8 to 6 inch

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22 lbs. (10,0 Kg) 4 Inch (DN100) 45 lbs. (20,4 Kg) 6 Inch (DN lbs. (30,9 Kg) 8 Inch (DN200) 129 lbs. (58,6 Kg)

22 lbs. (10,0 Kg) 4 Inch (DN100) 45 lbs. (20,4 Kg) 6 Inch (DN lbs. (30,9 Kg) 8 Inch (DN200) 129 lbs. (58,6 Kg)

Step 1. Notify the proper authorities and all personnel who may be affected that an alarm test is to be performed. Step 2. Open the end-of-line Inspec- tor’s Test Connection (or Alarm Test Valve, if acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction) and verify that the system alarms operate in accordance with the requirements of the authority having jurisdiction. Verify that the wa- ter motor alarm and/or the pressure alarm switch properly actuate and within the elapsed time required by the authority having jurisdiction. Step 3. Verify that water is flowing out of the alarm line drain at a rate consis- tent with the 1/8 inch (3,2 mm) diame- ter drain orifice in the Restriction As- sembly.
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Improving Field Service Productivity & Profitability With Mobile Automation Tools

Improving Field Service Productivity & Profitability With Mobile Automation Tools

processing. The key printer performance criteria for field service are durability, battery life and interface flexibility so the printer can be used with mobile computers, cell phones, bar code readers and other devices. Thermal printers provide operating cost advantages compared to other technologies. One Zebra customer performed an analysis to compare the costs of legacy 8.5-by-11 inch invoices used in its field operations with a 4-by-6 inch invoice produced on a Zebra mobile thermal printer. The thermal media cost was measured at 2.7¢ per invoice, compared to 6¢ for full sheets used in inkjet or impact printers—making the thermal media 45 percent less expensive. Companies that use multi-part forms could save even more.
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LOW-HEAD RECIRCULATING AQUACULTURE SYSTEM FOR JUVENILE RED DRUM PRODUCTION. Timothy Pfeiffer* 1, and Paul Wills 2

LOW-HEAD RECIRCULATING AQUACULTURE SYSTEM FOR JUVENILE RED DRUM PRODUCTION. Timothy Pfeiffer* 1, and Paul Wills 2

The system consists of four dual-drain, round fiberglass tanks 10 feet in diameter and 3.5 feet in depth for a total tank volume of approximately 2055 gallons. A sump 15 inches in diameter by 10 inches deep is in the center of each tank. The sump is covered by a 3-inch diameter slotted standpipe with a PVC bottom plate allowing approximately a gap of 0.25-inches around the sump. The plate also has radial 0.25-inch slots for water and solids to enter. The standpipe is fitted into a 3-inch diameter bulkhead at the bottom of the sump that provides mid-column water flow to the torus filter. Each tank torus filter is filled with 13ft 3 of MB3™ floating plastic media. Water flow into the filters is air-lifted through a 4-inch diameter approach pipe using a 0.75-inch diameter airline located near the bottom of the pipe into the filter. Water flow through the filters is approximately 30- 35 gpm and the filtered water returns back to the tank by gravity. A 3-inch diameter pipe with ball valve is plumbed into the sump for purging of accumulated solids from the sump. A 1-ft wide x 2-ft long x 2-ft deep tank sidebox with a 4-inch diameter opening at the bottom is used for surface water removal from the tanks into a 6-inch diameter drain line manifold. Surface water out of the sidebox flows to the system drum filter (Model 801, WMT, Baton Rouge, LA). A 40 micron screen is used on the drum filter which is in line before the 10-ft x 10-ft x 4-ft sump. The custom fabricated sump is divided into five compartments, four which hold media (~40 ft 3 of MB3™ media) and is aerated to keep the media moving. Water flows through the four 2-ft x 8-ft compartments before reaching the last compartment (2-ft x 10-ft). A 2-hp propeller pump is used to return the water to the tanks. Flow from the propeller pump is separated to a low-head counter cross-flow (LHCCF) oxygenator (approximately 150-200 gpm) and return flow to the tanks (200 - 240 gpm). Liquid oxygen flows into the LHCCF oxygenator at 5 Lpm per unit. Each LHCC tower is 2-ft wide x 6-ft high x 2-ft deep. Water flow into the top of each tower at the top is controlled by a 3-inch ball valve and flows through four distribution plated before returning to the sump. Each 2-ft x 2-ft distribution plate has forty 3/8-inch holes for water dispersion. Liquid oxygen is injected into the tower at the bottom and passes through the plates in a zigzag counter flow to the water movement. LOX volume into the towers is controlled by a flow meter with an adjustable valve. Additional LOX is added to the tanks using 12-inch ultra-fine bubble diffusers and controlled with 0-5 scfm acrylic flowmeters. A schematic of this system is presented in Figure 7.
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7100 04703 B Drive 6MB Service Jun83 pdf

7100 04703 B Drive 6MB Service Jun83 pdf

Corvus Disk Drive Product Line A-Series Drives 8-Inch II-Megabyte drive Revision A B-Series Drives 8-Inch II-Megabyte drive Revision B 8-Inch 20-Megabyte drive Revision B S.2S-Inch 6-Meg[r]

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Keys to Pests in and Around the Home

Keys to Pests in and Around the Home

Cluster Flies: 3/8 inch long, dark gray, non- metallic flies. Sluggish fliers, not related to garbage or manure. Larvae parasites of earthworms. May suddenly appear indoors around windows or lamps in the fall, spring or winter. Adults enter homes in late August to overwinter and occupy attics and/or wall voids that are warmed by winter sun exposure (most often southern)

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3M 8432 20mb 8 Inch Disk Drive Product Specification Jan83 pdf

3M 8432 20mb 8 Inch Disk Drive Product Specification Jan83 pdf

Write Data Mode Figure 9.3.3 In the Write Data Mode Write Gate must be delayed two bytes after Data ECC to insure that all of the host write data is clocked out of the write pre-compensa[r]

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HOUSTON MOTORSPORTS PARK 2011 NASCAR LATE MODEL RULES

HOUSTON MOTORSPORTS PARK 2011 NASCAR LATE MODEL RULES

The distributor, tachometer, coil, and switched ignition wires must pass through a 6-conductor “weatherpack” connector within 6 inches of the main ignition box (MSD, Crane, Etc). The tachometer wire and the distributor wire must be covered with a braided or solid metallic overlay sufficiently dense to absorb all electro-magnetic impulses created by the ignition system. Aluminum foil or foil backed wire molding are not acceptable. Both braided overlays must have a ground wire attached to the roll cage or frame, not sheet metal or aluminum. The braided overlay will extend the full distance between connectors on both wires. Any type of connector may be used for tach and distributor ends, but must be within 6 inches of the tach or distributor.
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Measurements of Freestream Fluctuations in the NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel

Measurements of Freestream Fluctuations in the NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel

For researchers and other customers of the facility, knowledge of the magnitude and distribution of freestream flow quantities is important for knowing where to place a model. In studying transition, these quantities are particularly important to know because the mechanisms that cause transition to occur on a test article may be affected by the freestream disturbance environment. 1, 5–7 Simulations have started to advance so that they can incorporate knowledge of the in-flow parameters to determine the initial amplitude of instabilities in the boundary layer. 8 Amplitude-based prediction models will also require some knowledge of the spectral content of these freestream disturbances. 9 Thus, it has been necessary to try to quantify these freestream components to better understand the necessary inputs into our current transition models.
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Crossbows By Harrold Hoffman (Action Book Publishers) pdf

Crossbows By Harrold Hoffman (Action Book Publishers) pdf

We can make a very good brass pile (point for target shooting) quite simply from 5\16-inch outside diameter brass tubing of twenty-six gauge. It has a short length of 9/32-inch brass rod sweated into the front end with solder. Cut a one-inch length of tubing and a 1\2-inch length of rod, After cleaning carefully with emery cloth to obtain a bright metal surface on both metal parts, smear them with flux. Then, heat it with a propane torch, and when they are sufficiently hot, coat the rod with solder. Before the solder cools, insert two thirds of the rod into the tube and leave to cool. Most Archery shops will have ready-made points that you can install, and they will all be the same weight.
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Across the Fence Five Ingredients or Less Recipes June 2014

Across the Fence Five Ingredients or Less Recipes June 2014

Preheat oven to 350°F. Place 8 large custard cups onto a baking sheet. Chop chilled cookie dough into ¼-inch cubes and set aside. Mix the rhubarb with the sugar, cinnamon, and lemon juice, if desired. Fill each of the custard cups half full with the rhubarb mixture. Spoon the strawberry pie filling over the rhubarb. Arrange the cubed cookie dough on top of the filling. Leave some open spaces between the cubes, so that the filling does not overflow when baking. There may be some dough left over. Bake in preheated oven until the dough is fully cooked and starting to brown around the edges, about 45 minutes. Note : Use leftover dough to make cookies.
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Design and testing of a 6 inch control Valve with a Multi stage Anti cavitation trim

Design and testing of a 6 inch control Valve with a Multi stage Anti cavitation trim

Physical Meaning Pressure Inlet pressure Outlet pressure Vapor pressure Critical thermodynamic pressure Pressure at the vena contracta Density Density inlet Density outlet Density water [r]

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Process Capability & Tolerance For PCB Manufacturing

Process Capability & Tolerance For PCB Manufacturing

6 Max finished Size (4L) inch 22.5*40(Needs Review If length exceeds 30 Inch) ENIG+OSP , ENIG+Gold Finger , Flash Gold+HASL , Flash Gold+Gold Finger , Immersion. Silver+Gold Finger , I[r]

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Vol 8, No 6 (2017)

Vol 8, No 6 (2017)

The descriptive data presented in Table 9 reveal the SLA theoretical knowledge that students would be willing to apply in the classroom based on their final course exams. For example, no participants mentioned the SIOP model (based on English for Academic Purposes, EAP) in their initial theories as highlighted in Table 8. However, the most frequently mentioned factor in their final theories was SIOP. Moreover, Practice lost support as a major factor in their final theories. An even more surprising outcome is that Exposure, tied for first place in their initial theories, did not make the list of the top 10 most frequently mentioned factors in their personal theories at the end of the course. Certain factors, such as L1 Transfer and Input were supported at the same level of intention to shift their practices in their initial and final rankings. In addition, Bilingual Education, Feedback, and Learner Variability received some support among the top 10 factors mentioned in their final theories, but received no mention in their initial theories.
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Vol 8, No 6 (2017)

Vol 8, No 6 (2017)

Table 1 gives an overview of the frequency of the feedback the teacher provided in response to student errors as well as the students’ self-repair after the teacher’s corrective feedback. The total number of feedback instances provided to incorrect answers was 29, and 6 mistakes were ignored: i.e., the teacher only provided corrective feedback in response to 83% of student’s mistakes. After the teacher’s feedback, students only repaired 14 (48%) times. As we can see from the Table 1, these beginner students made vocabulary mistakes most often, followed by phonology and grammar errors. While the teacher provided corrective feedback to all mistakes in vocabulary and grammar, he left almost half of the phonological mistakes without feedback. This means the teacher might not have been aware of, or paid enough attention to, the mistakes in pronunciation. Among all of the corrective strategies, the teacher used recasts and elicitations most, followed by linguistic clues. They only used explicit correction and clarification requests one or twice. In terms of repair, students were only able to self-repair some of their mistakes, with the highest proportion of repair found in contextual mistakes and the lowest in grammatical errors. All of these will be discussed in detail in the following sections.
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Vol 8, No 6 (2017)

Vol 8, No 6 (2017)

In 711 a contingent of Muslims led by Tariq Ibn Ziyad crossed North Africa via Gibraltar to the Iberian peninsula. In a few years, Muslims ruled nearly all Iberia or modern day Spain and Portugal. Muslims stayed in Iberia from 711 till their expulsion in 1600s. Over more than eight centuries, Arabic became the language of culture and administration (Plann, 2009). Some authors argue that the greatest Arabic influence of Arabic on Spanish language is lexical, where around 8% of Spanish vocabulary may be traced to Arabic origin (Quintana & Mora, 2002). This includes probably thousands of modern geographic locations that still hold Arabic toponyms dating back to the Moors. Figure 1 shows only 17 of such toponyms in Spain. In fact, it is quite common to find places that contain the word “Guada-”, meaning “river/valley” in Arabic. Examples include “Guadalajara” or “wadi al-hijarah/valley of stones”, “Guadalaviar” or “wadi al-abyad/white valley” and “Guadalcazar” or “wadi al-qasr/valley of castle.” (Please refer to Appendix for more details). ISSN 1798-4769
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Vol 8, No 6 (2017)

Vol 8, No 6 (2017)

So, the preference of a new combination of words instead of creating a totally new word to express a new meaning in the Chinese language is predetermined by its square shape, [r]

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Vol 8, No 6 (2017)

Vol 8, No 6 (2017)

In order to further understand the roles English plays for these international Nigerian college students in their education and to seek the effective pedagogy to teach a[r]

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Vol 8, No 6 (2017)

Vol 8, No 6 (2017)

To answer the second research question about the washback effects the policy led to, its influence on teaching will be discussed first followed by discussions on learning. Interview dat[r]

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Vol 8, No 6 (2017)

Vol 8, No 6 (2017)

Cooperative learning is group learning activity organized so that learning is dependent on the socially structured exchange of information between learners in groups and in which each learner is held accountable for his or her own learning and is motivated to increase the learning of others” (Olsen and Kagan, 1992,p.8, as cited in Richards and Rodgers, 2001).

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Vol 8, No 6 (2017)

Vol 8, No 6 (2017)

There were two versions of the questionnaire in this research - one is for native Thai speakers and another for international participants. The questionnaire for Thais was divided into three parts: introduction, personal information and questionnaire. In introduction part, the name of the study, objectives, instruction, and how to contact researcher were listed. In personal information section, the participants were asked to answer 7 questions regarding gender, age, nationality, educational level, overall English proficiency level, English’s reading skill and their knowledge on Thai food. In case of overall English proficiency level and English’s reading skill, the researcher adopted the English proficiency levels from Ngampramuan (2016) which were elementary, beginner, intermediate, upper-intermediate, advanced, proficient and native. Questionnaire section consisted of 20 items. Each of them had 2 sub-items. The example of questionnaire is displayed in Figure 2. The participants were asked to rate their intelligibility level by selecting one of six-point Likert scale starting from 1 (totally cannot understand) to 6 (fully understand) in the first sub- question. Six-point Likert scale was employed because it could provide reliable data and short enough to not burden the participants (Johnson & Christensen, 2016). In the second sub-question, the participants were asked to explain the mistakes if they saw any. In this question, five common mistakes, as adapted from Ngampramuan’s (2016) study, which were strange vocabularies/spelling, ungrammatical strings, transliteration, translation, cultural differences were listed as options. However, if the participants believed that there were other mistakes, they could provide their justifications in ‘Other’ box. Or, if they thought that there was no mistake, they could select ‘No mistake’ box. The respondents were free to choose more than one options.
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