Television and Film Production

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Classroom Learning Assessment Interpretation in Journalism and Mass Communication in Higher Education: A Focus on Andragogy in Radio/ Television/ Film Production

Classroom Learning Assessment Interpretation in Journalism and Mass Communication in Higher Education: A Focus on Andragogy in Radio/ Television/ Film Production

They observed learner’s insights of learning assessments, the assignments interests and importance, learner self-efficacy for completing tasks and their goal orientation, and the learning assessment environment. They found that no matter what the learning assessment, learners were more concerned about their needs and interests (Brookhart & Bronowicz, 2003). Brookhart (2001) explored learner’s perceptions about classroom assessment by looking at both formative and summative aspects. The learners selected for the study were successful adult learners ready to make the transition to higher education. The contribution of this study documented and illustrated the way successful adult learners use assessment information. Instructors in higher education are unaware of the assessment effort of colleagues and do not trust or use colleague’s assessment results (Cizek et al., 1995; Hall et al., 1997). In radio/television/film production courses’ projects, most instructors’ learning assessment interpretation focuses on basic aims, mainly recall of knowledge and skill. According to Stiggins et al., (1989); Schilling et al., (1990); Pijl, (1992); Bol & Strage, (1996); Senk et al., (1997), there is little focus on such outcomes as speculation and critical reflection, instead adult learners focus on getting through the tasks and resist attempts to engage in risky cognitive activities (Duschl & Gitomer, 1997). Mezirow (2000) suggested that critical reflection by adult learner in transformational learning is central to the process. Occasionally, the instructor can predict the performance of the adult learner compared to younger learner on project reflecting on basic aims, because the instructors’ assessments do not tell what he needs to know about the learners' learning (Lorsbach et al., 1992; Rudman, 1987).
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Transforming of Literature Work to Television and Film Production

Transforming of Literature Work to Television and Film Production

The development of drama and film adaptation has long been a place in the hearts of the audience. Traditional literary stories have also been adapted to the screen. Among them, the animated of animation film Putih published by Fine Art Animation directed by Rashid Sibir. The film was the adaptation of Bawang Putih Bawang Merah folk tale. Some of the other Malay folk tales that were adapted were Si Tanggang, Badang,Batu Belah Batu Bertangkup and Bawang Putih Bawang Merah. However, the filmmakers must be careful in lifting a script to fulfill the will and quality of an adaptation drama. Through the examining of the state films industry, young people are more competing in mild stories whereas literary works are much better and have high moral values. According to Dr. Anuar Rethwan; Industri filem kita malang kerana kebanyakannya dihasilkan hanya untuk memenuhi kehendak pasaran yang dikuasai golongan muda sedangkan kita perlu mengangkat karya sastera bermutu seperti novel ke layar perak sebagaimana penggiat di Barat dan Jepun lakukan. Walaupun Barat dan Jepun menghasilkan banyak filem komersial, mereka tetap tidak lupakan karya-karya sastera,"(Utusan Melayu, 6 Oktober 2013)
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Classroom Learning Assessment Interpretation in Journalism and Mass Communication in Higher Education: A Focus on Andragogy in Radio/ Television/ Film Production

Classroom Learning Assessment Interpretation in Journalism and Mass Communication in Higher Education: A Focus on Andragogy in Radio/ Television/ Film Production

The same applies to the color in the newspapers. The main means of visual text (especially in terms of the constant competition of the press with television, video, film), the photographs, the color, the info-graphics and the active graphical elements such as lines, frames, backgrounds, textures etc. recently expanded its perimeter and among Bulgarian daily editions. Bulgarian dailies are increasingly orienting themselves towards building a vibrant centres of visual attraction in a different location on the page, as have big color pictures, vivid negative headlines and solid frames. The optical power of the territory further escalated by the inclusion in the general design concept of the attractive info-graphics, self representing illustrations and dominant designed standart typography: headings and logos of the special pages and sections. Active content quotation is already normal visibility, not only for the front pages of daily newspapers, but for their latest pages, which often „go” reading, and with it the tenders, transfers, self promoting.
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Classroom Learning Assessment Interpretation in Journalism and Mass Communication in Higher Education: A Focus on Andragogy in Radio/ Television/ Film Production

Classroom Learning Assessment Interpretation in Journalism and Mass Communication in Higher Education: A Focus on Andragogy in Radio/ Television/ Film Production

Readers were often addressed and appealed to in Kurdish articles. The journal’s interactive character was highlighted in Issue 15: “Our publishing policy, from the beginning, is to encourage women to write, to reveal their existing potentials and to provide a domain to express themselves. In particular, we give priority to people who write for the first time only if it does not conflict with our policy.” As one might understand from these sentences, everyone who desires to write can be writer for ROZA. This policy may be seen as an indicator of the attempt to overcome the reader-writer duality. Stressing collective management and production is the result of the reaction against authority. Operations in the mainstream media stem from centralization in authoritarian and bureaucratic management and special expertise is a fundamental quality demanded in writers and editors. However the collective and participatory structure of alternative media, in management and the creation of the message, eliminates the monocentricity of authority and distributes power among individuals. Being an expert is not a requirement in this process.
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Prerequisite: TVR-7 or comparable experience in Television or Film Production

Prerequisite: TVR-7 or comparable experience in Television or Film Production

15% FINAL TRAILER PROJECT: You will be editing a 1.5 to 2.5 minute long trailer for a provided film. You will be expected to follow some basic criteria for a trailer that is covered in class, and ultimately will be expected to edit together a moving, compelling, and dynamic trailer that sells the movie. All of the techniques that we cover in this course should be at work here. Students that do not turn-in their final project during the class final meeting will automatically receive “0” points for their final project – that’s 20% of your grade!

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Voices from the Peripheries: A Study of the Regional Film and Television Business in Norway

Voices from the Peripheries: A Study of the Regional Film and Television Business in Norway

Such statements are closely related to debates over who should have the power to decide what regional film production can and should be, in which regional film workers underline the importance of television drama and fiction film as an engine for development and continuity in their region because it usually involves more people, longer working periods, and higher budgets than shorts- and documentaries. Earlier, this has been obstructed by government’s policies designed to strengthen the NFI and fiction film in Oslo. Now the new film policy goes in a different direction, and em- phasizes regionalisation. However, several film workers question whether the regions contribute to increased professionalization, and to the success of Norwegian film on the international market. This scepticism is not limited to the film industry. According to Mangset (2002, p.80), the cultural field is centralised, and many artist and cultural experts are sceptical towards a cultural political decentralization. One of the arguments is that film should not be used as a tool for regional development. Inherit in this argu- ment, is an understanding of Oslo as the center of professionalism and quality, and the regions as contributors of diversity and regional development. As production compani- es that both have a strong regional attachment and make critically acclaimed films, the companies challenge the understanding of the regions as mere ‘film cultural perip- heries’ (Rambøll, 2005) or just contributors to regional development. This discussion concerning center and periphery exemplifies how film policy in Norway is comprised of two complementary strands: the development of strong regional production clusters and the positioning of Norway on the international film arena.
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Video, Film and Television Producers Liability Insurance

Video, Film and Television Producers Liability Insurance

An Air Force fighter pilot is shot down during combat and evades capture for six days in hostile territory until he is rescued. The story of his experience receives national publicity. He co-authors two books on the subject, one of which is a best-seller, and he becomes a successful motivational speaker. He gives extended interviews about his experiences to a television production company, which uses the information to create a TV docu-drama. Several years later, a film production company releases a motion picture that is inspired by and loosely based on the events of the pilot's experiences, as reported in the news. The film bears only a slight resemblance to the actual facts of the pilot's story. The producers, however, decide to promote the film by advertising during a special re-broadcast of the docu-drama.
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Sexuality, Gender, and Politics in the Contemporary Horror Film LCC 3256: Major Filmmakers / LCC 3252: Film and Television Summer 2008

Sexuality, Gender, and Politics in the Contemporary Horror Film LCC 3256: Major Filmmakers / LCC 3252: Film and Television Summer 2008

Sign up for a “review discussion” date during the first week of class. By 12 midnight on the Wednesday before your discussion date, post a review of one of that week’s films in T-Square’s Forums. Give the film a rating, a number of stars between one and five. Five stars suggests the film is one of the best horror films you have ever seen or would expect to see; one star suggests it is one of the worst. In the body of the review, persuade your audience (the entire class) that your evaluation is correct by stating the criteria by which you judge the film and explaining how aspects of the film succeed or fail in meeting each criterion. Your statement of criteria should directly or indirectly address the question, “What makes a horror film good?” Your explanation of the film’s success or failure should rely on interpretation as well as your knowledge of horror’s conventions and history. While “it’s scary” is a fine starting point, you should delve deeper to explain why it’s scary. Similarly, “it’s stupid” is a reasonable evaluation, but you should explain why it’s stupid (what makes a horror movie smart?). The review should be 500-750 words (2-3 double-spaced pages).
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Financialized Hollywood: Institutional Investment, Venture Capital, and Private Equity in the Film and Television Industry

Financialized Hollywood: Institutional Investment, Venture Capital, and Private Equity in the Film and Television Industry

Knowing that common ownership in other industries results in decreased competition and increased prices, we should expect the same in Hollywood, even though specific outcomes and effects on content are difficult to isolate. The propensity for joint ventures (e.g., Hulu, The CW, Epix, Movies Anywhere) and joint franchises (e.g., Harry Potter, Terminator, LEGO, James Bond, Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit, Spiderman) is the kind of outcome we can expect from common ownership. Another is that movie ticket prices continue to rise beyond inflation because of the increasingly onerous terms set by the major studios. For example, in order to screen Star Wars: The Rise Of Skywalker (J.J. Abrams, 2019), Disney required four-week engagements in the largest auditorium for a film rental of 65%. 21 Disney’s market power may be the most immediate factor in that deal, but institutional investment also plays a long-term role. Much like climate change, in which any one extreme weather event is difficult to conclusively attribute to human-caused climate change, but the overall probability of extreme weather steadily rises, in Financialized Hollywood, the overall tendency toward consolidation, reduced operational capacity, and minimal competition increases within a climate of financialization and common ownership.
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Becoming what women want : formations of masculinity in postfeminist film and television

Becoming what women want : formations of masculinity in postfeminist film and television

As Denby notes, the male ‘self-dramatising underachiever’ character is at the centre of ‘the dominant romantic comedy trend of the past several years’ (ibid.). The romantic sex comedy is sold most commonly upon images of this type: lazy, failing, overweight, immature figures of boyish masculinity. In contrast to the playboy bachelor figure, casting frequently works against the norms of conventional Hollywood masculine attractiveness. Bodies may be ‘fat’ (Seth Rogen) or ‘weedy’ (Jay Baruchel), short (Jason Bateman) or tall, gangly and ‘soft’ (Vince Vaughn, Jason Segel). Once again, the association of masculinity on film with ‘hard bodies’ is a useful reference point. As I suggested in the chapter on lifestyle television, the trained, disciplined, ‘pathological’ hard body is marked as residual in postfeminist culture, because it does not fit with the new domesticated, soft and emotional masculinities that are presented as desirable for heterosexual coupling
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Unpaid work in the UK television and film industries: resistance and changing attitudes

Unpaid work in the UK television and film industries: resistance and changing attitudes

Many of the key occupations were highly unionised from the mid twentieth century onwards (Gray and Seeber, 1996; Denning, 1996). In UK television, as McKinlay and Smith show (2009), national collective bargaining underpinned labour relations in the industry from the Second World War, based on highly centralised craft unions. All this began to change in the 1980s with the onset of deregulation, marketisation and the opening up of national broadcasting systems to competition (Saundry, 2001; Heery et al., 2004; Saundry et al., 2006; Hesmondhalgh and Baker, 2011). There was a marked shift from a broadcaster/producer model, based on the public service broadcasting institutions of the BBC and ITV, towards independent production which eventually led to growing power foran increasingly well-financed and commercially-oriented
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Getting in, getting on, getting out? Women as career scramblers in the UK film and television industries

Getting in, getting on, getting out? Women as career scramblers in the UK film and television industries

Jones and DeFillippi argue that in the USA, ‘the boundaryless career system challenges its participants to improvise their home and hearth around the unpredictable vicissitudes of frenetic project activity and involuntary unemployment’ and for many film professionals ‘family life had been deferred, denied, or at least compromised during their careers’ (1996: 93, 94). The informality of film and television employment has a major impact on practitioners, especially women who are often adversely affected by the precarious nature of freelance employment and a male- and network-dominated work place. Work patterns, childcare, money and freelance culture affect women practitioners’ decisions to have children or not and whether they are able to sustain a film or media career as parents. While parenting and childcare do not need to be the exclusive responsibility of women, it is striking in our research that few, if any, interviewees discussed this in relation to men, reinforcing assumptions about the gendering of responsibility for childcare. In the UK context, our findings lend support to research from Skillset that highlights motherhood – but not fatherhood – as a key factor in understanding the persistence of gender inequalities in film and television.
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Theatre Arts In the School of Theatre, Television, and Film In the College of Professional Studies and Fine Arts

Theatre Arts In the School of Theatre, Television, and Film In the College of Professional Studies and Fine Arts

The School of Theatre, Television, and Film offers graduate study leading to the Master of Arts degree and the Master of Fine Arts degree in theatre arts. Graduates in these programs learn in the artist- scholar model and are prepared for careers as practitioners and educators. The Master of Fine Arts degree is offered in the areas of acting, design/technical theatre, and musical theatre. The M.A. is a 30-unit program; the M.F.A. a 60-unit program. Both programs of study limit the number of students accepted in order to offer individual attention and extensive opportunity to participate in theatre production. The Dramatic Arts building contains the proscenium-style Don Powell Theatre seating 500, with state-of-the-art computer lighting and sound control, and the flexible Experimental Theatre seating 200, rehearsal and recording areas, a design studio and CADD laboratory, paint shop, wagon house, scene shop, and fully equipped costume laboratory. The theatre arts degree is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Theatre (N.A.S.T.).
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"You have to feel a sound for it to be effective" : sonic surfaces in film and television

"You have to feel a sound for it to be effective" : sonic surfaces in film and television

in pitch of the keyboard note and rhythmic energy of the bass in the background. The unresolved back and forth of the melody expresses a reluctance to move, or perhaps an awkwardness in movement, while at the same time, the pulse provided by the bass exceeds a resting heartbeat and so generates a visceral sense of energy and quickened movement, the combination resulting in music that is both melancholy and hopeful. So, despite her loss, the sense of newness and excitement at Marie Antoinette’s arrival at the French court is hinted at aurally. The rhythmic uplift in tempo seems to offer the possibility of subdued excitement—a movement matched by the audible thud of horses’ hooves and a feeling mirrored in the combination of a close-up on her slightly flushed face and shots of light coming through trees. The sensations generated by the music invite us to share both outer controlled surface and inner mixed emotions. Although the music does not ‘fit’ with the historic look of the film, it is materially tied to her. For K.J. Donnelly, music “performs a primary role in eliciting emotional responses in the audience and in providing consent and encouragement for the audience’s emotional responses” (2014: 127). This moment further elaborates the point that music can place us materially with the character, so that we are enveloped into the complexities of their experience, and drawn into the sensations generated by expressivity of surface textures and motion.
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Creativity management in original television production at the BBC

Creativity management in original television production at the BBC

Ironically, as cultural producers’ dependence on the market grew, the genius myth created during earlier periods continued to spread. In large part this was because of the growth of a new profession that helped increase the persona of cultural producers. Specifically, in order to alleviate tensions between cultural producer and market rationalities, a new ‘intermediary’ profession was introduced as a crucial part of the creative process. It was the responsibility of this division of labour to act on behalf of the cultural producer. At a time when many organisations began to introduce scientific and bureaucratic methods of management (see chapter two), cultural producers were oppositely moving in a more free-floating direction that was governed by these intermediary groups. Williams (1981) introduces the phrase, ‘productive intermediary’ (p.45) in order to explain the new organisational form. Publishers, art dealers and booksellers helped represent cultural producers and at the same time attempted to sell as much of their work as possible. As such, the genius myth was supported and used by these mediators in order to sell more cultural works. At the same time, the growth of new technologies became established concurrently with the new complexities of the market. This resulted in more copies of original works that in turn resulted in the introduction of copyright and royalties that replaced earlier forms of payments that were made directly to cultural producers. Copyrights and royalties led to one of the most significant changes that occurred during the period. Specifically, cultural producers increased their efforts in accumulating new customer / consumers. They did so particularly by becoming what Hauser calls, ‘advocates and teachers’ (p.5) of an oppressed middle class (1962). Arguably, such a responsible role once again strengthens their position as ‘geniuses’. A large portion of literary work was introduced in newspapers as supplements that were bought particularly by middle class readers (Alexander Dumas was paid roughly 200,000 francs yearly for writing in the Presse and the Constitutionnel ibid., p. 14). Various writers became idolised and often other writers were hired as ghost-writers to increase the production and consequently the sales of the newspapers they wrote for. Additionally, newspaper owners often attempted to influence the writing by demanding more violent or adventurous plots; and cliff-hangers became common practise in order to keep the reader interested much like the soap operas of today.
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Effect of television on farmers for their agriculture production technology

Effect of television on farmers for their agriculture production technology

It was found that the effect of television on farmers for their agriculture production technology is the maximum preference given by respondents, providing in employment earnings, Participation freely in discussion of agricultural activities, the topic of Broadcasting on television is required to be at the appropriate time and agricultural programme being beneficial, IPM technology is better than the chemical plant protection technology, a good farmer experiments with new ideas in farming, the way of farming fallowed by fore father is still the best way in farming today, A farmer must earn his living, but the most important thing is life cannot be defined in economic term, a farmer should try any new farming idea which may earn him more money, a farmer must earn his living, but the most important thing is life cannot be defined in economic term, a most successful farmer is the one who makes the most profit.
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Submit:  A Narrative Film Production

Submit: A Narrative Film Production

Thankfully, the new DAT tape arrived shortly after and production resumed. The morning went well from then on for the camera, but the sound was continually a problem. The location was extremely windy. There were industries in the vicinity providing a constant drone. It was the Mardi Gras fortnight of parades and during one morning interlude a line up of floats ran along Tchoupatoulas with their bands playing and general revelry providing a barrage of audio problems for the recordist. Eventually, the recordist positioned himself inside an auto with the DAT and microphone, using the entire vehicle as a sort of impromptu microphone blimp.
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BA (HONS) FILM PRODUCTION (TV)

BA (HONS) FILM PRODUCTION (TV)

This subject develops further skills in video editing. It allows students to explore the creative options open to an editor working with a director and ways in which the editor can influence the final product. Concepts of timing, factors controlling pace, effects of scene transitions on pace of film-film rhythm-filmic time and space-parallel action. Explore different styles of editing to understand and evolve approaches dictated by the purpose and concept of the film. Concepts of timing, factors controlling pace, film rhythm-filmic time and space. Evolving strategies for editing dialogue, action creatively in fiction. Similarities and differences between digital platforms. Evolving strategies to move between platforms. Learning to work on Media 100 (SDI).
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High Definition (HD) Image Formats for Television Production

High Definition (HD) Image Formats for Television Production

The 3G-SDI interface allows for two different mappings of the image format, described in SMPTE 425-2008. This choice of Level also impacts the number of embedded audio channels that can be carried in the interface. Users of the interface should pay particular attention that their production equipment supports the Levels required in operation.

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Good Character: Reality Television Production as Dirty Work

Good Character: Reality Television Production as Dirty Work

Social scientists and cultural critics have also been centrally concerned about the effects of commercialization on creative workers’ ability to express themselves and create cultural objects of quality and value. Such ideas gained intellectual prominence over half a century ago beginning with the Marx inspired Frankfurt School of Critical Theory. Horkheimer and Adorno introduced the concept of the “culture industry” (1977 [1944]) in order to shock readers: the word “culture” was generally equated with the highest forms of human creativity and the most priceless works of art rather than an industrial commodity that could be bought and sold. Scholars following Horkheimer and Adorno argue that mass culture industries are assembly lines, cranking out standardized products, where profit is more important than content. Artists become alienated workers, dominated by an impersonal production process, unable to fulfill their own creative talents. An artist who “goes commercial” is viewed as a “sell out,” trading artistic integrity for financial profit.
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