Stimulating Factors

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In vitro and in vivo activation of endothelial cells by colony stimulating factors

In vitro and in vivo activation of endothelial cells by colony stimulating factors

This study was designed to identify the set of functions activated in cultured endothelial cells by the hematopoietic growth factors, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and to compare them with those elicited by prototypic cytokines active on these cells. Moreover, indications as to the in vivo relevance of in vitro effects were obtained. G-CSF and GM-CSF induced

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Immunological and functional differences between human type I and II colony stimulating factors

Immunological and functional differences between human type I and II colony stimulating factors

Two distinct types of colony-stimulating factor (CSF) have recently been described in human tissues and cultured cell lines. Antisera to purified type I and II CSF were prepared in rabbits. Anti-CSF I antibody inhibits CSF I, but has no effect on CSF II. It cross-inhibits CSF I from several other human sources, but does not inhibit CSF from mouse lung or mouse L cells. Anti-CSF II antibody inhibits the activity of CSF II, but has no effect on CSF I. A radioimmunoassay for CSF I has been established. Competitive binding assay further demonstrated the immunological differences between CSF I and II. When CSF II is used to stimulate human marrow cells fractionated by sedimentation velocity, two populations of CFU-C are separated, one sedimenting at 8 mm/h and forming colonies by day 7, and a second sedimenting at 6.8 mm/h and forming colonies by day 13. In contrast, CSF I does nt stimulate colony growth by day 7 but does do so by day 13 in cells sedimenting between 7.2-8.5 mm/h. These results indicate that CSF I and II are distinct in their biochemical, immunological, and functional properties.

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Prevention from a community perspective facilitating and constraining factors perceived by nurses in local community health centers in the course of prevention and health promotion

Prevention from a community perspective facilitating and constraining factors perceived by nurses in local community health centers in the course of prevention and health promotion

The purpose of this paper is to explore the sti- mulating factors and the obstacles experienced by nurses in community health centres in their work with prevention and health promotion. We conducted the qualitative research design con- sisting of fifteen nurses in five community health centres in Ghent. There was also a focus group and participant observation. All participants ex- perienced stimulating factors as well as obsta- cles in their work with preventive interventions. The most strongly facilitators were the Elec- tronic Medical File and the multidisciplinary ap- proach. The obstacles mentioned by the nurs- es were the communication problems and the financial problems. This study may have an im- portant impact on nursing practice and nursing prevention. Further research is needed on nurs- es working in community health centres and the way they approach their patients in the course of preventive actions.

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RESEARCH ARTICLE The mediating role of metaworry between emotion oriented coping and negative beliefs about rumination: A transversal analysis of emotional dysregulation

RESEARCH ARTICLE The mediating role of metaworry between emotion oriented coping and negative beliefs about rumination: A transversal analysis of emotional dysregulation

The metacognitive beliefs are a component of universal cognitive practice that contributes to either positive beliefs or negative beliefs about rumination. The positive beliefs imply repetitive or perseverative thinking being a helpful strategy and giving an insight into the problem, while, on the other hand, when the stimulating factors remain and a failure is faced in solving the situation at hand, the individual further experiences negative thoughts that interfere with problem-solving, are unconstructive and uncontrollable. 11 These negative metacognitive beliefs

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The nutritional management of a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia

The nutritional management of a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia

It should be kept in mind that diet alone does not play a role in the management of neutropaenia. Antimicrobial prophylaxis, colony- stimulating factors, a protective environment (i.e. isolation), oral care, central venous catheter care, hand washing and personal hygiene are recommended for cancer patients on chemotherapy in evidence-based guidelines developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for the management of neutropaenia and the prevention of opportunistic infections. 24

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Nicarbazin Induce Oxidative Response and Colony Stimulating Factor Production in Mouse lung Cells In Vitro
 

Nicarbazin Induce Oxidative Response and Colony Stimulating Factor Production in Mouse lung Cells In Vitro  

Nicarbazin is an effective and wide spread recognized substance for controlling the protozoal diseases with low number of short term adverse reactions. There are some molecular mechanisms proposed for its adverse effect but no one has conducted a research in vivo. Also there is no evidence found which can illustrate the long term adverse effects of the drug. It may hypothesized that Nicarbazin can affect the oxidative situation of cells by lipoprotein lipase activation. This study investigated the relationship between using Nicarbazin or its ingredients and oxidative stress situation by monitoring changes in the oxidative enzymes activity:Catalase, Glutathione peroxidase, Superoxide dismutase and specific biomarkers of oxidation: Dityrosine and Malondialdehyde. The study also investigates Nicarbazin’s effects on colony stimulating factors in lung cells. In conclusion it found that Nicarbazin can worsen oxidative stress and increase colony stimulating factors which may have affect on long term adverse reactions of drug.

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A study of molecules involved in the regulation of the growth of haematopoietic cells and heart muscle cells in culture

A study of molecules involved in the regulation of the growth of haematopoietic cells and heart muscle cells in culture

Since Abboud et al., 1981 reported that giant cell tumour conditioned medium contained C.S.F.’s similar to those found in human placental conditioned medium, colony stimulating factors were isolated from G.C.T. in the present study. C.S.F. was purified from giant cell conditioned medium by ultrafiltration, phenyl-sepharose chromatography, gel filtration and thiolpropyl-sepharose chromatography to give a preparation with a specific activity of 4000 colonies/mg. A minor peak which appeared to have high specific activity was resolved on gel

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Treating a Recalcitrant Non-union of the Radius Using Autogenous Bone, Equine Bone Paste, Equine Demineralized Bone Matrix, Platelet Rich Plasma, and Bone Marrow Aspirate. A Case Report

Treating a Recalcitrant Non-union of the Radius Using Autogenous Bone, Equine Bone Paste, Equine Demineralized Bone Matrix, Platelet Rich Plasma, and Bone Marrow Aspirate. A Case Report

Introduction: Non-unions at forearms are usually challenging and difficult to treat. If additionally, an infection is present, reconstructive surgery should be planned only after full debridement, antibiotic treatment, and confirmation, based on clinical observation and laboratory tests that the infection has subsided. Bone grafting may be required for reconstruction. The use of autogenous bone calls for a second surgical site with an increased risk of morbidity. Using bone substitutes may reduce the need for autogenous bone. Stimulating factors, such as bone marrow concentrate (BMC) and demineralized bone matrix (DBM), may be used concomitantly with bone substitutes to facilitate bone regeneration.

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Evaluation of immunoglobulin G complexed form of thyroid stimulating hormone [MACRO TSH] as interference in TSH assay

Evaluation of immunoglobulin G complexed form of thyroid stimulating hormone [MACRO TSH] as interference in TSH assay

This is to certify that this dissertation work titled “EVALUATION OF IMMUNOGLOBULIN G COMPLEXED FORM OF THYROID STIMULATING HORMONE [ MACRO TSH] AS INTERFERENCE IN TSH ASSAY” of the candidate Dr. C.ARCHANA DEVI with registration number 201523051 for the award of M.D. BIOCHEMISTRY in the branch of XIII. I personally verified the urkund.com website for the purpose of plagiarism check. I found that the uploaded thesis file contains from introduction to conclusion pages and result shows 1% percentage of plagiarism in the dissertation.

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Effect of bFGF and fibroblasts combined with hyaluronic acid-based hydrogels on soft tissue augmentation: an experimental study in rats

Effect of bFGF and fibroblasts combined with hyaluronic acid-based hydrogels on soft tissue augmentation: an experimental study in rats

HA-based hydrogels have been used in tissue engineer- ing for drug delivery systems, wound healing, and tissue regeneration of nerves, bones, and cartilage [37, 38]. How- ever, there have been few studies about the application of HA-based hydrogels to soft tissue augmentation. For other kinds of hydrogels, there have been efforts to apply hydro- gels as biomaterials or scaffolds for soft tissue regeneration. A covalently linked, heparin-containing GAG hydrogel was used for the controlled release of growth factors during soft tissue regeneration in vivo and showed potential as a new biomaterial [39]. Agarose gel was evaluated in an animal model and considered a biocompatible product as a dermal filler [40]. Some hydrogel fillers are already available on the market. Polyacrylamide hydrogel has been approved for

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Remembering the west end : social science, mental health and the American urban environment, 1939-1968

Remembering the west end : social science, mental health and the American urban environment, 1939-1968

an approach united broad environmental factors, so-called ‘hazardous situations’ that could affect an entire community, with the individual, for those whose ‘internal psychic patterns make this situation especially meaningful emotionally, a crisis may develop’. 64 Most individuals returned to a state of emotional equilibrium, often through the aid of interpersonal relationships and a realignment of social interactions, but if complex bio-psychological control mechanisms or social support networks were compromised, the results of even seemingly innocuous events could be devastating. Mental health services could assist communities by specifying dangerous situations, identifying vulnerable individuals and families, connecting them to service agencies and advising those agencies to prevent emotional disorders. Through community involvement, psychiatrists, social scientists and social workers would gradually learn how specific crises led to specific adaptive responses, what Lindemann described as the ‘long range goal’. 65 Wellesley’s relatively

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Stimulation of the proliferation of human bone cells in vitro by human monocyte products with interleukin 1 activity

Stimulation of the proliferation of human bone cells in vitro by human monocyte products with interleukin 1 activity

remodeling could play a role in this "coupling" of bone formation to bone resorption. This study was designed to investigate such a possibility. By measuring both the increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation and in cell number, we found that human monocytes in culture released factors capable of stimulating the proliferation of osteoblast-like cells derived from human bone. Rapidly dividing cells exhibited a greater response to interleukin 1 (IL-1) than confluent cells. The factors are similar to IL-1 in that they exhibited the same molecular weight and isoelectric point, were present in fractions that contained IL-1 activity after gel filtration chromatography and isoelectric focusing, and showed similar dose-response characteristics. Proliferation was more marked when prostaglandin production by the cells, which was also stimulated by these factors, was inhibited by indomethacin. A factor

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The effect of myeloid growth factors on phagocyte-endothelium interactions.

The effect of myeloid growth factors on phagocyte-endothelium interactions.

The myeloid growth factors, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) were initially defined by their effects on the proliferation and differentiation of haemopoietic progenitor cells, but are now recognised to play an important part in enhancing the functions of mature effector cells. This thesis explores and defines the effect of these growth factors on the adhesive properties of phagocytic cells, with particular emphasis on the interaction of neutrophils with endothelium, and the role of the different leucocyte adhesion molecules. GM-CSF and G-CSF produced upregulation of phagocyte surface CD11b/CD18 both in vitro and in vivo, but induced shedding of the L-selectin receptor on neutrophils only in vitro. In vitro, GM-CSF enhanced the adhesion of neutrophils to cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells, while G-CSF was without effect. GM-CSF also demonstrated greater proadhesive effects in vivo: Systemic administration of GM-CSF led to a rapid neutropenia, with a much slower recovery of peripheral cell counts than was seen with G-CSF. Histological analysis using a non-human primate {cynomoigus) model showed that GM-CSF increased neutrophil adhesion to pulmonary vascular endothelium in vivo. In vitro, GM-CSF had differential effects on the transendothelial

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Induced Short-Term Hearing Loss due to Stimulation of Age-Related Factors by Intermittent Hypoxia, High-Fat Diet, and Galactose Injection

Induced Short-Term Hearing Loss due to Stimulation of Age-Related Factors by Intermittent Hypoxia, High-Fat Diet, and Galactose Injection

Mitochondrial damage has been attributed for the death of auditory blast cells due to aging [13,14]; therefore, based on literature identifying relevant factors, animal models were designed according to their lifestyle [15,16]. It has been reported that mitochondrial dysfunction can also be induced by modifying the diet [17]. High-fat diet resulted in increased intracellular lipid content, diabetes-induced symptoms, and impairment of mitochondrial function due to oxidative stress. Caloric regulation associated with deafness has been reported to suppress cell aging through the inhibition of Foxo3 and Sirt1 expression, as well as apoptosis-related proteins [18]. In addition, clinical studies have reported that over 50% of patients with diabetes have hearing loss and if diabetes persisted for more than 5 years, the hearing loss rate would double [19]. D-galactose (D-gal) injection animal models, established by administering successive subcutaneous D-gal injections to animals for approximately 6 or 8 weeks, have been frequently used in aging studies. Accelerated aging factors in rodents induced by D-gal was reported by Guo et al. [20]. In addition, animal models using the galactose injection have been proven to accelerate aging of the brain, kidney, liver, and blood cells [21-23].

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Midwives’ approaches to early pushing urge in labour

Midwives’ approaches to early pushing urge in labour

The objectives of this mixed-methods study were: a) to investigate midwives’ approaches to early pushing urge; b) to explore midwives’ perspectives and experiences of helping women cope with EPU. A quantitative observational methodology was adopted to investigate midwives’ approaches to early pushing urge in 60 EPU cases. A qualitative phenomenological approach was carried out in order to gain more in-depth understanding of midwives’ views and experiences of EPU management strategies. The findings are presented as four main domains: a) midwives’ approaches to EPU; b) drivers guiding midwives’ approaches to EPU; c) influencing factors in helping women cope with EPU; d) variation of midwives’ approaches to EPU over time.

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Transcriptional regulation of the mouse interleukin-5 gene in T lymphocytes

Transcriptional regulation of the mouse interleukin-5 gene in T lymphocytes

Sassone-Corsi 1992]. C onsidering som e of the established features for C TF/N FI, a sim ilar m echanism could be proposed for this family of trans­ acting activator proteins. C TF/N FI is notew orthy because transcripts from this gene fam ily are know n to undergo differential splicing d uring mRNA processing and as a result create different proteins from the one transcript [Santoro et al. 1988; M eisterernst et al. 1988]. The C T F/N FI proteins have also been show n to have functionally distinct dom ains. The N -term inal region is highly conserved and accounts for both the common DNA binding specificity of the fam ily and DNA replication activity, as m easu red by initiation of aden o v iru s replication in v itr o . The proline-rich C -term inal region functions as the transcriptional activation dom ain [M erm od et al. 1989]. In view of the m odularity of functional dom ains d em onstrated for C TF/N FI it seems possible that differential splicing could generate a variant of C TF/N FI th at retains the N -term inal DNA binding dom ain but lacks part of or the com plete C -term inal transcriptional activation dom ain. Such a variant could act as a silencer if its binding to the C TF/N FI site d isrupted the binding or function of adjacent or nearby positive acting factors. If this m echanism for C T F/N FI as a silencer is valid it m ay explain w hy the IL-5 upstream region was not able to regulate the IL-3 heterologous prom oter. If the silencer activity is due to the binding of a variant of C TF/N FI that lacks a frajis-activating functional dom ain then the silencing action m ay be specific to IL-5 because it only interferes w ith locally binding positive factors and cannot silence at a d istance as w o u ld be req u ired in the heterologous construct. Of considerable interest to the present w ork is a recent report by Roy et al. [1992] describing the identification of a new m em ber of the C T F/N F I fam ily of transcription factors that binds to a proxim al negative regulatory elem ent in the rat grow th horm one gene. This pro tein has a m olecular w eight of 45 kd which is at the lower end of the m olecular weight range previously determ ined for the C TF/N FI fam ily of proteins, i.e., 52 kd to 66 kd [Jones et al. 1987]. The low er m olecular w eight of this protein may be due to the absence of a dom ain of the characterised proteins. If this is the case then this protein m ay be a product of differential splicing and thus may represent the first exam ple of a C TF/N FI variant acting as a silencer by the m echanism o u tlined above.

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Factors stimulating social innovation in entrepreneurship: an empirical evidence of inter-organizational alliances in Italy

Factors stimulating social innovation in entrepreneurship: an empirical evidence of inter-organizational alliances in Italy

enables to create more and better value together rather than separately. In this way, collaborative value creation can be defined as ‘‘enduring benefits generated by interaction of the collaborators to accrue societal and individual value’’ (Austin & Seitanidi, 2012). This type of value shows an intrinsic innovative change and, since it creates an innovative standard of capitalism paradigm, it is definable as the new engine for societal change. Thus, entrepreneurship involving social purposes represents a higher form of capitalism, one that creates a positive cycle of community prosperity by stimulating both business and social innovation (Porter & Kramer, 2002). Although non-profit organizations and public institutions create economic and ‘social value’ on their own, social partnerships represent a vehicle through which generate ‘social value’ innovation with a higher impact on the community (Seitainidi et al., 2010). Social partnership is capable of generating value if collaborators not only create a ‘Social Issues Platform’, that is an agreement on significant social issues pursued by their business mission (Selsky & Parker, 2010), but also if they share the intention of altering the earlier ‘status quo’ and improving it with ‘social value’ innovation, creating ‘disruptive social innovation’ (Christensen et al., 2006).

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DENTURE STOMATITIS – A REVIEW

DENTURE STOMATITIS – A REVIEW

Denture stomatitis is the most prevalent and long standing problem in denture wearers. The etiopathogenesis of denture stomatitis is multifactorial and complex to understand. The placement of denture produces significant changes in the oral environment and adversely affects the integrity of oral tissues. The combination of entrapment of yeast cells in irregularities in denture-base and denture- relining materials, poor oral hygiene and several systemic factors is the most probable cause for the onset of this infectious disease. Hence colonization and growth on prostheses by Candida species are of clinical importance. This article gives a comprehensive review of etiopathogenesis and management and current trends in management of denture stomatitis. KEYWORDS: Denture stomatitis; denture wearers; candida albicans

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Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) – treatment of the reduced host defense

Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) – treatment of the reduced host defense

The main emphasis in early ARS phase is to prevent radiation-induced reduced host defense, where the main risk is aplasia and irreversible organ dysfunction. In order to increase the survival rate after radiation exposure, it is most important to prioritize hematologic recovery. The latest general standard intervention is prompt treatment with growth factors. The United States recommendation is growth factors (G-CSF/ GM-CSF) administered as an infusion/subcutaneous dose for the prevention of loss of host defense in ARS. A level of “high radiation exposure” is arbitrarily chosen in order to not overlook potential bone marrow aplasia, as it is impossible to predict how many victims would develop ARS with clinically significant pancytopenia after radiation exposure. However, an important issue here is the prevention of organ dysfunction. In ARS, organs of the host are driven by fixed tissue macrophages which, after stimulation with GM-CSF, will be transformed into immunocompetent dendritic cells, which in turn finally orchestrate the outer-barriers host against endogenous and exogenous microbiological agents. By the administration of growth factors (G-CSF/GM-CSF) systemically, however, the lung is specifically vulnerable to radioactive exposure as its host is isolated from the rest of the circulation system. The alveolocapillary membrane is sealed off from the systemic pool of drugs for protein-like-medicaments. Proteins are, however, soluble and too large to penetrate the membrane. A novel

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Regulation of the hypoxic tumor environment in hepatocellular carcinoma using RNA interference

Regulation of the hypoxic tumor environment in hepatocellular carcinoma using RNA interference

[25]. Liver cancer, such as HCC, are dependent on angio- genesis; therefore, angiogenesis inhibition can be used as a potential treatment modality to inhibit the proliferation and growth of solid tumors [27, 28]. In addition, efforts to treat solid tumors using angiogenesis inhibitors have yielded good results [28, 29]. However, these therapies not only affect solid tumors but also normal cells, which is an area of concern in cancer treatment [27]. Furthermore, cancer therapies, such as transarterial chemoemboliza- tion (TACE) that uses blood vessels may not produce the desired results, and this may even increase vascular pro- liferation and growth into a malignant tumor by incom- plete responses [30]. A correlation between hypoxia, cancer proliferation, and angiogenesis and the mechanism of growth or development of tumors has been observed [31]. If the link between any of the above can be elucidated, the basis for inhibition of tumor growth and excision can be ascertained. This can be achieved by dual control of HIF-1α and angiogenic factors [6]. Innovative and more effective cancer therapies can be developed by regulating HIF-1α expression, which is the key factor in hypoxia, and controlling the expression of IL-8 and other angiogenic stimulators, which restore the angiogenic processes, dur- ing inhibition of HIF-1α expression [7].

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