the art of game design

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Credits. Game Design. Cover Design. Cover Art. Naive Star Logo. Mayara Barros Igor B. Batista Mayara Barros.

Credits. Game Design. Cover Design. Cover Art. Naive Star Logo. Mayara Barros Igor B. Batista Mayara Barros.

The game is played through the four seasons of the year, creating stories for each “episode” and building each of your character’s powers and personalities and finally fight the main antagonist in Winter. There are tables and examples for you to base your own game upon, but you are free, and encouraged, to replace them with your own ideas.

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Bachelor of Creative Design. Game Art. Course Components

Bachelor of Creative Design. Game Art. Course Components

GA1A05 combines 2D art assets and basic scripting, which allows the students to understand how user experience is affected through art, design, and code. Utilising game development techniques and tools, the students will create their own arcade style games, which requires a multifaceted approach including the following: Project Management, Art and Design Theory, User Interaction, Menu Systems, Audio Integration, Scripting, and Game Design. These trans-disciplinary artefacts scaffold the student’s knowledge for the second year of study, when they will interact with the Bachelor of Software Engineering students.
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Performing design: game design, practice, praxis and the theatre of the impressed

Performing design: game design, practice, praxis and the theatre of the impressed

Game design is not typically perceived as part of the field of design. As an educational course option it is often an add-on to a course which has evolved in a department with expertise in art and animation or science and technology. Indeed, in the games industry, game designer is not an entry level position description but one that is earned by excelling at other work within the industry (Stevens, 2012). In the contemporary games industry, which is demonstrating a change of emphasis to smaller, agile teams, designers must also be able to turn their hand to other roles in order for the work to reach production. Thus game designer is not actually a clear role in the sense that one can become a game programmer or game asset modeller, the majority of traditional game industry designers are indeed Koster’s ‘straddlers’. In spite of all this, game design (as opposed to game development or art and animation) is offered as a potential pathway to graduate outcomes in many tertiary institutions as a third choice for those who do not wish to take the science option: programming, or the art option: animation. Game design courses frequently conflate design and development with production and marketing by structuring their curriculum around final capstone team projects with commercial potential. In these studio units, teams will be made up of students from different majors (or specialities), thus the programmers and the artists and animators and the game designers will be expected to work together to produce a playable game for exhibition and portfolio. Such studio based capstone units are indeed applauded by many as ideal practice based experience and skills confirmation for students intent on direct transition into the industry (Haukka, 2011) and while this may be true for those team members with programming and art or animation skills, the designer and the design process is not as clearly presented.
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The art of Gamification; Teaching Sustainability and System Thinking by Pervasive Game Development

The art of Gamification; Teaching Sustainability and System Thinking by Pervasive Game Development

Due to the short development time for the game and the students’ relatively little practice in system thinking, we decided to provide the students with basic system CLDs (Causal Loop Diagrams) of the mini-games. These CLDs gave them a broad overview of the system for which they were to create the games. The students would have to pick a part of these large systems and modify the CLDs so they reflected their own game design. The CLD for the main pervasive game had to be developed from scratch. Several system thinking sessions were also held in this period, which ensured that the students really used system thinking in their game development, and the game became consistent in terms of the sustainability content. The system models were programmed in Stella and the three digital mini-games in the Unity game engine. To preserve the sustainable solutions simulated in Stella, equations and results from Stella were programmed directly into Unity.
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Video Game Design Method for Novice

Video Game Design Method for Novice

video game, however, he needs to think about its design from different aspects, including modelling, rendering, animation, and its impact to the society. Although it is a team work to develop a professional game, academic curriculum is supposed to include all of the necessary subjects to foster leaders of the century. Figure 3 shows before conducting a professional game design or taking computer graphics course, students had better acquire the knowledge of digital art, modelling, rendering and animation, as well as the understanding of the impact of video game to the society [8]. Before the long trek, Alice could be the valuable vehicle to motivate students at the very early stage.
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Game Design Lineages: Minecraft’s Inventory

Game Design Lineages: Minecraft’s Inventory

In The Bard’s Tale, each character in the party is allowed eight items in their inventory – a number that facilitated selecting items using a single press of the number keys (the material constraint that informed this design). Equipped items were marked with an asterisk, and although an image of party members is shown the choices of items do not change that appearance (as they do in Minecraft). Despite being five years older, Wizardry’s inventory is almost identical, the one difference being the use of a question mark to indicate items that had not been identified, a player practice invented by D&D but largely maintained only in Rogue (Toy & Wichman 1980) and its descendants. Michael Cranford, the game designer and programmer at Interplay who was responsible for almost every aspect of The Bard’s Tale except its art, was not only playing Dungeons & Dragons at the tabletop (frequently as Dungeon Master,) but also playing a great deal of Wizardry (Crooked Bee 2013). Just as with Bell and Jaros’ Dungeon Master, Cranford wanted to create a ‘Wizardry Killer’, and with The Bard’s Tale achieved a streamlined perfection of the player practices of that earlier game, as well as bringing in a few of the new player practices TSR had added in Advanced Dungeons & Dragons (Gygax 1978), such as changing classes – itself a contribution from the player community.
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SCHOOL OF VISUAL ART AND DESIGN

SCHOOL OF VISUAL ART AND DESIGN

MART 581E  - New Media Advanced: Sound Art  (3 Credits)   Art and practice of sound art. Content varies by course title: 581A, Site-based and Installation Art; 581B, Mobile Platforms; 581C, Media Performance; 581D, Video Game Design; 581E, Sound Art. May be repeated as content varies by title up to 3 times.

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State-of-the-Art Model Driven Game Development: A Survey of Technological Solutions for Game-Based Learning

State-of-the-Art Model Driven Game Development: A Survey of Technological Solutions for Game-Based Learning

Game-based learning harnesses the advantages of computer games technology to create a fun, motivating and interactive virtual learning environment that promotes problem-based experiential learning. Such an approach is advocated by many commentators to provide an enhanced learning experience than those based on traditional didactic methods. However, the adoption of such a seductive learning method engenders a range of technical, educational and pedagogical challenges, including: (i) how to enable domain experts - with little computer games development skills – to plan, develop and update their teaching material without going through endless and laborious iterative cycles of software and content development and/or adaptation; (ii) how to choose the right mix of entertainment and game playing to deliver the required educational and pedagogical lesson/teaching material; and (iii) how to reuse existing games software frameworks and associated editing environments for game-based learning. Much research is already underway at addressing the stated challenges; however, these approaches do not address the key challenge of facilitating the planning and development of teaching material with the right mix of pedagogical elements, educational components and fun. Thus, this study aims to investigate the use of model-driven software engineering approaches to facilitate non-technical domain experts (teachers) to plan, develop and maintain game-based learning resources regardless of the intricacies of the game engine/environment (platform) used. This article investigates the state-of-the-art in model-driven game development to provide a summary of developments in game design languages, game software modelling languages, game models, game software models, model-driven game frameworks, game software frameworks, model-driven engineering tools and assistive user interfaces. The findings from this survey will prove a useful guide for future development of high-level educational game creation tools for game-based learning.
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The game design of a serious game about food waste

The game design of a serious game about food waste

The first part consists of two tests. The first test answered the question if the looks and feel are suited for the target audience. This was tested by using a digitalized paper- prototype, where the player can navigate through the game and see all the art that has been made. This digitalized paper-prototype was hosted online such that the participants could run it on their own device, just like the final game. The participants were instructed to run the prototype in full screen. In different scenes, some extra controls were added to allow for some extra actions. In the dining room with the king, the buttons G-H-J-K-L can be pressed, where J is the starting point with a neutral king. The other buttons give another emotion, K for example makes the king content. One step further, L, makes the king happy. Going back with the letters, slowly makes the king angry. At every emotion the button A can be pressed. When pressing the button A once, the king will talk to the participant. At the village square, the buttons Z-X-C-V-B-N can be pressed, starting at Z. That button gives no waste. Going up in the row of letters, more food waste will be visible, going back gives less waste. This little interactivity was created, to be able to show more of the art that had been created. However, the participant was not able to actually play the game, but that was not necessary for this test. This digitalized paper-prototype can be found in the link in appendix 7 and consists of some old art. The cookbook and the info screen are an earlier version and the prototype does not have the extra streets with their stores and the extra characters.
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Unstable Aesthetics: The Game Engine and Art Modifications.

Unstable Aesthetics: The Game Engine and Art Modifications.

In conjunction with van Waveren’s AI system, Carmack updated the Q3A engine with new networking capabilities based on a snapshot architecture that transmits data for each frame of gameplay from the server to client computers using a UDP (User Diagram Protocol). The server receives the updated gamestate at a fixed rate asynchronous with its clients. It then sends the current frame of gameplay to the client using delta encoding to limit bandwidth, or rather it excludes information from each frame, sending only disparities from the last frame downloaded from the client. Sanglard explains that Carmack designed the engine to run a virtual machine (referred to as a QVM) which loads three separate machines at any given time among the client- server. Here, a virtual machine refers to the emulation of a computer’s architecture. In the Q3A engine, two virtual machines operate on the client side of the network that communicate the current gamestate with each other. The “cgame” machine performs culling operations and runs the renderer library, while the “q3_ui” (user interface) operates menu phases in the game. The server side includes the “game” machine which triggers the bot library and run the game’s AI component (Figure 4.3). Carmack used a virtual machine for client-server operations because it afforded a more stable format for programmers when introducing new modifications. In August of 2005, Carmack released the id Tech 3 source code under the General Public License version 2, allowing for modding communities to develop derivative engines.
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Design Aspects of Scoring Systems in Game

Design Aspects of Scoring Systems in Game

In the Figure 5 and Figure 6, the perceptual maps present the distributions associated with the scoring systems in three-dimensional space (Table 6). For the sake of convenience, the researchers deconstructed the maps into two-di- mensional figures: first axis-second axis, first axis-third axis, and second axis- third axis (X, Y, and Z). The axes were designated according to their two most extreme points. A group of analysts, each equipped with five or more years of experience in game development, was then assembled to propose names for the axes according to differences between the two extreme points. Analyst 1 is the author of this paper and has experience developing multiple MMORPG at Softstar Entertainment. Analyst 2 is a game designer at Interserv International Corporation, and has developed Internet community games as well as game apps. Analyst 3 is a game designer at IGS and has developed many types of ar- cade games. Following in- depth discussion, a consensus was reached. The first axis involves the plot scoring system and the Pong scoring system, the main dif- ference between them being the perceivability. The two most extreme points on the second axis were the trade system and the timer system, with the greatest difference in controllability. The two most extreme points on the third axis were Top score system and the health system, which differed most in achievement. Thus, following a group discussion, the three axes were named Perceivability, Controllability, and Relation to Achievement.
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Re Design of a Serious Game for eHealth

Re Design of a Serious Game for eHealth

The choice has been made to improve the usability of the Stranded, because the existing game is currently being evaluated on usability with older adults and other target groups. It is part of an bigger project called IMI-Sprint. Improving the usability of the game contributes to a better UX. The term usability for this project is defined as follows: the extent to which Stranded can be used by older adults to increase their physical activity with effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction by regularly playing the game at home (Jokela et al., 2003). Usability evaluations is one of the disciplines used to design good user experiences and to see what users currently think of the game. During some evaluations for example it became quickly apparent that lots of usability problems are caused by the user interface (UI). A user interface or abbreviated as UI are the means that allow the user and game to interact with each other like e.g. buttons, icons, text navigation. The choice has therefore been made to definitely do a re-design of the UI. The UXD can be improved by enhancing usability, accessibility and pleasure. Although the choice is already made to improve usability, an often mentioned constraint is the lack of proper usability. Having proper usability should resolves almost any problem caused by the system and the mentioned user interface (Nap, H.H., de kort, Y.A.W., & Ijsselsteijn, W.A.,2009, Johnson, R. & Kent, S.,2007).
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Research Through Board Game Design

Research Through Board Game Design

Whilst the discussion of the benefits of using use of play as an activity within the context of academic research has been covered wide- ly (Coulton, 2015; Fullerton et al., 2004; Gobet et al., 2004; Bogost, 2007; Nacke et al., 2009; Abt, 1970; Coulton et al., 2016) what is less developed is how games can be designed to reveal the complexity of the underlying systems that can affect our lives. In particular, this research looks into the tensions of creating a board game that both delivers an underlying rhetoric, in this case related to personal data privacy, but is also still enjoyable to play. The initial research start- ed through a consideration of how best to characterise the types of interactions in physical and virtual spaces within the context of the Internet of Things (IoT). The resulting model (Akmal & Coulton, 2018) utilised philosophy as a lens to view these ‘spaces’, and provides a tool for establishing the nature of interactions that happen within them. The aim was to assist designers in making better informed decisions when designing new IoT products and services. Given the premise of the model was highly philosophical in nature, as it used theories established by Michel Foucault to create an epistemologi- cal ground to bridge these physical and digital spaces, this present- ed a challenge when imagining how the model might be used in practice. The board game began as a way to address this challenge. What follows is a discussion of the tension of designing a game that meets our research goals but also functions as a stand-alone game. Research through Design (RtD) was utilised as a methodology as it allows constant reflection through the iterative game design and play-testing and not only acted as a way to streamline the game, but also established a number of other avenues that reinforced the initial research. This paper presents and reflects on the different decisions that had to be made in order to satisfy both elements of the challenge; a designed artefact capable of expressing research material, as well as a designed artefact that is playable as a game. Games as a medium for persuasion
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AI-based game design patterns

AI-based game design patterns

A potential critique of most of the design patterns we present is that human players can replace the AI to produce a comparable or improved experience. Why not have people act as adversaries or be the targets for imitation? We are not claiming that AI agents can pass a game-based version of the Turing test and thereby provide new or improved play experiences. Rather, we believe that a serious consideration of the strengths and limitations of various AI techniques can be the foundation for new kinds of games. By using AI as the core of gameplay experiences we can leverage how people reason about other agents (e.g., adversaries, “people” to imitate, or creatures to raise) and create gameplay based around thinking about how agents work. Just as much as human puppeteers could play the roles of AI agents (consider Jason Rohrer’s Sleep Is Death that replaces a disembodied AI as Villain with a human), humans could also manually fill in the physics used in many 2D platformer games. By creating automated processes, gameplay can be based on the reliability of these underlying systems derived from their algorithmic structure. Designing games that use AI techniques in a new way as a core of their gameplay diversifies and enriches the role of artificial intelligence in games. This not only improves the breadth of the medium with new games and genres, but also opens up new research questions, as players begin to interact with software in novel ways. Developing AI-based games also pushes us to tackle existing research problems from a new, practical perspective. Building AI agents capable of taking over from absent players in online games or developing agents capable of assisting and enhancing the creativity of other players are research problems that are very relevant to the modern games industry. By building games in which these problems are approached as a question of game design, we can evaluate solutions directly, in contexts where the problem is the very focus of the player activity, rather than being one element in a much larger game. This might prove to be a new and effective lens through which to examine other problems in game AI research.
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EFM: A Model for Educational Game Design

EFM: A Model for Educational Game Design

Educational game can provide the virtual environment with specific targets and preset procedures to learners. Learners participate in the scenes, and challenge to spe- cific tasks with existing knowledge, skills and appropriate tools. They can get access to the feedback during the interaction with the environment, adjust their behaviors and go on playing with the incentive mechanism. In this period, learners will almost not notice that they are going through a learning process in an urgent rhythm, and also can not describe the relevant principles and motives of their own action. In fact, they have already learned some knowledge or skills. Obviously, the educational game is an edutainment environment, containing many essential conditions of effective learning environment. Through rational design, it will have the completely possibility to become an effective learning environment.
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COLLEGE OF ART & DESIGN TIMELINE

COLLEGE OF ART & DESIGN TIMELINE

Professor Turner retires, and Professor Marchita Mauck (art history) is appointed as interim associate dean of the college. The Office of Community Design & Development (OCDD) is established, and Professor Frank Bosworth is named director. Professor Zwirn returns to teaching, and Professor Theis is named interim director of the School of Architecture.

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State of the art mechanical design requires state of the art solutions.

State of the art mechanical design requires state of the art solutions.

Creo  and  Creo  Elements,  design  solutions  from  PTC  (Parametric  Technology  Corporation)  (1)  offer a solution for mechanical design without any compromises on functionality and tools. The  aim  of  the  software  is  to  enable  first  time  right  design.  In  first  time  right  design,  we  try  to  eliminate all errors preliminary to the first prototype or production. Therefore, a large  amount  of analysis tools are available in the design  tool, to ensure solid and secure engineering. As we  see  in  figure  1,  the  number  of  engineering  tools  available  in  the  design  solution  is  almost  unlimited. At the heart of it, is the design database, the CAD‐model. These data are reused in all  other applications to ensure data integrity and ease of use.  
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The Corporate Identity Game: A Simulation Game Involving Graphic Design Methodology

The Corporate Identity Game: A Simulation Game Involving Graphic Design Methodology

If the name "The Graphic Designer" had been maintained, it would have been necessary to broaden the scope of the game or at least the basic format to allow for the inclusion of design el[r]

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Pablo & The Artists: a mobile game for art education

Pablo & The Artists: a mobile game for art education

I tried to avoid long paragraphs for the children to read, instead I opted to use illustrations with shorter literal explanations, which is an established good practice commonly used in children's books. I also used Kristen as the main font, which looks fairly interesting, large, and is more spaced out than the others. A font size larger than 14 would be the norm of my design, and a font size of 16 or even 20 is also appropriate for readability. The buttons are all round-cornered and have down, up, disabled states that are fully responsive to a touch input. An another important aspect of the UI design is the styling of the elements. In the making of Pablo & the Artists, I used a consistent palette of warm colors ranged from bright yellow to gray brown. I stylized the input areas with a hand-drawn outline and applied a rough canvas texture around the boundary of those pop-ups (Fig. 18). The end result looks promising and works well during usage testing.
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Design Foundations for Emotional Game Characters

Design Foundations for Emotional Game Characters

At present, no one theory has been accepted over all others and psychologists are still determining how the known aspects of emotion fit together. For the purposes of a game, any coherent emotion model can be used, as long as it satisfies the designer’s needs for creating the player experience. Here we pursue psychoevolutionary synthesis (PES) to represent the internal emotion state, and cognitive appraisal (CA) to design an evaluation process for generating emotions from game world state data. Examining these two coherent, complementary models highlights a number of issues, such as the difference between affect—any influence on the mind, including reflexes and drives, which originates from the body—and emotion—specific affect categories comprised of multiple cognitive elements such as a subjective feeling state (Barrett and Bliss-Moreau 2009)—and identifies requirements that a game engine must fulfill. For video game purposes, designers have more design flexibility because the purpose is not necessarily to achieve correct behaviours so much as interesting behaviours. However, interesting behaviours should still be psychologically valid—grounded in human psychology—to make them plausible and more likely to be accepted by players (Broekens, Hudlicka, and Bidarra 2016). Some of the requirements are: NPCs should have prioritized goals, possess a world model that includes knowledge of events, characters and objects of the world, understand how the model affects their ability to achieve and maintain their goals, and know what actions they can take and their effects on the world.
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