the Theory of Shadows

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The Theory of Falling Shadows Applied to

The Theory of Falling Shadows Applied to 𝑑 Ideals in 𝑑 Algebras

generalizes the concept of fuzzy subalgebra to a much larger class of functions in a natural way. In addition, they discussed a method of fuzzification of a wide class of algebraic systems onto 0, 1 along with some consequences. Jun et al. 13 discussed implicative ideals of BCK- algebras based on the fuzzy sets and the theory of falling shadows. Also, Jun et al. 14 used the theory of a falling shadow for considering falling d-subalgebras, falling d-ideals, falling d # -ideals, and falling BCK-ideals in d-algebras.

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Implicative Ideals of BCK Algebras Based on  the Fuzzy Sets and the Theory of Falling Shadows

Implicative Ideals of BCK Algebras Based on the Fuzzy Sets and the Theory of Falling Shadows

Based on the theory of falling shadows and fuzzy sets, the notion of a falling fuzzy implicative ideal of a BCK-algebra is introduced. Relations among falling fuzzy ideals, falling fuzzy implicative ideals, falling fuzzy positive implicative ideals, and falling fuzzy commutative ideals are given. Relations between fuzzy implicative ideals and falling fuzzy implicative ideals are provided.

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Dancing with Learning: Ghosts and Shadows

Dancing with Learning: Ghosts and Shadows

In the western sense community is about sharing similar beliefs while residing in the same place and respecting differences in values and ways of life. (Carlson, Keith Thor. The Power of Place, the Problem of Time: Aboriginal Identity and Historical Consciousness in the Cauldron of Colonialism (2010) University of Toronto Press). The second part of the term is curriculum. Curriculum also has its origins from the Latin and is described as the action of running, course of action, race (competition). (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/curriculum). Typically the term is associated with schools and their programs of study. Kerr defines curriculum as, „all the learning that is planned and guided by the school, whether it is carried on in groups or individually inside or outside the school.‟ (Kelly, A.V. (1983; 1999.) The curriculum. Theory and Practise, 4e, London; Paul Chapman) (http://www.infed.org\biblio\b.curric.htm). As Aoki states, it is truly a tool for managing schools and ensures that what the government decides is going to be taught is taught.
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Lights and Shadows in the Evolution of Language

Lights and Shadows in the Evolution of Language

In an insightful link in volume I, Hurford puts forward the connection bet- ween the ventral and dorsal neural pathways, and predicate–argument structure respectively (a connection already suggested by Jackendoff & Landau 1992: 121– 123). In a nutshell, the dorsal pathway (‘where-stream’) is said to identify the location of an object; the ventral pathway (‘what-stream’) gives all the properties necessary to identify it. External objects delivered by the dorsal stream are given individual variables (x, y, z); categorical judgments about objects’ properties are delivered by the ventral stream and considered predicates (red, cat, Mary). Additionally, two types of psychological attention take part in this process: global attention delivers one-place judgments about the whole scene, while local attention delivers one-place judgments about the objects within each scene; the two processes, global and local, operate in parallel. The notation Hurford pro- poses follows that of the Discourse Representation Theory (Kamp & Reyle 1993) regarding the use of boxes; he depicts each one containing the conflated information of both the dorsal and the ventral stream through the two attentional processes; e.g., FLY - SMALL (local attention), or FLY FLY - SMALL (global and local).
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Shadows silence

Shadows silence

Monika Kostera is Professor in Management and Organization Theory at Warsaw University. She has been a visiting professor and visiting researcher at a number of various institutions such as Utrecht University of Humanist Studies, Erasmus University in Rotterdam, Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin, Lund University. She has published several books and chapters, edited books, and has been the guest editor of one special issue of Studies in Cultures, Organizations and Societies. She has published over 20 articles in refereed journals such as: Organization; Management Learning; Studies in Cultures, Organizations, and Societies; Qualitative Sociology; Organization Studies; Human Resource Development International; Journal of Organizational Behavior; Scandinavian Journal of Management, and others. She is a member of editorial boards of several journals, among them: Human Relations; Management Learning; Tamara. Her current research interests are: ethnography of NGOs, aesthetics and spirituality of organizing, critical perspectives management in East European countries.
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Dancing with Learning: Ghosts and Shadows

Dancing with Learning: Ghosts and Shadows

In the western sense community is about sharing similar beliefs while residing in the same place and respecting differences in values and ways of life. (Carlson, Keith Thor. The Power of Place, the Problem of Time: Aboriginal Identity and Historical Consciousness in the Cauldron of Colonialism (2010) University of Toronto Press). The second part of the term is curriculum. Curriculum also has its origins from the Latin and is described as the action of running, course of action, race (competition). (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/curriculum). Typically the term is associated with schools and their programs of study. Kerr defines curriculum as, „all the learning that is planned and guided by the school, whether it is carried on in groups or individually inside or outside the school.‟ (Kelly, A.V. (1983; 1999.) The curriculum. Theory and Practise, 4e, London; Paul Chapman) (http://www.infed.org\biblio\b.curric.htm). As Aoki states, it is truly a tool for managing schools and ensures that what the government decides is going to be taught is taught.
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PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF THE PSYCHOSOCIAL THEORY: EXAMINING THE ROLE OF THE SCHOOL IN PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT.

PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF THE PSYCHOSOCIAL THEORY: EXAMINING THE ROLE OF THE SCHOOL IN PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT.

Development in humans is characterised by such domains as physical development, cognitive development, emotional development, social development and personality development. This paper focuses on the domain of personality development. There are at least two common theories that have been used to explain personality development. These are the psychosexual theory and the psychosocial theory. The psychosexual theory was advocated by Sigmund Freud, whereas the psychosocial theory was advanced by Erik Erikson. The paper therefore focuses on Erik Erikson’s eight stages of the psychosocial theory which are then used to explain personality development at Early Childhood Development (ECD) level. The paper discusses the relevance of the theory to education and how an appreciation of the theory can contribute to a better personality development. This was done through examining the role of the school in the development of the child. The paper concludes that the relevance of Erikson’s psychosocial theory is found in its emphasis on the development of the ego and the relevance of life experiences in developing personality.
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An Introduction to Formal Language Theory that Integrates Experimentation and Proof   Allen Stoughton pdf

An Introduction to Formal Language Theory that Integrates Experimentation and Proof Allen Stoughton pdf

In Forlan, the usual objects of formal language theory—automata, reg- ular expressions, grammars, labeled paths, parse trees, etc.—are defined as abstract types, and have concrete syntax. The standard algorithms of formal language theory are implemented in Forlan, including conversions between different kinds of automata and grammars, the usual operations on automata and grammars, equivalence testing and minimization of deter- ministic finite automata, etc. Support for the variant of the programming language Lisp that we use (instead of Turing machines) as a universal pro- gramming language is planned.
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Diffusion in General Physics and the Theory of the Convective Diffusion

Diffusion in General Physics and the Theory of the Convective Diffusion

According to (7), Onsager’s model diffusion in the concentrated liquid mixtures presents the motion of the components, which are mutually rubbed with. the force[r]

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Advanced Complexity Theory Lctn   Madhu Sudan pdf

Advanced Complexity Theory Lctn Madhu Sudan pdf

ekbi ml!niHpoHTD@qrjnrj n@qYstnT.[r]

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Algorithm and Complexity Lctn   Herbert S  Wilf pdf

Algorithm and Complexity Lctn Herbert S Wilf pdf

Selection by the instructor of topics of interest will be very important, because normally I’ve found that I can’t cover anywhere near all of this material in a semester. A reasonable choice for a first try might be to begin with Chapter 2 (recursive algorithms) which contains lots of motivation. Then, as new ideas are needed in Chapter 2, one might delve into the appropriate sections of Chapter 1 to get the concepts and techniques well in hand. After Chapter 2, Chapter 4, on number theory, discusses material that is extremely attractive, and surprisingly pure and applicable at the same time. Chapter 5 would be next, since the foundations would then all be in place. Finally, material from Chapter 3, which is rather independent of the rest of the book, but is strongly connected to combinatorial algorithms in general, might be studied as time permits.
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Complexity of Algorithms Lctn    Peter Gacs pdf

Complexity of Algorithms Lctn Peter Gacs pdf

We restrict the computational tasks to yes-or-no problems; this is not too much of a restric- tion, and pays off in what we gain simplicity of presentation. Note that the task of computing any output can be broken down to computing its bits in any reasonable binary representation. Most of this chapter is spent on illustrating how certain computational tasks can be solved within given resource contraints. We start with the most important case, and show that most of the basic everyday computational tasks can be solved in polynomial time. These basic tasks include tasks in number theory (arithmetic operations, greatest common divisor, modular arithmetic) linear algebra (Gaussian elimination) and graph theory. (We cannot in any sense survey all the basic algorithms, especially in graph theory; we’ll restrict ourselves to a few that will be needed later.
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An Introduction to the Theory of Computation   Eitan Gurari pdf

An Introduction to the Theory of Computation Eitan Gurari pdf

One of the nondeterministic instructions is an assignment instruction of the form "y := ?"; the other is a looping instruction of the form "do or until " An input of a given program is a[r]

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Computational Complexity A Conceptual Perspective   Oded Goldreich pdf

Computational Complexity A Conceptual Perspective Oded Goldreich pdf

Another major choice is the use of asymptotic analysis. Specically, we con- sider the complexity of an algorithm as a function of its input length, and study the asymptotic behavior of this function. It turns out that structure that is hidden by concrete quantities appears at the limit. Furthermore, depending on the case, we classify functions according to dierent criteria. For example, in case of time complexity we consider classes of functions that are closed under multiplication, whereas in case of space complexity we consider closure under addition. In each case, the choice is governed by the nature of the complexity measure being consid- ered. Indeed, one could have developed a theory without using these conventions, but this would have resulted in a far more cumbersome theory. For example, rather than saying that nding a satisfying assignment for a given formula is polynomial- time reducible to deciding the satisability of some other formulae, one could have stated the exact functional dependence of the complexity of the search problem on the complexity of the decision problem.
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Introduction to the Theory of Computation, Second Edition pdf

Introduction to the Theory of Computation, Second Edition pdf

SUMMARY OF MATHEMATICAL TERMS A finite set of objects called symbols An input to a function A relation whose domain is a set of pairs An operation on Boolean values The values TRUE or FA[r]

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Introduction to Complexity Theory Lecture Notes   Oded Goldreich pdf

Introduction to Complexity Theory Lecture Notes Oded Goldreich pdf

The second theory (cf., [16, 17]), due to Solomonov [22], Kolmogorov [15] and Chaitin [3], is rooted in computability theory and specically in the notion of a universal language (equiv., universal machine or computing device). It measures the complexity of objects in terms of the shortest program (for a xed universal machine) which generates the object. Like Shannon's the- ory, Kolmogorov Complexity is quantitative and perfect random objects appear as an extreme case. Interestingly, in this approach one may say that a single object, rather than a distribution over ob- jects, is perfectly random. Still, Kolmogorov's approach is inherently intractable (i.e., Kolmogorov Complexity is uncomputable), and { by denition { one cannot generate strings of high Kolmogorov Complexity from short random seeds.
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Essentials of Theoretical Computer Science   F  D  Lewis pdf

Essentials of Theoretical Computer Science F D Lewis pdf

Proof. This is very easy indeed. With a universal Turing machine we can simulate any finite automaton. To decide whether it accepts an input we need just watch it for a number of steps equal to the length of that input. So far, so good. In order to decide things a bit more intricate than membership though, we need a very useful technical lemma which seems very strange indeed until we begin to use it. It is one of the most important results in finite automata theory and it provides us with a handle on the finiteness of finite automata. It tells us that only the information stored in the states of a finite automaton is available during computation. (This seems obvious, but the proof of the following lemma points this out in a very powerful manner.)
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ELEMENTARY RECURSION THEORY AND ITS APPLICATIONS TO FORMAL SYSTEMS   Saul Kripke pdf

ELEMENTARY RECURSION THEORY AND ITS APPLICATIONS TO FORMAL SYSTEMS Saul Kripke pdf

decoded, since every number has a unique prime factorization, and intuitively the decoding function is computable. If we had exponentiation as a primitive of RE, it would be quite easy to see that the decoding function is recursive; but we do not have it as a primitive. Although Gödel did not take exponentiation as primitive, he found a trick, using the Chinese Remainder Theorem, for carrying out the above coding with only addition, multiplication and successor as primitive. We could easily have taken exponentiation as a primitive — it is not essential to recursion theory that the language of RE have only successor, addition and multiplication as primitive and other operations as defined. If we had taken it as primitive, our proof of the easy half of Church's thesis, i.e. that all r.e. relations are semi-computable, would still have gone through, since exponentiation is clearly a computable function. Similarly, we could have added to RE new variables to range over finite sets of numbers, or over finite sequences. In fact, doing so might have saved us some time at the beginning of the course. However, it is traditional since Gödel’s work to take quantification over
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Computational Complexity A Modern Approach   Sanjeev Arora pdf

Computational Complexity A Modern Approach Sanjeev Arora pdf

At this point, the reader is probably thinking of familiar games such as Chess, Go, Checkers etc. and wondering whether complexity theory may help differentiate between them—for example, to justify the common intu- ition that Go is more difficult than Chess. Unfortunately, formalizing these issues in terms of asymptotic complexity is tricky because these are finite games, and as far as the existence of a winning strategy is concerned, there are at most three choices: Player 1 has has a winning strategy, Player 2 does, or neither does (they can play to a draw). However, one can study general- izations of these games to an n × n board where n is arbitrarily large —this may involve stretching the rules of the game since the definition of chess seems tailored to an 8 × 8 board— and then complexity theory can indeed by applied. For most common games, including chess, determining which player has a winning strategy in the n × n version is PSPACE-complete (see [?]or [?]). Note that if NP 6= PSPACE then in general there is no short certificate for exhibiting that either player in the TQBF game has a winning strategy, which is alluded to in Evens and Tarjan’s quote at the start of the chapter.
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Charles Petzold Annotated Turing Wiley(2008) pdf

Charles Petzold Annotated Turing Wiley(2008) pdf

David Bolter is called Turing's Man University of North Caroline Press, 1984, and Brian Rotman's critique of traditional mathematical concepts of infinity Ad lrifinitum Stanford Universi[r]

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