Teachers and schoolchildren

Top PDF Teachers and schoolchildren:

Schoolchildren searching the Internet - teachers' perceptions

Schoolchildren searching the Internet - teachers' perceptions

Key Stage 3 students are less successful at searching than Key Stage 4 students. While student age may indeed be a factor, it may also be the case that the nature of the searches is different. Do teachers tend to set younger students the task of finding the answers to specific questions, while older children are engaged on more open searches of the type usually associated with project research? Although the findings of Bilal (2000, 2001) did not support the findings of Schacter et al, the question still has relevance.

13 Read more

How Schoolchildren Choose Their Friends, How Teachers Think about These Relationships and What Influence They Have

How Schoolchildren Choose Their Friends, How Teachers Think about These Relationships and What Influence They Have

attributes which influence a student being accepted by their peers and teachers, within a primary school context. The literature surrounding this construct outlines the important roles of peer groups in socialization. Being part of the relations to classmates, pupils classify each other automatically or even unknowingly into categories as a reaction of emotions and acceptance within the strict frame of reference existing in primary schools. Although human beings adopt their behavior to their perceptions, children in primary school classes have different kinds of references in school. However there is a gap in literature which leaves the implicit influence of teachers expectations unexplored. So this study aims to bridge this gap by exploring on the one hand adopted actions to the classmates’ expectations and on the other hand the influence of the teachers’ perceptions and observations on the students’ behavior. To do this, the social network analysis (SNA) was used, as it is a valid method for exploring the social mechanism which takes place in a social system like it can be found in school classes. Therefore the study was conducted in a primary school in Austria. The results demonstrated that teachers influence unknowingly their pupils´ opinion about their classmates´ social network, which highlights the process of social learning.

7 Read more

EDUCATION OF ECOLOGICAL CULTURE OF SCHOOLCHILDREN ON THE BASIS OF ETHNOPEDAGOGY

EDUCATION OF ECOLOGICAL CULTURE OF SCHOOLCHILDREN ON THE BASIS OF ETHNOPEDAGOGY

Given the negative things in the environmen- tal behaviour of children, teachers have made adjustments to the newly planned observation tours, hiking and nature trails. Varied forms and methods of work, picking up more emotional means to infl uence their psyche: movies, com- puter programs, refl ecting the landscapes of his native land, Tatar, Russian, Bashkir, Chuvash, Mordovia, Udmurt, Mari and other songs with touching words that convey mood, thought and aspirations of the people, etc.

5 Read more

Current Status of Intestinal Parasites and Associated Risk Factors among Schoolchildren of Homesha District in Northwest Ethiopia

Current Status of Intestinal Parasites and Associated Risk Factors among Schoolchildren of Homesha District in Northwest Ethiopia

infection is one of the major and serious medical and public health Children being major victims, therefore effective require the identification of local risk factors, particularly among school children. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of intestinal and associated risk factors among Homesha District school children, Northwest School based cross sectional study was conducted from March-June 2015.A total of 395 school children as study subjects were selected from four primary schools by using simple random sampling technique. Data were gathered through direct interview by using a pretested questionnaire. teachers to get correct answer in the case of lower age students. The collected stool specimens were examined microscopically for the presence of eggs, cysts and rasites using direct saline smear and formol-ether concentration methods. square (χ2) test and crude odd ratio were calculated to verify and measure the possible association between IPIs and potential risk factors.

6 Read more

Using Of Information And Communication Technologies In The Teaching Of The School Course In General Physics

Using Of Information And Communication Technologies In The Teaching Of The School Course In General Physics

Abstract : This article was written with the aim of to develop a technology for the application of information and communication technologies in the teaching of the school course in general physics. The following problems are considered in the article: study of the development of students' knowledge as an important pedagogical problem based on the study of the subject of general physics using computer technologies and resources. The hypothesis is verified: to use information and communication technologies when teaching physicists in high school, then - the interest of schoolchildren in science will increase, which will improve the quality of education in physics; whether teachers' interest in using information and communication technologies in physics lessons will increase. To achieve the goal of the study, the following tasks were verified: to analyze the state of t he problem of using information and communication technologies in the educational process as a whole and in teaching physics in particular; to develop recommendations on the use of information and communication technologies in teaching physics; to offer effective directions for teachers to use ICT - technologies in teaching physics. The methodological basis of the study was the work on the theory, methodology and practice of teaching physics. and preparation of recommendations for their implementation in the educational process. The article analyzes the basic concepts of informatization and computerization of the educational process, develops recommendations and gives conclusions.

6 Read more

Perceptions of school and the health of schoolchildren

Perceptions of school and the health of schoolchildren

Current education and health policy in Scotland highlights the important role that schools play in promoting and supporting young people’s health and wellbeing. Research has shown that pupils learn more effectively if they are happy in their work, believe in themselves, like their teachers and feel supported at school (Weare, 2000). Similarly, academic achievement can contribute towards development of a positive self-concept; in a previous study in Scotland, a third of adolescents said that doing well at school made them feel good about themselves (Gordon & Grant, 1997). Such findings are consistent with the health promoting school approach which recognises the importance of a positive school ethos, caring relationships, and a safe and supportive environment to enable young people to fulfil their potential.

6 Read more

Asthenopia in schoolchildren

Asthenopia in schoolchildren

in part to children not finishing activities that induce eye discomfort symptoms, that is, children who due to an undi- agnosed visual function alteration feel discomfort when doing near activities requiring binocular, stereoscopic, and clear focus vision, naturally avoid reading, and, as a consequence, complain less about asthenopia. Moreover, many children do not report having asthenopia symptoms to their parents and teachers, principally because they are not aware of what it feels like to read comfortably. This can, in part, explain the lack of association related to NPC and AC/C ratio findings.

9 Read more

Social support for schoolchildren at risk of social exclusion

Social support for schoolchildren at risk of social exclusion

Teachers not only organize education process at school but also stimulate communication and creative thinking skills thus trying to prevent social exclusion among schoolchildren. According to the respondents’ opinion active teaching methods help to involve such schoolchildren in common work with others. Most often teachers, trying to reduce risk of social exclusion, use work in small groups (score 1,6). Other active teaching methods named by the teachers are: brainstorming (score 3,4), discussions or debates (score 4,1), individual work (score 4,4), case analysis (score 5,1) (Figure 2).

5 Read more

Develop a Participatory Model in Nutrition Education to Prevent Childhood Obesity

Develop a Participatory Model in Nutrition Education to Prevent Childhood Obesity

A checklist of lunch observation was developed by the research team (Appendix 1). This was valuable to as- sess whether the social factors during the lunch time were interrelated in the school environment and if they in- fluenced the issue of childhood obesity. Observation on school lunch was conducted for these four participated children by two researchers in the research team. The observation focused on the speed of eating and their eating habits (e.g. share food, interaction during lunch and roles of schoolchildren and teachers) because these social factors could contribute to the obesity in a school environment. A checklist developed based on the observation results would be critical in bringing the possibly eating issues to the stakeholders and this would be a main pedagogical content to the nutrition education. Meal menu provided by the catering services would also be evaluated by the research team. The meal menu ordered by the four participated schoolchildren in the past one month were assessed according to the “Nutritional Guidelines on School Lunch for Primary School Students” produced by Department of Health [7].

10 Read more

Features of school based anxiety of intellectually gifted adolescents in the modern educational system

Features of school based anxiety of intellectually gifted adolescents in the modern educational system

Psychologists and teachers working with children with a high level of mental development need to use the following techniques: "Legalization" of feelings of anxiety, managing them in such a way as to minimize negative consequences; Teaching a child deep breathing skills that help to control oneself. Slow breathing has a calming effect and is an important skill that children can use in all situations when they need to calm down; Analysis of what the child says about his thoughts and fears. Building confidence in security and willingness to help him; Helping the child to be proactive. Brainstorming and throwing ideas to a child in resolving situations that will help him; Using role-playing games, etc.

7 Read more

Epidemiological aspects and hemoglobin electrophoresis status of schoolchildren in bondoukou (côte d’ivoire)

Epidemiological aspects and hemoglobin electrophoresis status of schoolchildren in bondoukou (côte d’ivoire)

confirmed a prevalence of 21.7% of the sickle cell trait in the Bantu population against 12.1% in the Pygmy population [9]. The values of this study are similar to those of West Africa [17]. The marriage in the same family is an important factor in sickle cell disease. The results indicated a predominance of this factor among schoolchildren whose ancestors had direct family ties, particularly among the Akan and Mande families. These results are almost similar to those of Tolo et al [11], in adult homozygous sickle cell patients whose management characteristics [19] yielded respectively 50% of Kwa and a predominance of Kwa and Mandé ethnic groups. If the results of our study disprove the hypothesis of a high prevalence of Sickle cell disease in Bondoukou, they suggest the long-term possibility for asymptomatic individuals who are unaware of their status. About one in five schoolchildren is a healthy carrier who ignores their status at the time of study. Put in perspective with the total number of pupils in primary school, about half a thousand would be affected by the disease; which reinforces this problem in schools. The prospect of a union between healthy carriers could promote the occurrence of sickle cell disease in African contexts where the diagnosis of the disease is an uncommon practice before customary, legal and religious unions.

5 Read more

Teachers’ Fringe Benefits and Teachers’ Professional Development as Correlate of Teachers’ Job Performance in Senior Secondary Schools in Adamawa State

Teachers’ Fringe Benefits and Teachers’ Professional Development as Correlate of Teachers’ Job Performance in Senior Secondary Schools in Adamawa State

Barton and Wolery (2007) concluded that it looks like the duties and work performance have negative impact on job satisfaction for teachers’ in schools. This was found that teachers’ who scores high performance had also very high morale. On the other side, it was found that teachers’ who achieved lower performance had very poor morale. Specifically, since staffs, even within a single work team, vary considerably in their attitudes, personality and responses, a solution that results well for some will not be effective for others. As webb (2008) opined that there is no “any best way” to take care of the problems. Therefore, what is necessary is a strong strategy to motivate each teacher though, as Al-Farsi (2007) points out; its improvement in the short and long term present a “constant challenge” to school management. However, as I point out earlier, better performance requires not only motivational strategy, but also the expected skills and a conducive work environment with the necessary facilities and conducive working environment.

7 Read more

The influence of oral health conditions, socioeconomic status and home environment factors on schoolchildren's self-perception of quality of life

The influence of oral health conditions, socioeconomic status and home environment factors on schoolchildren's self-perception of quality of life

The schoolchildren were clinically examined at school by two calibrated examiners, in an outdoor setting, under natural light with ball-point probes and mirrors, according to the recommendations of the World Health Organiza- tion (WHO) for epidemiological surveys [37]. The exami- ner calibration process followed the WHO criteria and 20 children were examined in this phase. With regard to the questionnaire, as it has been validated, it was not necessary to conduct a pilot phase to implement them. The exami- ners were calibrated, and good intra-examiner reproduci- bility (Kappa > 0.91) was reached.

8 Read more

Experience of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research as an Example of International Scientific Cooperation in the Frame of Sustainable Development

Experience of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research as an Example of International Scientific Cooperation in the Frame of Sustainable Development

distributed to the stores) women used to go away from their workplaces for shopping and stand in the lines. It was not necessary to look for your matching size, people took what they were offered, and if it didn’t fit, you could change it later among the colleagues. In 1970-1980 the system of “cards” was introduced; those were the card for buying the imported goods. The foreigners used to buy photo cameras, watches, records, vinyl disks and books in the Soviet Union. In the mid 1960’s foreigners could buy a car in native embassy in Moscow. Such purchase was advantageous, but in the mid 1970’s it was stopped. Wives of the foreign employees buy whatever they were short of during the vacancies in their native countries. Often they took requests from their Soviet friends. That is why in comparison with other cities of the USSR, women in Dubna were dressed fashionably and elegantly, in the European style. For instance, women in Dubna started wearing pants, using accessories as part of business suits and using French perfume and make-up much earlier that in the other part of the Soviet Union. Many Dubna school-girls of the 1960’s- 1980’s in March gladly created and pinned their school uniform “martenitsi” (Bulgarian decorations). The schoolchildren of Dubna knew that their foreign friends celebrate Christmas, which, by the way, was accepted not as a religious holiday but as one of the European national holidays. The schoolchildren of Dubna contacted with the European culture of everyday life through games, exchanging of coins, stamps, tested national delicacies brought from home. In Dubna national schools – Czech, German, Polish and Bulgarian - were organized where the foreign children studied their native language, history and culture. Obviously, the language of international communication was Russian language. Foreign children participated in the common school and class activities: excursions and trips to the museums and exhibitions, practiced sport and tourism.

5 Read more

Computer Based Teaching of Lexis in Primary School

Computer Based Teaching of Lexis in Primary School

The rapid development of the information society, the wide spread of electronic information resources, multimedia and network technologies, create prerequisites for the implementation of a new integrated concept in modern education, the main principle of which is the implementation of ICT for personal development of all participants in the educational process: students, teachers, parents. In this regard, the issue of the formation of foreign competence among primary school students becomes relevant in primary school. At the same time, the efficiency of lexical skills formation at an early stage of training largely depends on the use of modern information and communication technologies, which helps to optimize the learning process and its transition to a qualitatively new level of development.

5 Read more

Comparison of Body Weight and Height of Israeli Schoolchildren With the Tanner and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Growth Charts

Comparison of Body Weight and Height of Israeli Schoolchildren With the Tanner and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Growth Charts

ABSTRACT. Objective. To examine the suitability of the growth charts that are currently used in Israel and consider their replacement with a recent standard. In a sample of schoolchildren, the current Tanner and White- house standards were compared with the new growth charts from the Centers for Disease Control and Preven- tion (CDC).

6 Read more

Strategies for Improving Teachers’ Performances in Eswatini High Schools: Views from Teachers and Head Teachers

Strategies for Improving Teachers’ Performances in Eswatini High Schools: Views from Teachers and Head Teachers

Britain, Miller and Le Breton-Miller (2005:178) carried out a study of family controlled schools and discovered that high-performing schools invested much on intrinsic incentives as compared to low-performing schools . Prendergast (2008:156) commented that it is far much better for schools to minimize the use of monetary incentives and match the intrinsic motivations of teachers with the tasks they are willing to do and as such focuses much on the intrinsic nature and reward of the job itself through job enrichment, enlargement and rotation. Intrinsic motivation by its very nature drives an employee’s inner feelings such that they become self- motivated. Employees are able to operate at maximum level with less supervision. what school managers should do is to create an enabling working conditions which inspires employees to willingly exert more effort without claiming monetary incentives In a school set up ,school managers can set specific, achievable and result oriented goals that drive teachers to go an extra mile. Where school managers create an intrinsic working conditions, teachers in most cases are prepared to work even on weekends and school holidays becauce of their desire to achieve their set goals and also to get recognition from students, parents and school administration after they have realized excellent academic student results. Teachers can also be intrinsically motivated if they are given responsibilities that match their abilities. So many a times ,teachers have been seen willingly participating in various school programmes such as sports, traditional dance and music without demanding monetary incentives. . Montemayor (1996:35) found that American high performing schools although they used many different types of pay policies, focus much on intrinsic motivation with special emphasis on professional development programmes which are meant to develop their talent, creativity and innovativeness.. When teachers acquire the right skills and knowledge, they may be inspired to take more challenging responsibilities which raise their self – esteem. Lewis (2000:142) discovered the same during his research at an Am er i ca n h i gh sch ool t h a t m ost t ea ch er s ar e

13 Read more

Dental caries prevalence, oral health knowledge and practice among indigenous Chepang school children of Nepal

Dental caries prevalence, oral health knowledge and practice among indigenous Chepang school children of Nepal

Dental caries is considered a major public health pro- blem globally due to its high prevalence and significant social impact. World Health Organization reports 60-90% of schoolchildren worldwide have experienced caries, with the disease being most prevalent in Asian and Latin American countries [1]. Nearly 41 percent of the total population in Nepal is under the age of 16 years, and of the total school age children, 87 percent are en- rolled in schools. The 2004 National Pathfinder Survey shows that 58% of 5–6 –year- old schoolchildren suffer from dental caries [2]. With the caries prevalence of 58%, dental caries is more prevalent than malnutrition that affects 49% of child population [3]. The Survey reported pain and discomfort due to untreated dental caries in 18% of 5–6 –year-olds and 64% in older adults. Adolescent school children reported inability to eat followed by inability to speak. Studies have reported missed school hours, toothache and several impair- ments of daily life activities associated with a high decayed component in both primary and permanent dentition [4]. Similar findings have been reported in Brazilian preschool children and in a school survey of American native children [5,6]. A study in the Philippines had previously reported significant associ- ation between untreated dental caries and low Body Mass Index [7]. Interplay of socioeconomic, environ- mental and behavioral factors, constitute the social de- terminants of health, are driving the epidemics of communicable and noncommunicable diseases [8]. In Low-Income Countries (LICs), health related behaviors among children are low [9]. Nutritional transition with easy access to refined carbohydrates, low use of fluori- dated toothpaste and irregular tooth brushing habits lead to increasing trend in dental caries in developing countries. Schools provide the ideal setting to reach millions of children and ensure strong foundations for a healthy life at an early stage. The principles outlined in Ottawa Charter focus on healthy public policy and strengthening skills and practices. Focusing efforts in practical school based health activities will help to re- duce inequalities in health. There is no national data concerning the prevalence of dental caries among

5 Read more

Taste hyposensitivity in Japanese schoolchildren

Taste hyposensitivity in Japanese schoolchildren

boys: 60, girls: 52) schoolchildren aged 6–15 years in Saitama Prefecture, Japan. In total, 349 students (boys: 181, girls: 168) participated in the research. Students were 1 st to 9 th grade (1 st -6 th : elementary, 7 th -9 th : junior high) school- children. The research was implemented as part of school health promotion activities, therefore basically all students participated in the activity except for those who were ab- sent. The information about this study was explained to all the students, and the consent was received from the sub- jects who agreed to participate in the study. The research was conducted in 2009 and the study proposal was ap- proved by the Tokyo Medical and Dental University Ethics Committee (Approval No. 250).

7 Read more

Immune Disorders of Dentoalveolar Anomalies in Schoolchildren

Immune Disorders of Dentoalveolar Anomalies in Schoolchildren

Immunologic status in unstimulated oral liquid (UOL) and blood has been conducted at 18 healthy schoolchildren aged from 7 to 14 with intact teeth, as well as 64 schoolchildren with DAA. The diagnosis was based on Angle’s classification. All patients with DAA were passed a clinical examination, including anamnesis collection and medical screening. Anthropometric studies of face and head at all children and teenagers, as well as jaws control- diagnostic models analysis were conducted. Teeth dimension ratio, tooth width ranges by Pont, sagittal variations by Korkhaus’s method was studied, dental arch segments ratio - by Gerlach, tooth ranges shapes, its correlation, as well as the location of individual teeth in sagittal, transverse and vertical planes, were evaluated. In addition, it was used X-ray examination (orthopantomography, teleroentgenography, intraoral contact radiography). A lateral teleroentgenograms analysis of the head has been conducted by Schwartz’s method.

5 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...