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How to Start a Slow Food in Schools Project

How to Start a Slow Food in Schools Project

Use assessments from the Resource List, from Slow Food USA, or create your own to gauge the effectiveness of your program. What are the strengths and weaknesses of the program? What goals were met and where did the program fall short? What are ideas for future growth? Send evaluation forms to parents, teachers, and involved members of the community. Don’t forget to have the students evalu- ate the program as well! Also, look to non-communi- cated forms of improvement, such as healthier school lunches, an increased interest in nutritious food among the kids, or more involvement from parents and the community. Determine your successes and how to continue them, as well as what could be improved. For example, after the fi rst year of an after-school cooking class, evaluations helped leaders realize that the connection between the class, the students, and their families was the weakest link. As a result, par- ents are now encouraged to attend the classes with their kids, making the program stronger and bridging the gap between the class and the home. The Farm to School Project (www.farmtoschool.com) has a list of evaluations available to download in their resources section. They mostly concern Farm to School projects, but can easily be amended to suit your program.
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Hail the Snail: Hegemonic Struggles in the Slow Food Movement

Hail the Snail: Hegemonic Struggles in the Slow Food Movement

The existing research shows that successful social movements often employ a range of strategies (Levy & Scully, 2007; Scully & Creed, 2005; Spicer & Böhm, 2007). But how these strategies are brought together is not clear. In the case of Slow Food it initially used civic movement organization strategies, but later employed both infra- political and political approaches. This involved a process that we call ‘movement broadening’. Existing accounts of social movement strategy suggest that as movements grow, they are forced to abandon informal infra-political activities to pursue more formalized political activities (for a review see Clemens & Cook, 1999). By maintaining the importance of local convivia, Slow Food was able to nurture direct activities such as tastings and food markets, which in turn allowed them to continue a ‘strategy of autonomy’ (Böhm, Dinerstein & Spicer, 2010) and allowed Slow Food members to govern and direct at local level and to effect grassroots change. Alongside the convivia pursuit of autonomy, other aspects of the movement were involved in a ‘strategy of engagement’ (Levy & Scully, 2007, p. 984; Meyerson & Scully, 1995), based on direct political strategies. This enabled the movement to engage with powerful political entities with significant resources, including the UN, and to construct an organizational basis to sustain the movement. These more formal elements of the Slow Food movement pursued a reformist agenda that sought to work closely with the political elites (Den Hond & De Bakker, 2007). This typifies the dilemma faced by many institutional entrepreneurs of needing to mobilize members within a field, while also reaching into other fields to obtain resources, legitimacy and new ideas (e.g. Greenwood & Suddaby, 2006).
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The Flâneur, The Hot-Rodder, and the Slow Food Activist: Archetypes of Capitalist Coasting

The Flâneur, The Hot-Rodder, and the Slow Food Activist: Archetypes of Capitalist Coasting

We choose to focus on the figure of the slow food activist, then, because in this context they represent the ideal “citizen-consumer,” solving social and environmental problems not by consuming less but by consuming “correctly”—in ways that enhance not only their own bodily health, but presumably also the health of broader ecological and social communities. Again, we use the lower case of slow food to signal that we include more in this title than just the activists who officially participate in the international Slow Food movement, although this figure has certainly been influenced by this movement. Indeed, the Slow Food movement has inspired many popular “foodies,” from Michael Pollan to Alice Waters to Mark Bittman (Pollan, 2003; Parker-Pope, 2009; Bittman, 2011). And, as Bittman notes, although not all are Slow Food members, “there are millions of people throughout the country who routinely buy and cook ‘slow food’” (Bittman, 2011). As such, the slow food activist is not necessarily always identifiable by name like the flâneur or the hot-rodder, but they are nevertheless recognizable to many as a particular sort of “foodie”—popularized in numerous works of both fiction and non-fiction (see, for example, Knisley, 2013; Gilbert, 2007, Kingsolver, 2008; Pollan, 2007; Waters, 2007). The slow food activist is someone who lingers over local, sustainable meals, carefully crafted from farm market produce. Like the flâneur, the slow food activist uses a deliberate slowness as their form of capitalist resistance, this time extending the slowness beyond their physical body to insist that their food also become slower—a counter to the omnipresence of quick, highly-processed convenience foods.
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Transnationales LEADER-Projekt Slow (Food) Travel : Ein vergleichender Ergebnisbericht

Transnationales LEADER-Projekt Slow (Food) Travel : Ein vergleichender Ergebnisbericht

Mit lediglich 5.000 € pro Region ist das Budget in Luxemburg sehr klein (Tabelle 5) und die beiden LAGs Redange-Wiltz und Clervaux-Vianden werden für dieses Projekt mit 100% gefördert. Hintergrund ist die Vorbereitung für ein größeres mit mehr Budget ausgestattetes grenzüberschreitendes Projekt in der nächsten LEADER-Periode. Außerdem sind investive Maßnahmen in Luxemburg nicht über LEADER förderfähig. Die Idee, sich an SFT zu beteiligen kam über das TNC-Projekt CultTrips, in dem die LAG Redange-Wiltz schon seit 2010 u.a. mit der LAG Oststeirisches Kernland zusammenarbeitet. Dabei ging es auch um die Nutzung von Synergien mit anderen LEADER-Projekten im touristischen Bereich, v.a. CultTrips. Die Slow Food-Idee ist ein inhärenter Bestandteil des CultTrips-Projekts, das nicht nur die regionale Esskultur, sondern auch regionale Geschichten, den Kontakt mit den Einheimischen etc. mit einbezieht. Wichtig ist die Qualität dieser Geschichten, die hinter den kulinarischen Erlebnisprojekten stehen. 22
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Slow information in theory and practice: a qualitative exploration into the implications of a Slow perspective of human information behaviour

Slow information in theory and practice: a qualitative exploration into the implications of a Slow perspective of human information behaviour

Slow Food elevated taste education to a formal level in 2003 when the Università degli Studi di Scienze Gastronmiche (University of Gastronomic Sciences) was founded near Bra, Italy, the town where Slow Food has its headquarters. The University’s “goal is to create an international research and education center for those working on renewing farming methods, protecting biodiversity, and building an organic relationship between gastronomy and agricultural science” (University of Gastronomic Sciences, 2012). This academic institution, combined with the Slow Food Foundation for Biodiversity, work to raise awareness of alternatives to fast food and fast living. In striving to protect current food products from disappearance, the Foundation maintains the Ark of Taste which lists endangered products by country that “have productive and commercial potential and are closely linked to specific communities and cultures” (Slow Food, 2012b). This demonstrates Slow’s readiness to exploit contemporary opportunities (in this case, commerce) to protect tradition and diversity.
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Slow Movement/Slow University : Critical Engagements. Introduction to the Thematic Section

Slow Movement/Slow University : Critical Engagements. Introduction to the Thematic Section

Abstract: This thematic section emerged from two seminars that took place at Durham University in England in November 2013 and March 2014 on the possibilities for thinking through what a change movement towards slow might mean for the University. Slow movements have emerged in relation to a number of topics: Slow food, Citta slow and more recently, slow science. What motivated us in the seminars was to explore how far these movements could help us address the acceleration and intensification of work within our own and other universities, and indeed, what new learning, research, philosophies, practices, structures and governance might emerge. This editorial introduction presents the concept of the "slow university" and introduces our critical engagements with slow. The articles presented here interrogate the potentialities, challenges, problems and pitfalls of the slow university in an era of corporate culture and management rationality.
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The Slow University: Inequality, Power and Alternatives

The Slow University: Inequality, Power and Alternatives

Self-help slow experts can advise us to improve our own lives by going slower. But this is not too far away from university managers who respond to stress and overload by pushing it away from the institution and structures on to individuals, by proposing solutions such as stress counselling or time-management training. And can we all slow down? HONORÉ says (in SCHARRENBERG, 2014, n.p.): "I do think it is possible for everyone". But slow can be code for "I have the money to take time". Slow food, for example, is labour intensive and involves taking longer over the growing and making of what we eat. It can be done more easily by those who have the income to take time outside work to do more in the growing and creating of their food, and is less available to those with lower incomes working longer hours. For slow for everyone more structural solutions are needed. Food counter cultures like freeganism, skip diving (EDWARDS & MERCER, 2007) and punk cuisine (CLARK, 2004) challenge power and inequality more than the Slow food movement does (for a critique of which see SIMONETTI, 2012). And slow food may be as much an issue of displaying a liberal middle class identity as about food itself. [36]
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Agency, design and 'slow democracy'

Agency, design and 'slow democracy'

Situatedness is normally taken to be an issue of place, or placement. It is, I suggest, equally an issue about time and speed; the situated producer of democratic models will recognise the need to survey political terrain slowly (deliberately, mindfully) in order to understand the distinctiveness of locality. These eight points offer an account of devices and practices in slow democratic design which hold the promise of providing real substance to more abstract invocations of slow democracy. Again, a keen sense of the limits as well as the promise of such accounts matters – to acknowledge its limitations is, crucially, to help to bring into focus the further work, beyond the remit of this article, required in this emergent field of concern and critique. Consider for example that a democratic system, as a set of political institutions and practices subject to design thinking, can be seen as just one part of a wider set of relationships and structures of democratic society. A wider democratic society perspective must for instance encompass further political questions about time, not least inequalities of class and gender (think of women’s time versus men’s time), which design perspectives tend to leave aside. It might be objected that democratic design, as I have framed it here, is an elite exercise (who does it, or who gets to do it?) focused on elite political actors and institutions (parliaments and courts, for example). There is a notable – even
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Slow saccades in cerebellar disease

Slow saccades in cerebellar disease

Eye movements are frequently considered diagnostic markers indicating involvement of the cerebellum. Impaired amplitude of saccades (saccade dysmetria), impaired gaze holding function (horizontal or downbeat nystagmus), and interrupted (choppy) pursuit are typically considered hallmarks of cerebellar disorders. While saccade dysmetria is a frequently considered abnormality, the velocity of saccades are rarely considered part of the constellation of cerebellar involvement. Reduced saccade velocity, frequently called “ slow saccades ” are typically seen in a classic disorder of the midbrain called progressive supranuclear palsy. It is also traditionally diagnostic of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. In addition to its common causes, the slowness of vertical saccades is not rare in cerebellar disorders. Frequently this phenomenology is seen in multisystem involvement that substantially involves the cerebellum. In this review we will first discuss the physiological basis and the biological need for high saccade velocities. In subsequent sections we will discuss disorders of cerebellum that are known to cause slowing of saccades. We will then discuss possible pathology and novel therapeutic strategies.
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Slow information in theory and practice: a qualitative exploration into the implications of a Slow perspective of human information behaviour

Slow information in theory and practice: a qualitative exploration into the implications of a Slow perspective of human information behaviour

control of my workload. Er. But today, I knew what today was before I began it and I know that I’ve organised my Friday to work from home, to catch up and to write a paper so it’s great. And I also think, I don’t know you know the kind of personality types, I’m dubious about them, but the one thing I constantly find in the Myers-Briggs is that whilst I’m not, I don’t have a particular strong measurement on 3 of them, on the, where I get my energy from, whether it’s from extroverting activity or introverting activity - way over on the extroverted! [laughter] I’m, so, you know, it’s such extremes, so being in meetings to me is rewarding and being present and listening carefully and interacting, very rewarding. So, I, it’s funny kind of coming in, ‘cos I got really excited by Slow when I first got engaged with it, thinking “yes, I do want to me more present” and the more I did it, the more I thought “actually, I think I am fairly present” and I think there’s a bit of a false dichotomy in Slow stuff about…and I think it means different things for different people so I think if you’re someone who generates a lot of energy from being introverted, being alone doing something, very rewarding. Someone who, in my case, being with people, listening and enjoying company isn’t…
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Representing Slow Violence and Resistance

Representing Slow Violence and Resistance

knowledge is informed by one’s location, while calling attention to how dominant perspectives assume a stable and omniscient vantage point. Nixon (2011, 16) articulates this as the issue of ‘who counts as a witness’ connected with ‘conflicts over who bears the social authority of seeing.’ Opening up new sightlines, the papers here interrogate claims of visibility and raise significant questions of surveillance and power. Reversing the “gaze on power” as an analytic practice to “make transparent the metanarrative of knowledge production – its spectatorship for pain and its preoccupation for documenting and ruling over racial difference” (Tuck & Yang 2014, 817), our papers engage what critical race theory scholars identify as “dark sousveillance” (Browne 2015). The Growing Up Policed research team, for example, uncovers the relationships between the structural disinvestment of their community for profit, and the criminalization and policing of young working class people of color, an ontological violence that “blames the victim” (Cahill et al., in this issue). This is also evident for Pain et al., in the historical and continuing dispossession through stigmatization of the UK’s coalmining communities. Elsewhere, in a study of embodied experiences of online bullying, Brydolf-Horwitz (2018) identifies “the persistent cognitive disconnect between the virtual and the corporeal, and the language that enacts or justifies such distinctions,” highlighting not the invisibility of slow violence, but how it is talked about and responded to—or not discussed or recognized at all.
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SLOW ADSL TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

SLOW ADSL TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

slowness on ADSL services provided by AfriCentral ISP. By Zeyn Khan.. Providing Investigation Tests to AfriCentral ISP for Further Investigation Purposes – Page 6 Section 6.. POTS Filte[r]

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Slow light in photonic crystals

Slow light in photonic crystals

Slow light with a remarkably low group velocity is a promising solution for buffering and time-domain processing of optical signals. It also offers the possibility for spatial compression of optical energy and the enhancement of linear and nonlinear optical effects. Photonic crystal devices are especially attractive for generating slow light as they are compatible with on-chip integration and room temperature operation and can offer wide-bandwidth and dispersion-free propagation. This paper reviews the background theory, recent experimental demonstrations and progress towards tunable slow-light structures based on photonic-band engineering. Practical issues related to real devices and their applications are also discussed.
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THE CYTOGENETIC EFFECT OF SLOW NEUTRONS

THE CYTOGENETIC EFFECT OF SLOW NEUTRONS

This value has been used in all conversions of millivolts into neutron flux. A summary of the physical characteristics of the graphite treatment cham- ber is given in table 2. [r]

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Scintillation counters for slow neutrons

Scintillation counters for slow neutrons

Absorption and Emission Spectra of Scintillation Materials Effect of Temperature on Luminescence Effect of Electrical and Physical Environment orl Lumina seance Effect of Radiation on Lu[r]

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The logic of fast and slow thinking

The logic of fast and slow thinking

One may take the logical approach proposed above as roughly standing to ‘static’ (S5) epistemic logic and AGM belief revision theory as Kahneman and Tversky (1979)’s prospect theory of rational choice stands to expected utility theory. Just like prospect theory, our logic of fast and slow thinking is more complex than its mainstream counterpart: it adds operators and parameters to the standard frame- work for epistemic logic, in order to provide a more realistic account of reasoning by Humans. Complexity is generally taken as a theoretical cost, to be justified by a gain in explanatory and predictive power. Here we have an unavoidable trade-off. Any framework for epistemic logic needs to strike a balance between two desiderata. The pull towards simplicity and idealization leads in the direction of Logons. The pull towards modeling realistic Humans can easily lead to conceptually gerrymandered frameworks, or to logics that are too weak to be of serious interest. Take Human Jill, who knows that 𝜙 ∧ 𝜓 . What epistemic facts follow? She may fail to unpack her knowledge, so she need not know that 𝜓 . She may also not know that 𝜒 , although 𝜒 turns out to be logically equivalent to the conjunction of 𝜙 and 𝜓 .
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The slow implementation of EC Directives

The slow implementation of EC Directives

thesis doc Bachelorthesis The slow implementation of EC Directives by Elke ter Beek s0077410 Public Administration Supervisor N S Groenendijk University of Twente 1 Table of content INTRODUCTION 2 1 T[.]

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Bidirectional alterations in ALFF across slow-5 and slow-4 frequencies in the brains of postherpetic neuralgia patients

Bidirectional alterations in ALFF across slow-5 and slow-4 frequencies in the brains of postherpetic neuralgia patients

Interestingly, we found bidirectional alterations in ALFF values across slow-4 and slow-5 frequency bands between the PHN and HC groups, which represent a novel discovery regarding frequency-dependent alterations in PHN patients. We observed significantly decreased ALFF values in the bilateral cuneus/lingual gyrus and the right PFC in the slow-4 band but significantly increased ALFF values in the bilateral BS/CAL and the left POC in the slow-5 band. Decreased ALFF values in the right PFC and increased ALFF values in the bilateral BS/CAL were consistent with the results of the typical frequency band; combined with the slow-4 and slow-5 bands, these values may be more sensitive for detecting altera- tions in spontaneous brain activity in PHN patients. However, this idea requires further study. Moreover, increased ALFF values in the slow-5 band in the left POC were positively correlated with VAS scores. The POC may be involved in the integration of visual information and somatosensory signals; 43
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Slow Violence and the Representational Politics of Song

Slow Violence and the Representational Politics of Song

From the late nineteenth century, UK miners slowly but surely built strong unions to provide for their needs and purposes. National Government came to resent and fear this power, and began a sustained attack on their industry and their way of life. This was backed by representational violence from the media and, when the miners were pressurised into striking in the 1980s by threatened pit closures, by police and military occupation and force, starvation and finally criminalisation. The 1980s pit closures have been described as ‘the most dramatic contemporary example of social transformation in Britain since the Second World War’ (Bennett et al 1991:1), having led to geographically-concentrated severe social, economic and emotional harm. Even after this state violence was successful, and there were no more coal mines or union power, it has continued through a lack of assistance for these areas resulting in the slow destruction of the communities themselves:
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Slow north south dynamics on PML

Slow north south dynamics on PML

Finally, we conjecture that the surface complexity condition in Theorem 1.1 is not only sufficient but also necessary. If so then this problem is subtly different from the equivalent problem for matrices. In GL .N; Z/ exponentially slow con- vergence occurs even when N D 3 . One such family is given by the matrices

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