Sociology of Knowledge

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A contextualized study of vivekananda’s neo vedanta (through karl mannheim approach of sociology of knowledge)

A contextualized study of vivekananda’s neo vedanta (through karl mannheim approach of sociology of knowledge)

For evaluating the role of the nineteenth century Bengali society the frame work of Karl Mannheim approach of sociology of knowledge is going to be implemented. The approach of Karl Mannheim revolves around the central concept that construction or generation of knowledge is correlated to the socio-historical situation of that specific period in which knowledge emerges. Or in other words the comprehension of the knowledge remains ambiguous until one is not aware of the specific allocation of the knowledge in specific time, place and social conditions of that society. Karl Mannheim believes that constructed knowledge has the imprints of the responses or reaction to specific prevailing situation in which knowledge immerges and these imprints remain dubious without evaluating those historical factors that gives birth to knowledge. In framework of sociology of knowledge his neo-Vedanta is going to be evaluated as a particular style of knowledge (reform movement) that emerged in response to the western construction of the Hinduism in nineteen century Bengal (Mannheim, 1954, p. 2).
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On the Construction of Teacher Knowledge from the Perspective of Sociology of Knowledge: Exemplified with Teachers of Open University of China

On the Construction of Teacher Knowledge from the Perspective of Sociology of Knowledge: Exemplified with Teachers of Open University of China

Knowledge system can be to a large extent explained from the perspective of so- ciology, which is the focus of sociology of knowledge [10]. Sociology of know- ledge can explain the influential elements which create knowledge from the ex- ternal factors. The paper, based on the development of state politics and eco- nomics, analyzes the issue on the construction of teacher knowledge, combined with the mission of Open University of China. Besides, the issue can also be dis- cussed from the internal factors. For example, it can be analyzed according to the change of adult learners’ learning style or the change of approaches to con- struction of teacher knowledge on the basis of information technology. Besides, in teaching staff construction, Open University of China adheres to the principle of combing full-time teachers with part-time teachers, giving priority to part-time teachers, presenting open and dynamic characteristics. In other words, part-time teachers will be the main force of Open University of China in the fu- ture. In this paper, the author discussed the knowledge of all the teachers, in- cluding full-time teachers and part-time teachers. In reality, there is no differ- ence between the duty of full-time teachers and that of part-time teachers. For example, full-time teachers are in charge of project management and training part-time teachers. With an intensive study of teaching in The Open University of China, we can further study the composing elements and influential elements of teachers’ practical knowledge of The Open University of China, which will be well studied in the late research.
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A comprehensive analysis of the ideas of C. Wright Mills from a sociology of knowledge perspective.

A comprehensive analysis of the ideas of C. Wright Mills from a sociology of knowledge perspective.

In the early Forties, Mills' major articles were important contributions to the relatively new field of the sociology of knowledge. His first article, "Language, Logic, and Culture," was an elaboration on Mead's work in the explanation of mind and society. Mills thought that previous contributions to the socio­ logy of knowledge did not adequately explain the mech­ anism that connects mind and society, so he proposed two hypotheses to help in the endeavor. The first was drawn from Mead's "generalized other" and "internal­ ized audience." This, for him, was an adequate con­ ceptualization and connection between the individual thinker and the group. The second hypothesis dealt with the place of language and logic in the thought process. With our acquisition of language, Mills be­
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Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Illness narratives and Elias s. sociology of knowledge

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Illness narratives and Elias s. sociology of knowledge

1 Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Illness narratives and Elias’s 14. sociology of knowledge 2.[r]

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Hippies : a study in the sociology of knowledge

Hippies : a study in the sociology of knowledge

For example, in the mid 1960s the paper Heatwave, edited by Chris Gray, could be found making similar points on the relationship of work and leisure, on the 'total revolution of life', a[r]

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IDENTITY AS APROBLEM IN THE SOCIOLOGY OF KNOWLEDGE: THE SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF ABORIGINAL IDENTITY WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE 'WORLD' OF EDUCATION

IDENTITY AS APROBLEM IN THE SOCIOLOGY OF KNOWLEDGE: THE SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF ABORIGINAL IDENTITY WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE 'WORLD' OF EDUCATION

white society; the Aboriginal people, 'as a form'of protest, internalised the negative identity offered to them by white society. Fink speaks about alcoholism and [r]

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Knowledge, Expertise, And Professional Practice in the Sociology of Michael Schudson

Knowledge, Expertise, And Professional Practice in the Sociology of Michael Schudson

1998 xxxvii). Three cheers, then, for the more modest sociologists of knowledge who have, from the beginning of their work, acknowledged that while knowledge and power have a deep and abiding relationship it is not the only relationship nor is it always the most important one. I want to argue in this very essay that we can place Michael Schudson firmly in this moderate, critical-yet reasonable sociology of knowledge tradition, and this identity reveals itself most clearly in his very first work, his doctoral dissertation, completed in 1976 and published in full in 1990. It is this early work on professional knowledge that enabled Schudson, I argue, to arm himself for the debate with Carey later in his career
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Exiles in British sociology

Exiles in British sociology

Several of them saw a problem early, gave a name to it and were taken notice of, while some did the same and were ignored for years. In 1964, Ruth Glass edited a solid volume of case studies entitled London: Aspects of Change, in the introduction to which we read that working-class areas of London ‘have been invaded by the middle-classes...shabby, modest mews and cottages – two up two down – have been taken over...large Victorian houses have been upgraded’. She called this ‘gentrification’, and the term became universally recognisable. Among more specialist concepts, Stan Cohen’s ‘moral panic’ became a staple of the new criminology; Mannheim’s ‘free-floating intelligentsia’ and Michael Polanyi’s ‘tacit knowledge’ entered the sociology of knowledge lexicon; Baldamus’ ‘effort bargain’ gained some currency in industrial sociology; in 1965 Halmos’ The Faith of the Counsellors anticipated some of the themes of Philip Rieff’s more successful The Triumph of the Therapeutic a year later; Elias’ concept of ‘figurations’ is now widely-referred to though less-widely deployed, while the meaning of Andreski’s ‘kleptocracy’ is well understood even if the examples with which he illustrated it - Latin America and post-indepedence Africa - were provocative; in 1964 Herminio Martins published an article on celebrity (in New Left Review of all places) that is never quoted, but his ‘methodological nationalism’ of the 1970s, though it lay on the shelf for three decades, has now been described by Ulrich Beck as the most important concept in twentieth century sociology; Karl Polanyi
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Rethinking the sociology of stigma

Rethinking the sociology of stigma

The “re-turn” to classic sociological concerns with “structure” in stigma research is evident in all the recent “state of the field” reviews around stigma literature. For example, in ‘The Stigma Complex’ (2015) published in the Annual Review of Sociology, Bernice Pescosolido and Jack Martin surveyed the existing literature on stigma (primarily social psychology and health research literature) in an attempt to produce ‘a more synergistic view’ of ‘the complicated nature and effects of stigma’ (2015, p,101). For Pescosolidio and Martin what they term ‘the stigma complex’, attempts to advance an understanding of stigma as a ‘heterogeneous system’ which involves ‘the individual to the society, and processes, from the molecular to the geographic and historical’ and ‘that constructs, labels, and translates difference into marks’ (2015, p.101). At the heart of their account is Goffman’s understanding of stigma as a ‘fundamentally a social phenomenon rooted in social relationships and shaped by the culture and structure of society’ (2015, p.101). The problem, as they identify it, is that research concerned with ‘understanding and changing’ stigma has focused on changing behaviours and beliefs rather than ‘changing the structures that shape social relationships’ (2015, p.101). While in general agreement with Pescosolidio and Martin’s approach to stigma as a psycho-social complex, we disagree with their claim that research focused on ‘changing structures’ ‘remains at an early stage’ or is ‘primitive in nature’ (2015, p.101). Indeed, we hope to illustrate that rich genealogies of stigma theorising --which are precisely focused on challenging structures --already exist but have been marginalised by mainstream social science. For example, research and writing within the long black sociological tradition, social history research on class struggle, postcolonial history and theory, feminist and queer theory, and more recently the theories of spatial stigma developed by critical human geographers (see Slater, this issue). We would also point to the ways in which “stigma struggles” have been explored within literature and the visual arts, and conceived in activist writing and political manifestos. What we seek to illustrate through this collection is some of the ways in which sociologists, geographers, political economists, media scholars and historians might fruitfully extend and supplement the ongoing reconceptualization of stigma as power, by bringing the expertise and theoretical resources of these alternative genealogies of stigma to bear on this field.
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The animal challenge to sociology

The animal challenge to sociology

While recognising that these theorists raise important concerns, we shall offer another response to sociology’s exclusion of non-human animals, one that suggests that the discipline is capable of accommodating the non-human. Our starting point is the argument that animals are already involved in social relations; they have always been an integral part of the political economies of human societies and these societies would not have developed in the ways they have were it not for the crucial role of animals. This presents sociology with both a challenge and an opportunity. It is an opportunity to develop a social ontology able to encompass humans and other animals, enabling us to get to grips with the complex forms of their entanglement. The challenge lies in how to do this. We argue that only a reconfiguration of a number of sociology’s key ideas will enable this, much in the way that feminism has insisted is the case with gender. Here we focus on two concepts in particular: society and agency. These ideas are core to sociology and a full consideration of either one of them would be well beyond the scope of a journal article. However, our ambition is to identify the difficulties associated with using these terms in a contemporary context and to suggest that the sociological imagination cannot confine itself to the
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Journal of Sociology and Anthropology

Journal of Sociology and Anthropology

The purpose of the StrengthsFinder is to help participants identify their greatest strengths, and once identified, encourage participants to continually use those strengths in both everyday life and work. The purpose, therefore, is purely intra-professional development for the participant. However, the StrengthsFinder may also have implications for sociology research as many businesses and professional organizations administer the assessment to their employees. Further, the assessment is routinely administered in college and university settings and the results often are used to group students into social groups for team-based learning activities and projects.
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Sociology Social change.pptx

Sociology Social change.pptx

 Rapid social changes and the uncertainty they cause make it more likely for people to engage in collective behavior..  Can also result in social change.[r]

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Journal of Sociology and Anthropology

Journal of Sociology and Anthropology

Statement shows that early marriage is the culture of rural areas the same statement supported by [8] that 70.6% respondent were agreed that early marriage is the culture of rural areas. Further majority 93.8% respondent being were viewed that early marriage is the culture of rural areas furthermore 1.6% of the respondents were not favor the statement and 4.7% of the respondent have no knowledge about the statement. Table indicating that early marriage become burden on family. Further the 72.7% respondent being were viewed that early marriage become burden on family. While 21.9% respondents negated the statement and 5.5% of the respondent have no knowledge about the statement. The next table shows that 60.9% of the respondent agreed that broken family is a cause of early marriage while 23.4% respondents negated the statement and 15.6% of the respondent have no knowledge about the statement. The views of the respondents show that 49.2% of the respondent agreed that due to early marriage couple lost job opportunities while 28.9% respondents negated the statement and 21.9% of the respondent have no knowledge about the statement. Moreover, table shows that 59.4% of the respondent agreed girls are largely viewed as an economic burden on family. While 21.9% respondents negated the statement and 18.8% of the respondent have no knowledge about the statement.
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Journal of Sociology and Anthropology

Journal of Sociology and Anthropology

Though, the study revealed that: enforcement of school rules and regulations that guide against immoral behaviour; enforcement of time-book for teachers; and ensuring regular attenda[r]

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Journal of Sociology and Anthropology

Journal of Sociology and Anthropology

The university worldwide is regarded as the citadel of knowledge, the fountain of intellectualism, the most appropriate ground for training of future leaders. However, over the last thirty years in Nigeria, the University system has witnessed unprecedented industrial actions than other sectors. Statistics revealed that from 1981 to 2018, ASUU embarked on industrial actions 22 times to drive home its demands. The last one in 2018 lasted more than four months. These numerous industrial actions always led to the disruption and fluctuation of the University academic calendar as well as loss of academic sessions, which might pave way for mediocrity and academic backwardness. Aside the mediocrity, industrial actions delayed and extended the duration of studies in university in the face of age barrier in Nigerian labour market. The plummet of the economic value of graduates, which is a major problem. In some cases, industrial actions avail students for criminal activities, such as armed robbery, kidnapping, and cultism. These crimes have made the youth a problem to societal peace and order in Nigeria. The strike could also account for why many Nigerians students prefer to attend tertiary institutions in neighboring African countries (Republic of Benin and Ghana) and South-Africa.
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Journal of Sociology and Anthropology

Journal of Sociology and Anthropology

The questionnaire composed of three sections: pupil traits sleep styles for the duration of a standard college week and the night time earlier than an exam, and frequency of sunlight[r]

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British sociology, the bourgeois media sociology hybrid
and the problem of social class

British sociology, the bourgeois media sociology hybrid and the problem of social class

In the course of their work, responsible journalists do many things, but the most difficult assignment in a under-determined liquid modern society is to explain social inequality in a language that does not resort to clichés of class – which as we have seen sociologists have not shown much interest in geing rid of. e trouble is – as I argued at the begin- ning of this article drawing on the example of the Great British Class sur- vey – journalists in the bourgeois media resort to sociology because they assume that it is, to quote once Sartre again, ‘in principle, independent of any sort of ideology’. One of the important cultural roles, perhaps the most important cultural roles performed by responsible journalists is to correct public conscience by revealing lies and telling sobering truths. But what happens when these journalists’ aempts to correct the public conscience not only collude with ideology but are also ‘out of joint’ with the social reality in our contemporary moment? In the next part of this article it will be demonstrated that it is not only the dualism between the ‘culture industry’ and mass-circulated media that we need to be liberated from but also what I call the bourgeois media-sociology hybrid, a totally bastard art-form, whose homogeneity corresponds with the typical scene in sociology.
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Sociology. SOCI/Sociology SOCI 2050 SOCIOLOGY OF SPRT. Updated: 2/5/2016 6:04:13AM Term:1161 Spring 2016 Sociology

Sociology. SOCI/Sociology SOCI 2050 SOCIOLOGY OF SPRT. Updated: 2/5/2016 6:04:13AM Term:1161 Spring 2016 Sociology

NextGen classes use a combination of experiential/small group learning activities to give learners the feel and benefits of a smaller class size; online learning exercises give student[r]

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History of and in Sociology

History of and in Sociology

No intellectual historian myself but an enthusiast for comparative-historical analysis in sociology and elsewhere, let me shift the ground to an area where retrospective ethnography and critical comparison clearly do compete with each other. Looking at the field they define broadly as historical sociology, Julia Adams, Elisabeth Clemens, Ann Shola Orloff, and a host of contributors have recently produced an impressive volume of critical and synthetic essays. They call their book Remaking Modernity. The hefty book undertakes two related tasks: to interpret changes in the practice of historical sociology, broadly defined, since World War II; and to make the case for culturally situated interpretation as a superior alternative to the deterministic, externalist accounts of social processes most of the book’s authors see as having prevailed during the later twentieth century. As method, interpretation clings to retrospective ethnography, just as much of the previous work Adams et al. criticize clung to critical comparison.
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Sociology and social policy

Sociology and social policy

Complementarity Between Empiricism and Idealism This dissertation provides sufficient reasons for a policy analyst to choose to make a succinct statement about the ideal of social justic[r]

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