The first UK-wide employer skills survey

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UK Commission’s employer skills survey 2011 : UK results

UK Commission’s employer skills survey 2011 : UK results

1 Introduction 1.1 The first UK-wide employer skills survey The UK Commission‟s Employer Skills Survey 2011 is the key UK data source on employer demand for and investment in skills. It is the first UK-wide employer skills survey and is also one of the largest employer skills surveys undertaken in the world with over 87,500 achieved interviews among large and small businesses in every sector. This ambitious and complex project has brought together the four surveys on skills deficiencies and training that were previously carried out separately in each constituent nation of the UK and represents a significant technical achievement. The previous Employer Skills Surveys conducted in the individual nations varied slightly in the population they covered 1 . This means that the results included in the main chapters of this evidence report are not directly comparable with previous skills surveys undertaken in the constituent nations. What we do get here for the first time however is comparable skills and employment data for employers across the entire UK. Where possible, throughout the narrative, an indication of how the 2011 figures relate to previous statistics will be provided, in particular to give some sense of what the impact of the current economic downturn has been on employer behaviour. However, for time series analysis on a comparable basis, readers should refer to Appendix A, which provides a set of core data tables that have been re-aggregated using the populations and weighting strategies previously used in each constituent nation of the UK. Further time series analysis for each nation will be released shortly in national reports.
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UK Employer Skills Survey 2011 : first findings

UK Employer Skills Survey 2011 : first findings

and effectively translating and sharing the key insights we find; international benchmarking and drawing insights from good practice abroad; high quality analysis which is leading edge, robust and action orientated; being responsive to immediate needs as well as taking a longer term perspective. We also work closely with key partners to ensure a co-ordinated approach to research and are proud to have delivered this survey, which represents a significant step forward in co-ordinating research and unifying services, on behalf of the four nations and our Commissioners.
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UK employer skills survey 2011 : first findings

UK employer skills survey 2011 : first findings

and effectively translating and sharing the key insights we find; international benchmarking and drawing insights from good practice abroad; high quality analysis which is leading edge, robust and action orientated; being responsive to immediate needs as well as taking a longer term perspective. We also work closely with key partners to ensure a co-ordinated approach to research and are proud to have delivered this survey, which represents a significant step forward in co-ordinating research and unifying services, on behalf of the four nations and our Commissioners.
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Employer Skills Survey 2015 : UK results

Employer Skills Survey 2015 : UK results

£1,130 in Wholesale and Retail to £2,320 in Electricity Gas and Water. And the proportion of establishments that trained to a qualification ranged from 43 per cent in Manufacturing to 65 per cent in Health & Social Work and in Education. Interestingly, there have been recent developments in the approaches undertaken by employers to develop their staff. The survey points to high and increasing use of e- learning and online training; this is now used by approaching half of employers that train, with recent users more than twice as likely to say its use had increased than to say its use had decreased. This suggests that employers are increasingly turning to innovative and flexible methods of training and developing their staff. This confirms wider research which points to an increase in online or distance learning in the UK. It is often promoted as a way for employers to deliver in house training to their staff, much of which can be done in work time, within the work environment and at the employees own pace, allowing them to gain accreditation and complete modules without having to travel away to training days. The literature also suggests a strong drive towards blended learning, a combination of online and face to face contact (The Economist, 2014).
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Employer Skills Survey 2015 : UK results

Employer Skills Survey 2015 : UK results

reporting an increase over the last 12 months, compared with 18 per cent using it less). Variation in training levels appear to be driven largely by employer size. The survey showed that the smallest establishments provided twice as many training days per person trained and spend, on average, three and a half times more per person trained than the largest establishments. Reflecting these patterns, businesses in Construction and Agriculture spend more per person trained than sectors dominated by larger establishments, such as Public Administration and Health and Social Work. This suggests that smaller businesses are less likely to benefit from economies of scale in the planning and implementation of training than their larger counterparts. This is particularly true of small, single site businesses:
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Employer Skills Survey 2015 : UK results

Employer Skills Survey 2015 : UK results

Establishments were not pre-notified that they would be called for the survey, partly due to financial considerations (the cost of writing to over 650,000 establishments being prohibitive) and partly because it was felt that this could lead to a reduction in response rates in the survey owing to head offices potentially opting out for all of the establishments in their organisation. An exception was made for certain large banks, where head offices were contacted by members of the UKCES team prior to the survey commencing in order to obtain telephone numbers at branch level for establishments included in the sample drawn from the Experian database. This approach was taken as the original telephone numbers supplied in the Experian sample directed interviewers to call centres from where, based on past experiences of the Employer Skills Surveys and Employer Perspective Surveys, it has proved particularly challenging to reach individual branches.
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UK Commission’s employer skills survey 2011: Wales results

UK Commission’s employer skills survey 2011: Wales results

Mid Wales stands out on a number of measures. As noted when discussing regional breakdowns, the size distribution of sectors across Wales is uneven, and the concentration of small establishments in Mid Wales should be borne in mind. Despite having the highest levels of skill-shortage vacancies, and the lowest levels of training, employers in Mid Wales were no more likely to report having staff who were not proficient at their jobs than the other regions in Wales. This could be because employers in this region, knowing they do not have the capacity or budget to train staff, are more selective about who they employ thus skill deficiencies in the region present themselves as skill- shortage vacancies, rather than taking people on who are not sufficiently skilled and causing a skills gap. It could however be indicative that employers in the region are less aware of employees skills needs and issues have passed unidentified. The survey findings can only report those employers that are aware of the skills gaps they face, and other evidence of a low-skill equilibrium within the UK (for example see the original paper on this subject by Finegold and Soskice, 1988) suggests that many employers not registering problems may be doing so because of a lack of desire to build up skills, innovate, grow and move up the value chain. Hence the survey results on the extent of skills gaps, in combination with the evidence that, for example, establishments in this region are the least likely to have annual review for staff or processes in place to identify talent supports this latter hypothesis.
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UK Commission’s employer skills survey 2011: Scotland results

UK Commission’s employer skills survey 2011: Scotland results

The scale and scope of data collected by the UK Commission’s Employer Skills Survey 2011 means that it is a valuable research resource supporting detailed and complex statistical analysis of the inter-relationships between employer characteristics, and their practices and experiences. The findings presented in this report have been produced through a more descriptive exploration of the data. The large base sizes on which the all-Scotland findings are based mean that we can have a good degree of confidence in the patterns that we describe; however as mentioned above subgroup analysis is limited due to smaller sample sizes and this document should not be read as a statistical report. A table showing confidence intervals is shown in Appendix E to give some indicative guidance as to what can be considered a “significant” difference at sub-group level. Throughout the report unweighted base figures are shown on tables and charts to give an indication of the statistical reliability of the figures. These figures are always based on the number of establishments answering a question, as this is the information required to determine statistical reliability. Therefore, where percentages are based on “all vacancies”, the base figure quoted is the number of establishments with vacancies.
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UK Commission’s Employer Skills Survey 2011: England results

UK Commission’s Employer Skills Survey 2011: England results

The scale and scope of data collected by the UK Commission’s Employer Skills Survey 2011 means that it is a valuable research resource supporting detailed and complex statistical analysis of the inter-relationships between employer characteristics, and their practices and experiences. The findings presented in this report have been produced through a more descriptive exploration of the data. The large base sizes on which most of the findings are based mean that we can have a good degree of confidence in the patterns that we describe; the document should not be read as a statistical report, however. A table showing confidence intervals is shown in Appendix G to give some indicative guidance as to what can be considered a “significant” difference at sub-group level. Throughout the report unweighted base figures are shown on tables and charts to give an indication of the statistical reliability of the figures. These figures are always based on the number of establishments answering a question, as this is the information required to determine statistical reliability. Therefore, where percentages are based on
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UK Commission’s Employer Skills Survey 2013 : UK results, January 2014

UK Commission’s Employer Skills Survey 2013 : UK results, January 2014

The survey reveals a sharp rise in skills shortages which may be holding back the UK’s economic recovery. This is not a new phenomenon. Such deficiencies have persisted over time in some sectors and occupations indicating that there is a need to take decisive action. At the same time as a growing shortage of certain skills there is also evidence of a surplus and mismatch in other areas, with the survey finding that almost half of employers report having staff with skills and qualifications beyond those required for their current job. There are also indications of pressures on skills investment. For example, the amount spent on training has fallen by £2.5 billion since 2011. The survey also questions whether UK employers are being ambitious enough when it comes to both investing in their people and their broader business strategies.
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UK Commission's employer skills survey 2011 : Northern Ireland results

UK Commission's employer skills survey 2011 : Northern Ireland results

83 Figure 4.6 Incidence of skill-shortage vacancies and/or skill gap by region 4.6 Conclusions This chapter addresses the skill gaps, which exist when employees are not fully proficient at their job. Only a minority of employers experience skills gaps, but where they do this has a significant impact. In 2011, skill gaps affected 12 per cent of establishments and five per cent of the workforce in Northern Ireland. The overall incidence of skill gaps has declined since between 2008 and 2011 by all three measures. The incidence of skill gaps appears to have declined at the overall level, but this does not necessarily mean that the workers are better at their jobs today. Due to the recession, establishments may less like to innovate in their working practices, to introduce new technology or to develop new products or services. Since technological change is an important cause of skill gaps, the decline seen since 2008 may reflect lower investment by employers in innovation rather than an improvement in proficiency of the workforce. The decline in the incidence of skill gaps could also reflect selective downsizing by organisations: employers may be more likely to lay off a worker who is not fully proficient than one who is.
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Employer Skills Survey 2015:
Wales Report

Employer Skills Survey 2015: Wales Report

arguably employers should not only consider the skills their employees need now but also those that they will need in future. 7.18 Smarter training strategies. Key reasons for non-training and not training more included lack of funds and lack of time. One way to address these issues is greater use of online training or e-learning, currently offered by a significant minority of employers in Wales and expected to increase over time. E-learning was not necessarily delivered at the expense of other more traditional routes, as off-the-job training had also increased since 2013. This pattern suggests that employers can successfully diversify their approach to training and/or offer flexibility in learning modes to meet employee needs.
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Employer skills survey 2013 : Wales report

Employer skills survey 2013 : Wales report

people through measuring how many employers recruit people directly from school, FE colleges or Higher Education into their first job, and examining how well prepared these new labour market entrants have been. However for the first time this year the survey looked at the more general recruitment of adults under 25, including those for whom the position was not their first job after leaving education. The recruitment of young people was covered by the UKCES Employer Perspectives Survey 2012; UKCESS13 builds on these questions and allows for a larger sample size. The questions regarding the recruitment of young people (under 25) were modular questions in ESS 2013 and as such were only asked to half of the sample. Questions on the
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Employer Perspectives Survey 2014: UK results

Employer Perspectives Survey 2014: UK results

In terms of importance, work experience was followed by candidates having Maths and English GCSE (A*-C grade), which was deemed to be ‘critical or significant’ by 57 per cent of UK employers. The survey shows therefore that employers tend to value work experience and core skills as most important when recruiting, which has important implications for policy makers. However, the survey also found that around half of all employers also said that academic and vocational qualifications were ‘critical or significant’ when recruiting too. And what’s more, when we look over time at previous survey results we find that the importance attached to both academic and vocational qualifications has increased. This indicates that employers are becoming more demanding over time when recruiting staff, which has clear implications for young people in particular, and especially those accessing employment for the first time. It is particularly important that labour market entrants are equipped with core skills, experience of the workplace and appropriate social skills in order to secure entry to employment.
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Employer Perspectives Survey 2014: UK results

Employer Perspectives Survey 2014: UK results

Executive Summary Introduction This report presents findings from the 2014 UK Commission Employer Perspectives Survey (EPS), the third biennial survey in this series. It provides insight into the thoughts and behaviour of over 18,000 employers across the UK as they make decisions about how to engage with training providers, schools, colleges and individuals in the wider skills system, to get the skills they need. Key areas covered in this report include: training; work experience; collaboration with schools, colleges and universities; Apprenticeships and recruitment, including of young and old people.
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Employer Perspectives Survey 2014: UK results

Employer Perspectives Survey 2014: UK results

I’m writing to let you know about the UK Commission’s Employer Perspectives Survey, which will start fieldwork interviews early in summer 2014. The UKCES is a publicly funded, industry led organisation providing strategic leadership on skills and employment issues across the UK. Our employer surveys are long standing research tools which support the development of government policy and help inform strategic economic plans at a local level. It is crucial to the success of the Employer Perspectives Survey that organisations like [COMPANY NAME] take part, so that the findings accurately reflect the views of businesses both large and small.
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National Employer Skills Survey for England 2009 : key findings report

National Employer Skills Survey for England 2009 : key findings report

Skills that need improving or updating Employers who identified the need to upskill at least one employee in the next 12 months were then given a range of categories listing types of skills. They were asked which types of skills would need to be improved amongst the single occupation that they felt would be most affected by the need for upskilling. Across all occupation types, the skills that are most likely to need improving or updating in relation to upskilling were technical, practical and job-specific skills, mentioned by 63 per cent of employers who said that they needed to upskill at least one employee over the next 12 months. In some occupational groups such as managers, administration and secretarial roles, and sales and customer service staff, mentions of technical, practical and job-specific skills were less common than average, but skills were mentioned which could be regarded as job-specific for that occupational group (managerial skills for managers, customer-handling skills for sales and customer services staff and general IT user skills for administrative staff).
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Europeans and mobility: first results of an EU-wide survey

Europeans and mobility: first results of an EU-wide survey

EU citizens are also confident that the Union has lifted most administrative barriers for those who wish to find a job in another EU country. When asked about the difficulties they would expect to encounter if they wanted to move to anoth- er Member State, EU citizens first quote a lack of language skills (approximately 50%), or the difficulty in adapting to a different culture (20%). Relatively few (less than 15%) quote access to social protection or social services as potential bar- riers, and less than 10% of them believe that they would have Fig. 1: Proportion of people who have moved outside their
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The UK Life in Recovery Survey 2015 : the first national UK survey of addiction recovery experiences

The UK Life in Recovery Survey 2015 : the first national UK survey of addiction recovery experiences

35 The UK Life in Recovery survey provides further evidence that there is a sizeable recovery population who are available to participate in research projects that aim to advance the cause of recovery. We can say nothing about how representative our sample group is or what percentage of the UK recovery population they represent although we have participation and engagement from a wide range of recovery organisations across the UK. The UK ethnic minority population is underrepresented in this survey sample, as are recovering persons in the prison population and those from the younger recovery community. Exploring the recovery experiences of individuals in minority communities in particular remains under researched and future work is necessary in order to build a more complete picture of the UK recovery community as a whole. However, this project is a critical step in establishing a baseline for recovery experiences in the UK that will be built on with future surveys, both internationally and in the UK.
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Skills at work in Britain: First findings from the Skills and Employment Survey 2012

Skills at work in Britain: First findings from the Skills and Employment Survey 2012

Thus the issue for policy is that, while existing businesses are making better use of publicly supported education than in the past, the upskilling of jobs which has characterised the last twenty years is slowing down. Since the economy’s prosperity is based on the skills of its jobs, it is on ensuring that this slowdown does not turn into a long-term reversal of the upskilling trends of the 1986-2006 period that policy-makers should concentrate most. More may need to be done to challenge some employers to ratchet up their skill demands. It is an oft-stated ambition for Britain to become a leader in its stock of skilled labour, but to make the most effective use of the skills produced policies to raise skills demand alongside supply are also required.
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