Social and Culture

Top PDF Social and Culture:

Monuments: E San Social and Culture Reflection

Monuments: E San Social and Culture Reflection

According to history of monuments built by the concept of local people in E-San that is not a government concept, the first monument in this category was built in 1968 the Chaopho Si Nakhon Tao monument at Ban Mueang Tao, Mueang Tao subdistrict, Phayakkhaphum Phisai district, Maha Sarakham province. After that, many other monuments were then created until the present day. Classification of monuments that are created according to persons can be divided into 2 groups: historical persons and legendary persons. The study found that the use of legendary persons was used to create monuments the most. Current condition of the monuments consists of the location of the monument, it’s found that most of the monuments are located in the public area of the community such as the community’s ancestral spirit forest (Don Pu Ta) where is normally located on the north side of the community, facing to the East. The monument layout, it was found that there were 2 patterns independent and rectangular layouts, the rectangular is mostly found. The shape of the monument, a human-like shape is mostly found showing gestures in both sitting and standing positions. The materials and construction techniques, materials used are usually cement, stone and brass, applying fresh mortar molding techniques, stone carving and brass casting. For the reflection of E-San society and culture, it was found that the monument can reflect the image of E-San society in 3 aspects: the creation of social collective memories, the power relations, conflict and contention in the management of monuments among people in the community and role and function for the communities, this consists of main function as the monument plays a role in the sanctification of the rituals in the community as well as helping to support the community agriculture cycle. Regarding the latent function, this consists of social control and create the unity of society, while the cultural reflection consists of 2 aspects: beliefs towards the monuments, consisting of a belief that regards the monuments as a sacred place, therefore, there were people who make solemn promises, pay homage, asking for blessings and encouragement as well as beliefs in ancestral spirits, resulting in annual ritual sacrifice ceremony in order to express faith to the monuments, holding rituals. There are both personal rituals and community rituals. Five elements of the ritual consists of: the place for holding the ritual, the ritual person, the object of the ritual, the time of the ritual and ritual processes and sequences.
Show more

9 Read more

Autonomy, Social Interactions and Culture

Autonomy, Social Interactions and Culture

Our work is also related to a strand of research that examines the issue of how values and beliefs are transmitted and of how, if at all, are immigrants integrated. A recent literature analyzing the relationship between individ- ual identities and social contexts emphasized how networks and social ties systematically affect individual behavior when persons make choices and undertake actions that are economically relevant (Constant and Zimmer- mann, 2008; Akerlof and Kranton, 2010). Herding behavior, compliance and homophily generally prevail against non-conformity in decision-making (Akerlof, 1997). On the other hand, economic theories of cultural integra- tion examine and compare marginal gains and costs of different integration strategies. The main result of these studies indicate that the prevalence of an oppositional culture in the minority group can be sustained only if the group is sufficiently large, the economic cost of the resulting actions sufficiently small and there is enough segmentation in role models (Lazear, 1999; Bisin et al., 2011).
Show more

42 Read more

University education and the culture of social participation in Bulgaria

University education and the culture of social participation in Bulgaria

At the same time, my experience with the two previous projects led me to the conclusion that there was no real effort to include and engage all groups in the university, as well as the top-management, in concrete roles and tasks in these projects. This is why the two main principles on which I built the programme were those of caring and inclusion. The programme consisted of 11 different projects, organised in four stages of implementation. During the first stage of this programme, the university was engaged in promoting the culture of care in its internal environment and in this way in facilitating the development of different groups of participants (students, teachers and administrators). During the second stage, the experience of the internal liberalisation of university relationships was planned to be transferred to other organisational cultures, (in our case those of one institution for children and of two secondary schools). This way, the university could really engage with present social problems. Following the reflexive learning stages, in its third phase, the programme invited the participants in both previous stages to reflect on their experience and to develop new knowledge. This new knowledge was planned to be transformed into teaching materials or courses that were more relevant to social reality and its issues. During the fourth stage, this new knowledge would be implemented at the broader community and policy level. (For a more thorough description of this programme see Appendix 1. Programme for stimulation of enterprise and care at the university, p.248)
Show more

289 Read more

The Tendency of the Automobile Design with the Influence of Social Culture

The Tendency of the Automobile Design with the Influence of Social Culture

Compared with the United States, China's automobile culture favors business-oriented or urbanized look automobiles. Due to some policy restrictions, the large truck and jeep with large horsepower need clients to cost more money for gasoline and maintenance. For ordinary families, automobiles are tools for transportation. The powerful off-road vehicles are not fit for Chinese families who live in urban areas. For example, in Beijing, due to Beijing’s huge population base, traffic congestion always happened during the rush hour. The large horsepower automobile would waste more gasoline than regular cars, which is unnecessary for ordinary families. Thus, on the design, compared with the off- road jeep and truck, the automobile design style and modeling language are focused on modern city style, while the size and the horsepower are smaller than the jeep or truck. Accordingly, the different types of SUVs and Sedans are designed. On the other hand, Chines clients need to consider various factors to choose a car for daily life using, Meanwhile, they preferred an automobile with the elegant exterior appearance for showing the social identity.
Show more

15 Read more

A review of the social impacts of culture and sport

A review of the social impacts of culture and sport

The results of the literature review have implications for policy decisions. At a fundamental level, there is a considerable weight of evidence demonstrating social impacts from sport and culture, which justify policy interventions with public funding. Without these, it is unlikely that individuals will participate to the extent necessary to fulfil the social impact potential of sport and culture. At a more micro level of consideration, there are two related policy implications. It is important to promote initiatives that are explicitly designed to generate specific social impacts; rather than population-wide policies. It is also important to ensure that complementary features are in place to maximise the social impact realisation through exploitation of important mediating factors. These include safe environments, high quality leadership, structured sessions, and expert support for personal development.
Show more

137 Read more

Social Capital, Culture and Innovation: a different perspective

Social Capital, Culture and Innovation: a different perspective

wide, positive environment conductive to innovation, and then it is necessary to focus on the building elements of such a necessary environment. Culture seems to be one of these elements. It has to do basically with the general set of values, beliefs, knowledge, attitudes and ideas which form a widespread common understanding and ways of thinking. These generally accepted ways of thinking serve as a yardstick for the acceptance or the refusal of the social models proposed to the people. At the very beginning of the innovation process there are the individuals. Individuals also are the main recipients of the innovation process. An individual's attitudes, values, ideals, and beliefs are greatly influenced by the culture in which he or she lives. That’s the reason why any innovation policy assumes the form, and thus the complexity, of a tentative social change, with all the consequences that this implies (slow, difficult, complex, path dependent, influenced by history, by geographical conditions, etc…). Culture is the main asset to promote innovation. The cultural features of a society have the power to direct people’s minds towards objectives, they can, in some way, shift social preferences from a model to another, they make some values and ideals more or less appealing than others, to people that then will try to pursue them by means of their actions. This is the process by which culture determines social actions and then economic trends.
Show more

24 Read more

Utilizing The Social Transaction Theory Of Social Ontology To Understand Organizational Culture Change

Utilizing The Social Transaction Theory Of Social Ontology To Understand Organizational Culture Change

If social structure is being continually negotiated and renegotiated in the present, then the same applies to organizational culture and other social and economic issues for that matter. Each time members of an organization socially transact, the underlying negotiation may implicitly or explicitly change the previously negotiated social order. Although culture may not noticeably change on an hourly or weekly basis, it can be argued that it is continually changing, although that change is most frequently very subtle or not even noticeable. Culture certainly changes as other changes are introduced to the organization. Changes can range from internal changes, such as new personnel, new assignments, new products and services, and new policies and procedures; to external changes, such as changing clientele, markets, competitors, or shifts in the business cycle. With each change, the individuals within the organization transact and negotiate what those changes mean to both themselves and the organization. The emergents from these transaction/negotiations may range from barely detectable to blatantly obvious. More importantly, leaders and managers take part in these negotiations whether they intend to or not. They are just as much a part of the social transaction from which culture emerges as any other member. The emphasis is intentional. Even though management expects that their organizational power and authority grants them significantly greater influence, most often that influence is limited in how well it can determine social outcomes within the organization. More often, the outcome can differ from the desired result through no fault of the change initiator.
Show more

6 Read more

A web of intercorrelations: culture, financial reporting and social output

A web of intercorrelations: culture, financial reporting and social output

determinants of IFRSs adoption together with an operational definition of culture - as the dominant collective mental model that individualizes a society from another by being the subject of a learning and inter-generational transmission process - along with an analysis of the impact of IFRSs adoption status on the social output. Moreover, this section identifies some particularities of the accounting regulations in the European Union which make the general conceptual background a feasible descriptor; Section 2 tries to provide an empirical support for the thesis that there are some significant connections between the characteristics of the cultural paradigm and the financial reporting in the European Union and also for the connections between the impact of financial reporting on the social output dynamics via the quality of the informational social system; Section 3 includes derived comments and (auto) critics.
Show more

16 Read more

Framing Social Values:
An Experimental Study of Culture and Cognition

Framing Social Values: An Experimental Study of Culture and Cognition

lined above, 18–21 year old Latina Americans were a strategic subject set for the present experiment. Nevertheless, the narrow focus on a small set of subjects in this age, gender, and ethnic category limits the empirical scope of the present findings. How might broader vari- ations in such characteristics as age, gender, social class, and the like among Latin Americans, or, indeed among members of other ethnic and racial groups, shape the social value framing process? Future work should address this and related questions. Varying dramatic narratives in the design of experi- ments in large-scale, representative sample surveys might be a useful tactic for expanding the empirical scope of the work reported here. Culture in practice (Sewell 1999) as a per- son moves through the complex cultural mosa- ic entails a number of important variables qualifying the social value framing process. As an individual traverses subcultural bound- aries defined by politics, kinship, education, etc., what sorts of cultural cues will shape the accessibility of internal schematic cultural frameworks and grant primacy to specif ic social value concerns? How might social inter- action in a mixed gender situation versus an all-one-gender situation condition the value framing process? What sorts of internal cultur- al frameworks and related social value con- cerns become accessible when a member of a given ethnic, racial, or social class group inter- acts with peers versus outgroup members? These and similar questions point to important issues for further study.
Show more

11 Read more

India: a land of social diversities and composite culture

India: a land of social diversities and composite culture

Hinduism has developed gradually out of the synthesis of sacrificial cults brought into India by the Aryan invaders around 1500 B.C. with religion of various indigenous people. The most characteristic feature of Hinduism however, is the doctrine of an eternal soul and its rebirth. Even in its classical period (600 B.C. to 450 B.C.) Hinduism was characterised by an astonishing variety of doctrines and cultures. It was regarded however, as a retrograde step when these varieties of culture, ritual and mythology became hardened into social strata and castes. The distribution of Hinduism is widespread throughout the length and the breadth of the country. Almost the entire country with the exception of the extreme North in North Western corner and the North Eastern corner shows that Hindus form over 80 percent of the total population. In many parts of the country such as Orissa large adjoining tract of Madhya Pradesh and adjoining area of Andhra Pradesh where the population is almost entirely (about 90 per cent or more) made up of Hindus. There is another distinct area of Himalayan region (Himachal Pradesh, Uttaranchal) and sub-Himalayan district of Uttar Pradesh the proportion of Hindu population is high above 95 per cent. Hindus are less numerous in Punjab, Kashmir Valley and the predominantly tribal areas of North- East India.
Show more

10 Read more

Social Psychology, Consumer Culture and Neoliberal Political Economy

Social Psychology, Consumer Culture and Neoliberal Political Economy

Given its significance, prominent social theorists have come to agree that modern Western culture is a consumer culture (e.g. Baudrillard, 1970/1998; Bauman, 2005; Giddens, 1991; Gorz, 1989; Harvey, 1989; Ritzer, 1998); that is a culture organised around the consumption of goods and leisure, “rather than the production of materials and services” (Marshall, 1998, pp. 112-113). Conceptually, Ritzer, Goodman and Wiedenhoft (2001) divide consumer culture into four main areas, these include the ‘objects of consumption’ (televisions, smart phones), the ‘sites of consumption’ (shopping malls, cruise ships, airports), and the ‘process of consumption’ (the manner in which people consume). For the purpose of this paper the focus will be on the fourth area highlighted by Ritzer et al., (2001), the ‘subjects of consumption’, that is the role that consumer culture plays in the experience of life and formation of self-identity. Miles (1998) writes that social theorists study consumer culture by documenting its psycho-social impact. “The consuming experience is psycho- social in the sense that it represents a bridge that links the individual and society” (p. 5). Like Miles (1998) we seek to analyse the link between self-identity, consumer culture and neoliberalism.
Show more

40 Read more

DIMENSIONS OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN INDIAN CULTURE

DIMENSIONS OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN INDIAN CULTURE

An undeniable fact is that the companies have a responsibility towards the society and its stakeholders and shareholders. This fact has been made compulsory under the Companies Act, 2013 also where wealth maximisation does not remain the sole goal of the companies for their shareholders. The companies have to think about various people including employees, suppliers, customers, banks and other lenders, regulators, the environment and the community at large. Today’s business world, involves all these players from the entire world due to globalisation and everything being online. So the need is to contribute companies share for social purposes. It is a way of giving back to the society by distributing a particular portion from their profits. In India, there are many firms which are engaged in CSR activities and the Ministry of Corporate Affairs has come up with voluntary guidelines for firms to follow. The amendments under the Indian Companies Act 2013 with mandatory laws has created a balance between what the companies are earning in terms of profit and what it is
Show more

9 Read more

The ownership of time: culture, property and social theory

The ownership of time: culture, property and social theory

or “human being” is missing. Yet how to begin to derive this value? This Chapter suggests two routes: one via the claims(s) attached to the dead, and the other via the claims that are made between the living. To begin with the first route, a question that irradiates the various approaches to the scientific study of Kennewick Man is: when do the dead become “history”? That such a question is central to modem legal and social theory is unavoidable; the theorizing of modernity has remained transfixed with its own reflection in and through war and the atrocities that accompany state- sanctioned violence. In keeping with this, the well-established link between cultural property and war is as evident in the case of Kennewick Man as it is in UNESCO claims arising out of civil wars and invasions around the world. The ethnic cleansing and related looting and dispersal of cultural artifacts that have become familiar in the media and over the internet in the past years548 were practiced as well in America in the first two hundred years of European settlement. As will be seen below, many of the practices of collectors and scientists in anthropology easily fall into this category.
Show more

257 Read more

CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY- AN IMPACT ON INDIAN CULTURE

CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY- AN IMPACT ON INDIAN CULTURE

CSR does not give immediate results. The same CSR initiative will also not work for all types of organisations. Designing CSR initiative requires careful planning and implementation mechanism. Corporate organisations should integrate the innovative CSR strategies into different marketing communication strategies to build and sustain a competitive advantage. Corporate social responsibility has a significant impact on the profitability of MNCs, and it is a positive impact, which includes good business relationship, good will among other benefits. In today„s competitive market, CSR offer an opportunity for companies to explore other areas of improving profitability. Customers have become very sophisticated and very much aware of their environment against the perception that corporate organisations make a lot of profits, it becomes imperative for these companies to put back into the society through corporate social responsibility programmes. Even though the benefits from CSR are over a long time of time, it is such that it gives a lot more intangible benefits to the organisations. Such benefits include, customer loyalty, brand image, improved corporate image, market share and community presence. For academic and industry discourse it is recommended that further study should be conducted to establish the real value in monetary terms how much CSRs contribute to the organisations profitability. Also further research should be conducted to quantify how much or to what degree these CSR programmes have impacted on the society and its corresponding value generation for the company. As a result, the environmental aspect of CSR is seen as the duty to cover the environmental implications of the company„s operations, products and facilities; eliminate waste and emissions; maximize the efficiency and productivity of its resources; reward for externalities and minimize unethical practices that might adversely affect the enjoyment of the country„s resources by future generations. In the emerging global economy, where the internet, the news media and the information revolution shed light on business practices around the world, companies are more frequently judged on the basis of their environmental stewardship (CIBN). Partners in business and consumers want to know what is inside a company. This transparency of business practices means that for organizations, CSR is no longer a luxury but a requirement.
Show more

11 Read more

Animal Genomics in Science, Social Science and Culture

Animal Genomics in Science, Social Science and Culture

If something positive came out of the intense and often acrimonious public debate on GM crops and foods in the UK, it is that it catalysed the current interest in upstream public engagement in science policy, 75 and for animal genomics there is some prospect for the development of new participatory modes of regulatory development. For example, the regulatory status of different human-animal chimeras is not yet wholly fixed and the human-rabbit experiments mentioned above exposed a regulatory grey area centred on whether the resulting embryos could or would be considered “human”. The situation is complex too for human-mice chimeras, and the legal and regulatory landscape is as unclear as the moral and the ethical. 76 Yet this lack of clarity could be turned into an opportunity for the creation of a socially robust policy and regulatory agenda. This will require “social intelligence” on public and expert opinion, and so becomes an opportunity for social science.
Show more

28 Read more

Social learning, culture and the ‘socio cultural brain’ of human and non human primates

Social learning, culture and the ‘socio cultural brain’ of human and non human primates

Two groups with model trained to open artificial fruit by lift versus swing door. These methods spread differentially with a bias for those well connected in the social network to open the fruit earlier and use the method they witnessed. van de Waal et al.

56 Read more

SOCIAL CULTURE AND NUTRITION

SOCIAL CULTURE AND NUTRITION

of the adult diet, it is obviously necessary to consider the theoretical sources of pro- tein available to the Bengali village mother, which could be used for feeding her child. The most[r]

13 Read more

Articles | British Journal of Community Justice

Articles | British Journal of Community Justice

It is important to bear in mind that the performance culture is not specific to any one agency or sector; nor is it a new phenomenon. Its most recent manifestation can perhaps be traced to the 1980s/90s and to the strength of successive Conservative governments’ political dominance and adherence to the principles of the market and competition. Ideas derived from the world of business extended beyond business confines and came to enter public sector discourses so that, early on, managers and practitioners in public services were introduced to concepts such as ‘cost effectiveness’, ‘efficiency’, ‘value for money’ and the like. In addition, agencies such as social services, education, health and the probation service were required to demonstrate and account for what they did in a way that politicians, policy makers and tax payers could understand and judge. Effectiveness was to be assessed by results which required evidence, usually measurable and clearly definable. League tables were introduced and, professional outcries notwithstanding, came to be one of the dominant arbiters of effectiveness and performance applied to schools, universities, hospitals and other public sector institutions. In another development, professionals in the public sector such as the police, teachers and some government departments were introduced to performance-related pay where individual performance was to be measured against a pre-determined set of criteria.
Show more

11 Read more

The abbasid rulers: lifestyle and culture

The abbasid rulers: lifestyle and culture

In all the cases of Abbasid dynasty, it is found that the Persian or Iranian culture was very influential. Similarly, the reflection of the Iranian culture on dresses was very conspicuous. Its influence was noticeable in the architectural beauty of state buildings, the personal and social life styles, fashions of government officers. The Abbasid ascended the throne, the Iranian dresses achieved the honor of national dress.Abu JaffarMonsur declared first the black hat of Iranian design as a part of military uniform. Following the predecessors, there was a special honor for Iranian dress and fashion to the people of this region during the regime of Hadi and Harun-or-Rashid. In this era, Iman Abu Yousuf proposed to make separate dress and turban for Muftis, Judges and wise men. Nevertheless, there was no practice of separate uniforms for them (Akhter, 2006).
Show more

5 Read more

Post-war sociology in Yugoslavia.

Post-war sociology in Yugoslavia.

From 1946 to approximately 1950, the Communist party of Yugoslavia, following the practice of the U.S.S.R. had replaced sociology with historical materialism. The split which occurred in 1948 between the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia promoted Lenin's idea of the "different roads to socialism". The Yugoslavs then began to look for new ways, not only in economy, but also in the field of education and in culture in general. Among the most interesting questions that the Yugoslavs have raised was the questions of the role of histori­ cal materialism in the field of social sciences, particularly in the field of sociology. Since the early 5 0 's, the question of the role of historical ma t e r i a l i s m among the social sciences has been occupying the writings of many Yugoslav sociologists. The two earliest writers on this subject are: Boris Ziherl
Show more

288 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...