 months (follow-up). The multicomponent m-Health intervention will be delivered using a smartphone/tablet ‘app’, supplemented with email and SMS and individualised in-person dietary counselling. Participants will receive a Fitbit, body weight scales to facilitate self-monitoring, and use the app to access educational material, set goals, self-monitor and receive feedback about behaviours. Generalised linear models using an analysis of covariance (baseline adjusted) approach will be used to identify between-group differences in primary and secondary outcomes, following an intention-to-treat principle. Ethics and dissemination The Human Research Ethics Committee of The University of Newcastle Australia
Show more

14 Read more

A Sleep Intervention for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Pilot Study

A Sleep Intervention for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Pilot Study

Given the association between sleep problems, greater behavioral difficulties, and parental stress, there is a need for effective sleep intervention programs for this population. Recent systematic reviews of behavioral intervention for sleep problems in children with ASD concluded that the evidence for effective treatments is sparse (Turner & Johnson, 2013; Vriend et al., 2011). While there is an emerging evidence base and a wide variety of treatments, identifying appropriate interventions is imperative for this population. Behavioral methods have some reported success but these approaches can be time consuming (Reed et al., 2009; Weiss & Salpekar, 2010).
Show more

13 Read more

Effectiveness of  Sleep Intervention strategies on Sleep Quality and Daytime Sleepiness among the Elderly

Effectiveness of Sleep Intervention strategies on Sleep Quality and Daytime Sleepiness among the Elderly

No matter what the age is, sleeping well is essential for physical health and emotional wellbeing. For the elderly good night sleep is especially important because it helps improve concentration and memory formation, allows the body to repair any cell damage that occurred during the day and refreshes the immune system which in turn helps to prevent disease. So the present study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of sleep intervention statergies on sleep quality and daytime sleepiness of the elderly people residing in oldage homes.Quasi experimental design with non equivalent pretest and posttest control group design was adopted for this study.Samples were the elderly people in the age group of 60 – 80 years who fit the inclusion criteria. Samples size was 60. Tools used were Epworth Daytime Sleepiness scale to assess the daytime sleepiness and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality to assess the sleep quality of the elderly. The sleep intervention strategies which included were structured teaching program on sleep hygiene, aerobic exercises and aromatherapy were administered for 5 weeks to the experimental group. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used and the study findings were as follows:
Show more

116 Read more

Relationships between parental sleep quality, fatigue, cognitions about infant sleep, and parental depression pre and post intervention for infant behavioral sleep problems

Relationships between parental sleep quality, fatigue, cognitions about infant sleep, and parental depression pre and post intervention for infant behavioral sleep problems

It is a limitation that parents were exposed to different forms of the intervention (face-to-face as opposed to writ- ten materials) at different time points. The control group received intervention materials 6 weeks later than the inter- vention group, which could influence the utility of the intervention. Other researchers have reported that compar- isons of face-to-face treatment and exposure to written ma- terials revealed no differences in efficacy post-intervention [45, 46]. When we compared intervention and control groups at follow-up, there were no significant differences on any of the measures except for parents’ perceptions of the severity of the infant sleep problem of none-mild (96.3% intervention versus 86% control, p < .001, 95% CI 2.8%–17.8%) and a significant improvement in intervention group fathers ’ sleep doubt ( F (1,171) = 5.6, p = 0.02) and comfort with sleep and feeding ( F (1,171) = 8.8, p = 0.004) compared with the control group. It may be possible that fewer fathers in the control group were exposed to the sleep intervention through reading the written material.
Show more

10 Read more

Sleep hygiene intervention for youth aged 10 to 18 years with problematic sleep: a before-after pilot study

Sleep hygiene intervention for youth aged 10 to 18 years with problematic sleep: a before-after pilot study

circadian rhythm during puberty [8], delayed sleep phase syndrome (estimated to occur in 7% of adolescents) [9], and sleep disordered breathing (SDB) such as obstruct- ive sleep apnoea (OSA) [9,10]. However, insomnia type symptoms, such as difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, seem to be the most prevalent cause of inad- equate sleep with studies estimating insomnia type symptoms affecting up to 34% of adolescents [11,12]. Ex- trinsic factors, on the other hand, such as early school start times [13] and sleep habits (also known as sleep hy- giene) such as caffeine consumption [14,15] and the use of electronic devices [16-18] near bedtime have also been shown to adversely impinge on adolescent sleep time. Indeed, numerous studies have shown good sleep hygiene to be an important predictor of sleep quality in adolescents [19-22]. As such, sleep hygiene has been used to try and alleviate the sleep problems found in adolescents today. For example, a behavioural sleep programme, incorporating sleep hygiene and stimulus control instructions was developed and trialled in Uni- versity students in a bid to improve sleep quality [20]. A similar study also looked at the effectiveness of a school- based intervention in increasing sleep knowledge and improving adolescent sleep problems in high school students [23]. More interestingly, a behavioural sleep intervention utilizing a combination of sleep hygiene, cognitive therapy and stress reduction techniques has also been used as a means for improving sleep in the hope of lowering the risk for recidivism of substance abuse in adolescent substance users [24]. These sleep hy- giene studies have reported positive outcomes in various aspects of sleep quality [20,23,24] and even drug use at 12 months follow-up [24]. However, these studies have focussed on older aged adolescents and were delivered in a group or classroom setting. We have taken a differ- ent approach and developed a one-on-one sleep hygiene programme designed specifically for children and adoles- cents aged 10–18 years old. To the best of our know- ledge, this sleep programme is the first of its kind to be developed for youth in consultation with children and adolescents themselves. The current study thus aimed to examine the changes following a novel sleep hygiene intervention on sleep hygiene, sleep quality, and daytime symptoms in children and adolescents. As a secondary outcome, the study also measured changes in BMI be- cause of reported associations between inadequate sleep, disturbed sleep and overweight and obesity in children and adolescents [10,25].
Show more

9 Read more

A randomized controlled trial of an intervention for infants’ behavioral sleep problems

A randomized controlled trial of an intervention for infants’ behavioral sleep problems

Our intervention aimed to improve a BSP at an age when infants are developmentally capable of sustaining a long self-regulated sleep period for, on average, 10 h [20]. We sought to change families’ cognitions and be- haviors to promote infant self-soothing and targeted our intervention to both parents because both have affected infant sleep [21]. Parental cognitions are defined as be- liefs, expectations, and interpretations of children’s sleep behavior which are viewed as influencing parent-infant interactions and infant sleep patterns [22, 23]. Because public health nurses frequently encounter families ex- periencing infant BSP we trained them to deliver the sleep intervention. Nurses also delivered the safety con- trol sessions. The principal investigator created the ma- terials for the teaching sessions and phone calls. Total treatment duration was 3 weeks: one 2-h teaching ses- sion followed by bi-weekly telephone calls for 2 weeks. The nurses who delivered the teaching sessions called the parent leading the intervention/control twice a week for 2 weeks to reinforce concepts and provide support. The intervention and control groups were asked the same questions during the telephone calls: How were parents managing; what strategies were they using; what were the effects of their strategies on their infants and the parents; and what, if any, difficulties were they experiencing?
Show more

12 Read more

Impact of a delirium prevention project among older hospitalized patients who underwent orthopedic surgery: a retrospective cohort study

Impact of a delirium prevention project among older hospitalized patients who underwent orthopedic surgery: a retrospective cohort study

The third component of the project involved the use of an interdisciplinary preventive approach. Nurses provided a mini handbook on POD to patients and their caregivers who had been identified via screening to be at risk of POD. A pharmacist and a group of geriatricians defined a list of 15 medications (chlorpheniramine, diphenhydramine, hy- droxyzine, amitriptyline, scopolamine, alprazolam, clonaze- pam, diazepam, etizolam, lorazepam, triazolam, zolpidem, pethidine, famotidine, and ranitidine) that were reported to potentially cause delirium based on a review of previous studies and the frequency of use of these medications [17, 18]. To make a list of inappropriate medications for the eld- erly, we used the medication list in our hospital (2012 SNUBH Inappropriate Medication for Elderly Criteria), which is based on the 2008 Screening Tool of Older Peo- ple’s Prescriptions criteria and 2012 Beers criteria [19]. The medication list for high-risk patients was reviewed by a pharmacist and a geriatrician at admission, and information was provided to orthopedic units by progress notes regard- ing duplicate prescriptions or medications that could cause delirium or were inappropriate for older adults. Based on this information, alternative medications were suggested by pharmacists and geriatricians. A checklist was provided to high-risk patients detailing the implementation of the evidence-based interdisciplinary approach to prevent POD. The items on the checklist included blood pressure and blood glucose control, pain control, defecation and urin- ation, volume status pre- and post-operatively, electrolyte status, sleep hygiene, and sensory deprivation (the use of glasses and hearing aids), and relevant preventive interven- tions were performed from the day of admission to 3 days after surgery. Among the check-list items, pain assessment, pain control, and sleep hygiene education were conducted primarily by nurses. Blood pressure, blood glucose, and fluid and electrolyte balance were evaluated and modified by geriatricians. The entire checklist was screened and modified by a geriatrician on a daily basis and was included
Show more

9 Read more

Effectiveness of moderate walking exercise program (mwep) on fatigue and quality of sleep among cancer patients receiving chemo radiation

Effectiveness of moderate walking exercise program (mwep) on fatigue and quality of sleep among cancer patients receiving chemo radiation

Study concluded that moderate walking exercise programme is highly effective to reduce fatigue and improve quality of sleep in experimental group among cancer patient receiving chemotherapy. Study recommends that moderate walking exercise programme is very highly effective in reducing fatigue and improving quality of sleep among cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, so more nurses should be made aware of this intervention in oncology ward to provide intervention of moderate walking exercise programme. Moderate walking exercise programme should be added as non-pharmaceutical intervention to manage fatigue and quality of sleep among cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The findings reported highlight the need for further research focusing on the long-term effectiveness of moderate walking exercise program on fatigue and quality of sleep. Large scale studies should be conducted in consideration of other contributing variables for fatigue and quality of sleep. Despite the conscious effort to maintain rigor during study, some research limitations need to be mentioned. First, the data were collected through self report method and researcher had to trust on the response of participants. One study setting was taken and the effect of moderate walking exercise programme was assessed only for two weeks duration that doesn’t cover the longitudinal effect of the intervention. This can limit the generalizability of the findings to a larger population in variety of settings
Show more

5 Read more

Buying time: a proof of concept randomized controlled trial to improve sleep quality and cognitive function among older adults with mild cognitive impairment

Buying time: a proof of concept randomized controlled trial to improve sleep quality and cognitive function among older adults with mild cognitive impairment

Participants will first be fitted with the MW8 on the non-dominant wrist and provided detailed information on its features (i.e., the light sensor, event marker button, and status indicator). Participants will be instructed to press the event marker button each night when they start trying to sleep, and again each morning when they are finished trying to sleep. We will also provide participants with the Consensus Sleep Diary (CSD)—which they will be asked to complete upon awakening each morning [56]. After wearing the MW8 continuously for at least 14 days, participants will return the MW8 and completed CSD. We will subsequently download and analyze the MW8 data using MotionWare software 1.0.27 (CamNtech). The responses from the CSD will be used to confirm sleep windows identified by participants (as determined by time-stamped event markers). In cases where the event marker and CSD entries disagree for the start time of the sleep window, we will use the light sensor data to determine “lights out”. Similarly, when the event marker and CSD entry disagree for the end of the sleep window, we will use “lights on” and activity onset to determine the end of the sleep window. The MotionWare software will be used to estimate sleep efficiency (i.e., time asleep expressed as a percentage of time in bed).
Show more

9 Read more

Effects of a mutual recovery intervention on mental health in depressed elderly community dwelling adults: a pilot study

Effects of a mutual recovery intervention on mental health in depressed elderly community dwelling adults: a pilot study

handbook of mental health and the intervention schedule. In addition, a local community worker worked with the instructor as the coordinator to arrange the activities and inform and communicate with the participants. We also chose one participant of each subgroup who was relatively outgoing and good at communication as the leader of the subgroup. The responsibilities of the leaders were as follows: (a) organize and encourage the participants to communicate the knowledge and the difficulties in apply- ing the techniques which were obtained from the sessions, (b) inform the participants about the content that would be taught, (c) set an example and encourage interaction whenever the participants were too shy to follow the requirement, (d) conduct a weekly telephone interview and record their questions on the follow-up, and (e) report the participants’ feedback to facilitators and act as a bridge between the facilitators and the participants for a deeper mutual understanding.
Show more

10 Read more

Behavioral intervention for sleep problems in childhood: a Brazilian randomized controlled trial

Behavioral intervention for sleep problems in childhood: a Brazilian randomized controlled trial

intervention experienced improved sleeping (in 80% of the studies reviewed). Moreover, the positive results were main- tained for 3 to 6 months after completing treatment. A sys- tematic review based on the meta-analysis (Meltzer & Mindell, 2014) demonstrated a moderate level of evidence for the behavioral treatment for insomnia in infants and toddlers. Another review study conducted by an advisory group (Morgenthaler et al., 2006) of the American Acad- emy of Sleep Medicine had identified that behavioral inter- ventions, such as extinction techniques, establishment of routines, preventive education for parents, and sleep hy- giene habits should be considered to be effective therapies for problems related to lying down and awakening at night, resulting in an improvement in sleep patterns. Likewise, scholars (Moore, 2010; Tikotzky & Sadeh, 2010) have already indicated that behavioral interventions, adminis- tered by the parents, were effective in the short- and long-term for the management of insomnia in children.
Show more

13 Read more

Back to Sleep: An Educational Intervention With Women, Infants, and Children Program Clients

Back to Sleep: An Educational Intervention With Women, Infants, and Children Program Clients

Current and prospective parents and other adult caregivers (eg, grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins) of young infants were tar- geted during a 15-minute educational intervention in the WIC clinic at Children’s National Medical Center. The clientele served by this WIC site is largely black. This specific intervention was part of an educational program aimed toward improved fetal and infant nutrition, appropriate nutrition for pregnant and lactating women, and infant safety. The educational sessions were a pre- requisite to obtaining food vouchers. A trained health educator led a small group (3–10 people) discussion regarding safe infant sleep practices. Topics discussed included sleep position, bedsharing/ co-sleeping, and smoke avoidance. Emphasis was placed on de- veloping a curriculum that was culturally sensitive. Because it is common in this community for multiple adults to care for an infant, all potential caregivers were welcomed to the sessions.
Show more

8 Read more

The effects of Red rose essential oil aromatherapy on athletes’ sleep quality before the competition

The effects of Red rose essential oil aromatherapy on athletes’ sleep quality before the competition

The instruments of this study were a demographic questionnaire to collect individual data (especially the history of allergy to perfumes, medicines and certain diseases, a history of problems or mental disorders) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) (Buysse, , 1989). It assesses the sleep quality by measuring seven domains: sleep quality, sleep latency, sleep duration, habitual sleep efficiency, sleep disturbances, sleep mental quality, sleep medications use, and daytime dysfunction.

6 Read more

Efficacy of Structured Yoga Intervention for Sleep, Gastrointestinal and Behaviour Problems of ASD Children: An Exploratory Study

Click here to download PDF version of the article !

ASD is a complex neuro developmental disorder which manifest at early childhood age between 18 and 36 months [1]. ASD symptoms remains throughout life span of an individual unless an early and proper intervention is provided [2]. ASD children are categorized as verbal and non-verbal who suffer from impaired language like initiating communication, use of inappropriate words and repetitive language, non-compliance, irritability, learning disability, etc. Most of the children suffer from disturbed sleep due to not following routine bed time like going to bed in the night and getting up from bed in the morning, awaking in between sleep, snoring and breathing from mouth during sleep etc., which also influences different behavioural problems [3]. ASD children with GI problems may suffer from different digestion problems like bloating, food intolerance, inflammation in intestinal tract, irritable bowel syndrome, diarrhoea, flatulence, urine and faecal incontinence problems, etc., [4]. Autism is one among spectrum disorders, others being Asperger’s syndrome, pervasive Developmental Disorder- Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOD), Rett’s syndrome and childhood disintegrative [5]. Autism children suffer from multiple deficiencies in social communication and interaction, social skills, repetitive and restrictive behaviour, attention deficit, sensory integration problems, motor problems, aggressive or self-injurious behaviour, self-stimulation (finger flapping or head movement), lacking in academic activities etc. ASD children are also prone to anxiety and depression (psychiatric disorder) which deters them to mingle or interact with other children of their age [6]. Children face difficulty in initiating peer communication and may exhibit repetitive motor behaviour [7]. In 1940s, Kanner first identified a group of children who were totally different from other normal children - studied and published a paper on their behaviour
Show more

6 Read more

Mediators of Improved Adherence to Infant Safe Sleep Using a Mobile Health Intervention

Mediators of Improved Adherence to Infant Safe Sleep Using a Mobile Health Intervention

The Social Media and Risk Reduction Training mHealth intervention had a signi fi cant impact on maternal attitudes and perceived social norms regarding choice of infant sleep position and sleep location. Mothers receiving the intervention were more likely to have positive attitudes about supine positioning and room-sharing without bed-sharing and were more likely to state that the people most important to them encouraged these practices. These changes in attitudes and perceived social norms mediated the effect of the mHealth intervention. On the basis of the Baron and Kenny 10 principles, these results suggest that the information provided by the mHealth intervention was successful in promoting SS behaviors by positively affecting both maternal attitudes and perceived social norms in favor of supine positioning and room-sharing without bed-sharing. TABLE 2 The Effect of mHealth SS Intervention on Potential Mediating Factors From the TPB
Show more

11 Read more

A web based photo alteration intervention to promote sleep : randomized controlled trial

A web based photo alteration intervention to promote sleep : randomized controlled trial

Reviewing this evidence, Cassoff et al suggested that merely providing information may not be sufficient and that greater emphasis should be placed on motivational aspects of modifying sleep [12]. This concurs with surveys suggesting that—despite knowing the importance of sleep—many forsake it for immediate priorities such as meeting deadlines [16,17]. That is, they engage in temporal discounting, weighting short-term rewards (eg, completing one’s assignment) over long-term outcomes (eg, reduced risk of all-cause mortality) [18,19]. This aligns with research in other health domains (eg, appetite regulation), where interventions emphasizing short-term gains (eg, financial incentives for weight loss or exercise) were found to encourage healthy behaviors [20,21]. Correspondingly, one way to motivate better sleep patterns may be to highlight short-term outcomes [22,23]—the proximate incentives of increased sleep duration or the proximate costs of sleep curtailment. To this end, we evaluated a sleep promotion program emphasizing 1 immediate outcome—how physical appearances change as a function of sleep duration.
Show more

11 Read more

SLEEP PATTERNS IN PRE-ADOLESCENT CHILDREN: AN EEG-EOG STUDY

SLEEP PATTERNS IN PRE-ADOLESCENT CHILDREN: AN EEG-EOG STUDY

each stage of sleep, total minutes in each stage of sleep, sleep duration, sleep latency, sequence of sleep stages, distribution of. sleep stages throughout the sleep period,[r]

14 Read more

<p>Personalized intervention to improve stress and sleep patterns for glycemic control and weight management in obese Emirati patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled clinical trial</p>

<p>Personalized intervention to improve stress and sleep patterns for glycemic control and weight management in obese Emirati patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled clinical trial</p>

HRV was used as the main method to monitor the variables of this study, including stress levels, recovery levels, and sleep patterns. Real-life and continuous measurements were conducted using a Firstbeat Bodyguard Monitor (FB120140; Mega Electronics, Jyväskylä, Finland). The monitor allows 3 days of continuous data recording and provides a reliable overview of changes in study variables. The device is attached to the skin with two electrodes to minimize skin contact. After the recording is done, the data are downloaded and transferred to special software via a USB port.

9 Read more

Sleep disturbances and quality of life in Sub-Saharan African migraineurs

Sleep disturbances and quality of life in Sub-Saharan African migraineurs

All analyses were performed using SPSS Version 22.0, (IBM SPSS Version 22, Chicago, IL,). Demographic and lifestyle characteristics of study participants were assessed using means (± standard deviation) for continuous vari- ables and counts and percentages for categorical variables. For skewed variables median [interquartile range] were provided. Differences in categorical variables were evalu- ated using Chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test as appro- priate. For continuous variables with normal distributions, Student’s t-tests were used to evaluate differences in mean values by migraine status. Unadjusted, age and sex- adjusted, and multivariable models, were fit to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the associations of migraine and sleep quality parameters (i.e., sleep duration, latency, efficiency and overall sleep quality, daytime dysfunction and sleep medicine use in the past month). Multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models controlled for age, sex, body mass index, alcohol consumption, and smoking status. Confounding variables were considered a priori for documented associations of migraine [42] with sleep disorders and QOL. Independent sample t-tests were used to compare differences in mean values for QOL scores. To determine statistically signifi- cant correlates of migraine among the QOL domains, we performed similar unadjusted and multivariate-adjusted logistic regression models as described above. Given the lack of standard cut-offs for the domains in the WHOQOL-BREF, we used quartiles to define the groups and used the lowest quartile as the reference group in the analyses. All reported p-values are two-sided and defined as significant at the 5% level.
Show more

8 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...