Teams in the workplace

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Teams That Work:  Preparing Student Teams For The Workplace

Teams That Work: Preparing Student Teams For The Workplace

Organizations today often require collaboration in the form of work teams. Many tasks completed within organizations, whether in the workplace or in academia, however, can be beyond the capabilities of individuals alone. Productive teamwork and cooperative activities in business are expected and can begin very early in a person's career. The pedagogy for teamwork instruction in the classroom may not simulate real workplace events or parallel organizational behavior in order to attain a successful outcome. In universities, teamwork often breeds frustration and dysfunction, since the teams often do not perform at a high level or reach their full potential. This paper will provide best practices for creating productive teams in the classroom in preparation for the workforce. This insight will include ideas that will bond team members through collective values and goals, resulting in effective teams and a productive environment.
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Regulatory interaction and the adoption of regulatory roles in teams at the workplace

Regulatory interaction and the adoption of regulatory roles in teams at the workplace

Sitzmann and Elly (2011) stated that “self-regulation enables people to function effectively in their personal lives as well as to acquire knowledge and skills needed to succeed in higher education and the workforce” (p.421). So, self-regulation is considered to be very important for increasing, or further improving the quality of performance at the workplace. Also, an important characteristic of the workplace is that employees often need to work together with coworkers or in teams. As a result, employees need to not only self- regulate, but also regulate their social behaviors (Lord et al., 2010). For example teams in the software development sector, who rely on feedback, communication, shared goal setting, planning and monitoring (Moe et al., 2008). Yet, most research is done about self-regulation, which focusses on processes within the individual rather than processes between individuals. Consequently, these socially shared regulation processes, in software development teams, are not well known even though they play such an important role within these teams (Moe, Dingsoyr, & Dyba, 2008; Lord et al., 2010). Vauras, Iiskala, Kajamies, Kinnunen, and Lehtinen (2003) agreed with this view. In their research, they found that, while working in teams, there is constant monitoring and regulation of collective activity. This cannot be reduced to individual activity.
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Innovative Work Practices and Sickness Absence: What Does a Nationally Representative Employee Survey Tell?

Innovative Work Practices and Sickness Absence: What Does a Nationally Representative Employee Survey Tell?

We capture four different aspects of innovative work practices (i.e. high-performance workplace systems, HPWS). These measures correspond to the central pieces of a high-performance workplace from the point of view of employees, as outlined in Appelbaum et al. (2000). Self-managed teams are defined as teams that select their own foremen and decide on the internal division of responsibilities. Information sharing equals one if employees are informed about the changes at work at the planning stage rather than shortly before the change or at its implementation. Training equals one if the employee has participated in employer-provided training during the past 12 months. 8 Incentive pay equals one if the person has performance-related pay and bonuses are based on the employee’s own effort. To examine the joint effects of innovative work practices, we identify “bundles”. Because there is no single definition for summary measures (e.g. Blasi and Kruse, 2006; Kalmi and Kauhanen, 2008), we follow a simple strategy. “Bundles” are captured by our variable HPWS, which equals one if more than one of the aspects of workplace innovations (self-managed teams, information sharing, employer-provided training or incentive pay) is present. 9 We include a vector of control varia bles to all models that can be regarded as ‘the usual suspects’, based on the absenteeism literature (e.g. Brown and Sessions, 1996; Holmlund, 2004; Dionne and Dostie , 2007). The exact definitions including the means and standard deviations of the variable s are documented in the Appendix (Table AI).
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Using workplace population statistics to understand retail store performance

Using workplace population statistics to understand retail store performance

reinforced by the selection of workplace populations as a specific topic for an SLA event (SLA 2014), attended almost exclusively by professionals within this sector. The academic-industry collaboration which formed the basis for this research is also driven by the property function within the Co-op. Nevertheless, a number of the insights gained from our analysis of workplace populations have the potential to support operational decision making related to store operations and marketing, which are not the preserve of location or property teams. Wood and Reynolds (2012) clearly demonstrate the potential for the analysis and insights originating from these location-based functions to support wider decision making across these organisations. We argue that the potential operational uses of these insights related to workplace populations highlight the need for intra-organisational knowledge- sharing in order that these analysis can support both strategic and operational functions. Drawing on our observations in relation to Co-op stores in Inner London, this section identifies specific enhancements to operational and strategic decision making which could be achieved through incorporation of workplace population statistics.
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Pedagogy, Practice and Procedure (The P 3 Project) - Educating Engineering Managers A Model for the Future

Pedagogy, Practice and Procedure (The P 3 Project) - Educating Engineering Managers A Model for the Future

Set within a global workplace where professional engineers need to be multi-skilled practitioners able to work in multi-disciplinary teams , the matter of how to best educate [r]

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Gender-related challenges facing oncologists: the results of the ESMO Women for Oncology Committee survey

Gender-related challenges facing oncologists: the results of the ESMO Women for Oncology Committee survey

Although there are generally more women oncologists in clinical teams than men, women oncologists are less likely to have leadership roles and they feel that their gender is adversely affecting their career. Women feel that less progress has been made in closing the gender gap than men and they feel affected by unequal opportunities in the workplace. The fact that over a third of women in the survey had encountered unwanted sexual comments at work is of great concern and must be urgently addressed. New initiatives are needed to address under representa- tion of women oncologists in leadership roles, including greater promotion of work–life balance, development and leadership training for women, and more support for flexible working.
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Occupational management in the workplace and impact on injury claims, duration, and cost: a prospective longitudinal cohort

Occupational management in the workplace and impact on injury claims, duration, and cost: a prospective longitudinal cohort

Abstract: Few workplaces have prospectively reviewed workplace and worker issues simultane- ously and assessed their impact on Workers’ Compensation Board (WCB) claims. In January of 2014, each worker in a large workplace in Saskatchewan, Canada, was prospectively followed for 1 year to determine factors that impact injury claim incidence, recovery, and costs. In total, 207 out of 245 workers agreed to complete the baseline survey (84.5%). In 2014, 82.5% of workers had self-reported pain, but only 35.5% submitted a WCB claim. Binary logistic regression was used to compare those with pain who did not submit a WCB injury claim to those with pain who did initiate a WCB claim. Independent risk factors associated with WCB claim incidence included depressed mood (odds ratio [OR] =2.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44–9.78) and lower job satisfaction (OR =1.70, 95% CI 1.08–10.68). Higher disability duration was indepen- dently associated with higher depressed mood (OR =1.60, 95% CI 1.05–4.11) and poor recovery expectation (OR =1.31, 95% CI 1.01–5.78). Higher cost disability claims were independently associated with higher depressed mood (OR =1.51, 95% CI 1.07–6.87) and pain catastrophiz- ing (OR =1.11, 95% CI 1.02–8.11). Self-reported pain, physically assessed injury severity, and measured ergonomic risk of workstation did not significantly predict injury claim incidence, duration, or costs. In January 2015, the workplace implemented a new occupational prevention and management program. The injury incidence rate ratio reduced by 58% from 2014 to 2015 (IRR =1.58, 95% CI =1.28–1.94). The ratio for disability duration reduced by 139% from 2014 to 2015 (RR =2.39, 95% CI =2.16–2.63). Costs reduced from $114,149.07 to $56,528.14 per year. In summary, WCB claims are complex. Recognizing that nonphysical factors, such as depressed mood, influence injury claim incidence, recovery, and costs, can be helpful to claims management. Keywords: workplace, Workers Compensation Board, injury claim, depressed mood, return- to-work program, job satisfaction
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Examining the effect of workplace friendships and job embeddedness on turnover intention (the case of mashhad as a tourist destination in Iran)

Examining the effect of workplace friendships and job embeddedness on turnover intention (the case of mashhad as a tourist destination in Iran)

ABSTRACT: In our contemporary times, most corporate organizations have put more importance on the role of human resource in underscoring the success of the organization. They have come to appreciate the significance of human resources to having potential impact of the organization‟s performance and its vital factor used as a vehicle towards potential success in the midst of competition. This study review theory and research on workplace friendships, job embeddedness, and then combines them into a model of turnover intention for hospitality industry in (Mashhad) Iran. The qualitative method design used for this study to provide a comprehensive understanding of the research problem. The study used the qualitative method approach that consists of semi-structured interviews. Each participant answered the research questions that assesses his/her perception towards friendships. According to the qualitative method, a portion of the participants were randomly selected to complete the interview process where more information is collected.
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Do we need to overcome barriers to learning in the workplace for foundation trainees rotating in neurosurgery in order to improve training satisfaction?

Do we need to overcome barriers to learning in the workplace for foundation trainees rotating in neurosurgery in order to improve training satisfaction?

Abstract: Junior doctors go through a challenging transition upon qualification; this repeats every time they start a rotation in a new department. Foundation level doctors (first 2 years postqualification) in neurosurgery are often new to the specialty and face various challenges that may result in significant workplace dissatisfaction. The neurosurgical environment is a clinically demanding area with a high volume of unwell patients and frequent emergencies – this poses various barriers to learning in the workplace for junior doctors. We identify a number of key barriers and review ideas that can be trialed in the department to overcome them. Through an evaluation of current suggestions in the literature, we propose that learning opportunities need to be made explicit to junior doctors in order to encourage them to participate as a member of the team. We consider ideas for adjustments to the induction program and the postgraduate medical curriculum to shift the focus from medical knowledge to improving confidence and clinical skills in newly qualified doctors. Despite being a powerful window for opportunistic learning, the daily ward round is unfortunately not maximized and needs to be more learner focused while maintaining efficiency and time consumption. Finally, we put forward the idea of an open forum where trainees can talk about their learning experiences, identify subjective barriers, and suggest solutions to senior doctors. This would be achieved through departmental faculty development. These interventions are presented within the context of the neurosurgical ward; however, they are transferable and can be adapted in other specialties and departments. Keywords: medical education, foundation program, junior doctors, induction program, neu- rosurgery, learning in the workplace
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Dispositional antecedents and consequences of workplace ostracism: An empirical examination

Dispositional antecedents and consequences of workplace ostracism: An empirical examination

Neuroticism. People high in neuroticism (neurotics) are sensitive to rejection. They tend to perceive interactions with others as threatening, and are inclined to interpret an ordinary unintended interpersonal ignorance as an intended rejection (Horney, 1937; Downey and Feldman, 1996). Moreover, when facing threat, neurotics tend to be upright and often express hostile emotions and behaviors toward others, which in turn may provoke others to response to them in adverse way, such as ostracism (LePine and Van Dyne, 2001; Downey and Feldman, 1996). Drawing on Olweus’s (1978) victim precipitation theory, it seems that the cognitive and behavioral characteristics of neurotics are consistent with the prototypical cognitive and behavioral characteristics of provocative victims (Olweus, 1978). In support of this argument, previous research has indicated that neurotics suffer more interpersonal problems (e.g., interpersonal conflict) and are more likely to become the provocative victims of workplace victimization (Donnellan, Conger and Bryant, 2004; Scott and Judge, 2009). Hence, we expect that neurotics are more likely to be ostracized in workplace.
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Developing new teams

Developing new teams

We aim for a flat management structure so that all team members can approach anyone in the management team and that all team members, including the farm business manager, can be involv[r]

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Leadership by Confidence in Teams

Leadership by Confidence in Teams

of an outside context. Therefore, unless there is a specific outside mechanism at work to induce a particular member to become a leader, leadership by confidence should naturally realize in the environment in which every player chooses his timings of moves. Hence, leadership by confidence is the most natural solution of the team game. Precisely the issue of under what con- dition leadership by confidence emerges as a stable outcome has remained unsolved. This paper explains the natural mode of leadership in teams as an equilibrium of endogenous timing games by identifying a sufficient condition for the emergence of leadership by confidence.
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Family health teams

Family health teams

CONCLUSION The future role of family health teams in academic primary care settings as a place for learners to see teamwork in action and to learn collaboration needs to be examined. Unless academic settings are developed to provide the necessary training for primary health care professionals to work in teams, a new generation of health care professionals will continue to work in status quo environments, and reform initiatives are unlikely to become sustainable over time.

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Identity in Sport Teams

Identity in Sport Teams

Identity in sport teams has been studied from two main per- spectives: a) an individual one, most widespread among sport and exercise psychologists, which focuses on identity as a cog- nitive and stable dimension of the individual (see for example Killeya-Jones, 2005; Cox & Whaley, 2004; Anderson, 2004; Schmid & Seiler, 2003) using standardized scales, tests and interviews to ‘measure’ such an identity (Curry & Weaner, 1987); b) a social perspective, most widespread among sport sociologists and anthropologists, which focuses on wider social variables and contextual features (such as cultural, national, political issues) (Mac Clancy, 1996; Robert, 1999) using narra- tive and ethnographic methodology (see Thiele, 2003; Sparkes, 1996, 1997, 2002).
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Synthesis and Enzymatic Studies of Selenium Derivatized Nucleosides, Nucleotides and Nucleic Acids

Synthesis and Enzymatic Studies of Selenium Derivatized Nucleosides, Nucleotides and Nucleic Acids

specialists, administrators, parents, school psychologists, school counselors, and social workers (Bahr, Whitten, Dieber, Kocark & Manson, 1999; Chalfant et al., 1979; Eidle, Boyd, Truscott & Meyers,, 1998; Lane et al., 2003; Nelson et al., 1991). Many teams use a systematic problem-solving format including problem identification, data collection, generation of intervention, and ongoing assessment of those interventions; some do not (Nelson et al., 1991). Goals also vary from team to team and model to model; however, common goals include preventing unnecessary referrals to special education, providing interventions to students within the general education classroom, and collaborating with teachers to support them and increase their skills (Chalfant et al., 1979; Chalfant & Pysh, 1989; Graden, 1989; Graden, Casey, & Christenson, 1985; Gravois & Rosenfield, 2006; Hammond & Ingalls, 1989; Nelson et al., 1991; McGreevy, Truscott, Sanborn, & Lewis, 2005; Meyers et al., 1996; Pugach & Johnson, 1988).
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Developing the protocol for the evaluation of the health foundation's 'engaging with quality initiative' – an emergent approach

Developing the protocol for the evaluation of the health foundation's 'engaging with quality initiative' – an emergent approach

In such a fluid situation, a rigid evaluation protocol implemented unchanged from the start of the EwQI would have been inappropriate. The emergent approach we developed with The Health Foundation's agreement proved not only necessary but also, we would argue, essential if, through development and evaluation, changes in clinicians' attitudes to clinical engagement in quality improvement are to be identified and encouraged. This paper has described the protocol for the external eval- uation of the EwQI, and the way in which that protocol was shaped by interaction with the project teams during the first year. Our experience has been that this develop- mental approach enhanced the capacities of all involved to reflect on the EwQI and seek to use evidence better in engaging clinicians and delivering improvements for patients and for the health care system. It should lead to a more textured, informed, and modulated final evaluation. Competing interests
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Comparison between Face to Face Teams and Virtual Teams with Respect to Compliance with Directives

Comparison between Face to Face Teams and Virtual Teams with Respect to Compliance with Directives

Many researchers have attempted to find the reasons why virtuality has a neg- ative influence upon team output. Some of the reasons discussed in research li- terature include frequency of interaction and physical distance [23], the fact that team members are not familiar with one another on a personal level [24], diffi- culty in sharing information, and insufficient and confusing discussions [25]. Maruping and Agarwal [26] show that teams tend to use different sorts of com- munication technologies for different kinds of interpersonal interaction. Anoth- er group of researchers compared the impact of various communication tech- nologies on corporate teams, assuming that some technologies limit information transference [27]. The comparisons concluded that FTF teams are more efficient than teams that use video communication [28], and that video communication is more efficient than audio communication [29]. Moreover, the addition of text alongside video or audio communication improves performance [30], and satis- faction [31].
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Self managing work teams that feel empowered: The key to high performing teams?

Self managing work teams that feel empowered: The key to high performing teams?

Most organizations aim to enable high team performance, and high employee quality of life, by implementing self-managing work teams (Cohen et al.,1996). Both team performance and employee quality of life are part of team effectiveness, which is often referred to as a multidimensional construct (Goodman, Ravlin & Schminke, 1987). The empirical research is limited and most studies about self-managing work teams include different categories of team effectiveness as a dependent variable. More and more evidence is gathered that the use of self-managing work teams is positively related to different dimensions of team effectiveness, like increased productivity (Langfred & Moye, 2004; Cohen & Ledford, 1994; Sundstrom et al., 1990), manager and self-reported performance (Cohen & Ledford, 1994), employee satisfaction (Cohen & Ledford, 1994; Cordery et al., 1991; Wall et al., 1986) and organizational commitment (Cordery et al., 1991). Gladstein (1984) used two dimensions to explain team effectiveness. The first dimension was 'group performance' with the subcategories actual sales and self-reported performance, and the second dimension was team member satisfaction. Sundstrom et al. (1990) used perceived performance by the customers or manager, satisfaction among team viability, and commitment of team members towards the team to measure team effectiveness. The last example of measuring team effectiveness is from Hackman (1987). He used three dimensions to measure team effectiveness: qualitative and quantitative output of the team, the satisfaction of the team members to work in the team, and the ability to continue the work activities in the future. All those three definitions of team effectiveness contain performance output and team member satisfaction. Cohen (1993) used besides team performance and member attitudes about their quality of work life, also withdraw behaviors in the definition of team effectiveness. In this study, only the output variables team performance is measured because the longitudinal data was limited within this case study. 2.2.1 Negative effects of self-managing work teams that could threaten the team performance
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German in the Workplace: Workplace Learning for Immigrant and/or Ethnic Workers

German in the Workplace: Workplace Learning for Immigrant and/or Ethnic Workers

From July 2007 to June 2009 researchers and practitioners of the study group DaA investigated communication requirements and practices in workplaces with a high percentage of immigrant workers in 15 companies. They researched the “objective” communicative needs arising from the joint tasks as well as attitudes, expectations and perceived needs of employers and employees with and without a migration background. The project team collected, analyzed and documented authentic workplace oral interactions and documents taking into consideration organizational structures and task contents. Both company ethnography and linguistic analysis aim at laying empirically sound foundations for (further) developing second language provision in and for the workplace.
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Workplace design: Conceptualizing and measuring workplace characteristics for motivation

Workplace design: Conceptualizing and measuring workplace characteristics for motivation

connection and mutual reliance with colleagues, and are characterized by (i) support among colleagues, (ii) trust, and (iii) a sense of community, are those that can also support an individual’s relatedness. Social support has been consistently linked with job satisfaction (de Jonge et al., 2001) and can guard against high demands and low control (Karasek & Theorell, 1990). As an attribute of the workplace, social support describes not necessarily one-on-one task or personal support but rather an amicable and collegial interpersonal climate. Related to this, trust is essential where interdependence and working together efficiently is important (Mayer, Davis, & Schoorman, 1995) for organizational citizenship behavior and collegiality (McMillan & Chavis, 1986). Finally, a sense of community is important for developing a feeling of belonging and willingness for personal investment (McMillan & Chavis, 1986), therefore too supporting the need for relatedness and increasing motivation.
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