Tourism in Higher Education

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Criteria that Ensure the Quality of Higher Education in Tourism and Sport Management Study Programme

Criteria that Ensure the Quality of Higher Education in Tourism and Sport Management Study Programme

The quality of higher education is predominantly determined by the work of academic staff and organization of instructional process; the criteria of higher education institution’s infrastructure are of moderate importance. Professional qualities of teaching staff that are related to communication with students during lectures are important for quality assurance; effective communication with others was found to be the most important personal quality of teaching staff. Professional qualities were evaluated as being more important than personal ones. The most effective teaching methods important to the quality of higher education are different types of group work in the classroom. In general, the teaching and learning methods used in delivering Sport and Tourism Management study programme were rated as effective. The following properties of learning materials used in Sport and Tourism Management study programme received the highest evaluation: information links to specialty, suitability, and applicability of theoretical knowledge in practice. The objective of the research is to diagnose and evaluate criteria that assure the quality of Sport and Tourism Management study programme. The main tasks set for the research were: to review the concept of the quality of higher education and aspects of its evaluation from the theoretical point of view; to discuss the general quality assurance criteria from the theoretical point of view; to evaluate the criteria that determine the quality of teaching and learning in Sport and Tourism Management study programme.

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The Construction of the Quality Evaluation System of Multi-angle Tourism Higher Education

The Construction of the Quality Evaluation System of Multi-angle Tourism Higher Education

Abstract: The booming development of tourism also makes some scholars gradually pay attention to the research on the quality of higher education in tourism-related majors, and some research results have been produced in recent years. Many scholars believe that studying the quality standards of tourism higher education is of great significance to the development of tourism higher education. This paper reviews the research contents of higher education quality assessment at home and abroad, and finds that scholars at home and abroad have different views on education quality assessment. Therefore, this paper collects the research articles of domestic and foreign scholars on higher education, classifies and compares their research contents, finds out the shortcomings of domestic education quality evaluation, refers to foreign research experience on education quality evaluation, and explores new directions suitable for domestic education quality evaluation. It is found that the quality assessment of higher education in foreign countries is earlier than that in China. Most of the higher education quality assessment in China is teaching-oriented, while some scholars are teacher-oriented. Only a few scholars conduct teaching assessment comprehensively from the aspects of school, teaching and students. Foreign scholars regard students as the important object of teaching evaluation and give them the most important status. Based on the current research results, this paper constructs a student-centered and multi-perspective tourism higher education quality evaluation system from five perspectives: teaching resources, curriculum evaluation, teaching evaluation and monitoring, teaching output and overall satisfaction of students.

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An investigation into the tourism and hospitality scholarly activity currently being undertaken in Irish higher education institutions

An investigation into the tourism and hospitality scholarly activity currently being undertaken in Irish higher education institutions

Target respondents were employed within the Irish HE sector, either through an institute of technology (IoT), a university or a private college. In the Irish context, an IoT provides vocational and technical education and training for the region served by the college (Government of Ireland, 2006). A university is a HE institution committed to teaching and research in the major disciplines (Higher Education Authority, 2008) and a private college is a non state-aided HE institution. In the Irish context, there are 14 IoTs, ten of which provide tourism and hospitality courses at some level, ranging from certificate to research-led PhDs. There are seven Irish universities, with only one providing a tourism or hospitality related course (MA in International Tourism) and research-led PhDs within this discipline. Some of the private colleges provide tourism or hospitality related courses up to honours degree level.

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Stakeholder Perspectives on Tourism Graduate Employability Skills in Vocational and Higher Education in Vietnam

Stakeholder Perspectives on Tourism Graduate Employability Skills in Vocational and Higher Education in Vietnam

In summary, this multi-faceted study was conducted to investigate the stakeholder perspectives towards the preparation of employability skills for tourism graduates in both VET and HE systems in Vietnam. There is a clash between the views of the three key players, yet their inputs provide educational merits and implications for all parties to provide the graduates with a smooth transition to the employment world. The training providers, especially the government and VET institutions, have not accorded adequate emphasis in skill promotion, yet the lecturers deserve credit when they take initiatives to embed skills through their teaching delivery. However, they should create a more inclusive environment and provide more equal opportunities to all students, not just dominating or leading students. They should also make the classroom activities more interactive and practical by giving individual students hands-on experiences. The institutions also need synchronous moves in their strategies to promote graduate skills, by organizing more extra-curricular activities and placing more emphasis on facilitating classroom-based interactions through infrastructure investment, as the two non-public institutions have done.

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Internationalisation in hospitality, leisure, sport and tourism higher education: A call for further reflexivity in curriculum development

Internationalisation in hospitality, leisure, sport and tourism higher education: A call for further reflexivity in curriculum development

enquiry regarding the student experience, the quality assurance challenges this poses for HE providers, and the implications for policy and decision-making in HEIs (see, for example, Knight, 2004; Stensaker et al., 2008). In the subject areas of HLST specifically, an increasing number of papers published in previous editions of this journal have dealt with issues such as the learning styles and experiences of international students (Huang, 2007; Pereda et al., 2007; Nield, 2007); the impact of Bologna on tourism education and scholarship (Munar, 2007); and the diverse HE environments that exist in different countries (eg. Akış et al., 2007; Edelheim and Ueda, 2007). This internationalising of HE curricula, and the sharing of

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Nonescost Mangrove Eco Techno Tourism and Research Center: A Higher Education Institution Innovation and Transformation (HIT) Plan

Nonescost Mangrove Eco Techno Tourism and Research Center: A Higher Education Institution Innovation and Transformation (HIT) Plan

Mangroves have been widely optimized by the ASEAN countries to effect community economic development through tourism activities that provided economic sustainability of the local communities. However, the benefits that the mangroves ecosystem gives is misconstrued by the local community as merely an economic endeavor or as means of livelihood. Hence, the College is faced with a challenge of improving the quality of lives of the local communities making use of its vast hectares of mangroves resources while preserving the environment. Ideally, while the College is raising its banner of becoming an acknowledge school of excellence in science, technology it shall likewise pull upward, if not in the same level, the economic status or lives of its immediate local communities. Therefore, it is necessary that strategic development programs, projects and earches shall be carefully planned, designed and implemented to ensure optimum utilization of human, physical and financial resources. Planning, installing and implementing a more focus and rigorous policies in this aspect is necessary to attain research and extension outcomes in the perspective of the local communities. The ultimate mission is to improve the quality of life of the local communities and graduates through convergence of instruction, research, extension and production with the t of the administration. Thus, this seeks to; establish sustainable livelihood programs/projects for the local community, promote conservation and sustainable management of fishery habitat-the mangrove ecosystem involvement or collaboration of the College, LGUs, DENR, BFAR, Foreign and Local Tourists, Parents, Alumni, Students and the Local Community. Essentially monitoring and evaluation of these programs, projects and activities ensures relevance, efficiency, effectiveness and inclusivity that ascertains organizational outcomes and of the NONESCOST mission-vision. Towards this, the following innovative solutions are proposed; One Tourist One Mangrove Policy (Adopt a Mangrove Approach Program), of Faculty Loads, Students Scholarship Programs, Fishery and Agriculture Livelihood PAPs, Pasalubong Center, Boating and Floating Restaurant in the Mangrove Area, Modified Ecotourism PAPs, and

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The role of tourism and hospitality companies in ensuring an effective internship process

The role of tourism and hospitality companies in ensuring an effective internship process

This paper draws the conclusion that, in order to achieve the aim of intern- ship, cooperation between all stakeholders is highly important during all of its stages – planning, organisation and control and feedback phases. The current research reveals that companies are willing to cooperate with higher education establishments, but greater involvement is desirable, especially during the plan- ning stage. The involvement of higher education establishments in the intern- ship process can be evaluated as suf Þ cient at the planning and assessment stage, but greater involvement in the process itself would increase con Þ dence in achie- ving the aim of the internship.

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Undergraduates' Experience and Perceptions of Tourism and Hospitality Work Environments

Undergraduates' Experience and Perceptions of Tourism and Hospitality Work Environments

Intern experience can provide higher education institutions (HEI) valuable information on employersƍ relationships towards the younger workforce in the tourism and hospitality industry (THI). The main purpose of this article is to investigate how interns are treated during their placements. Are they considered to be the companiesƍ future human capital, and thereby supported and stimulated to apply for jobs in the service industry that cannot prosper without devoted personnel? Novices and interns are always more vulnerable than more experienced personnel to the consequences of economic crisis and employer exploitation. Yet the tourism and hospitality industry constantly faces shortages of well-trained waiters, cooks, receptionists, animators, chambermaids, and other workers. A survey was carried out among interns that reveals reasons why some students during their study decide to leave the tourism and hospitality industry (or not enter it at all). We investigated their overall attitudes towards internships and their perceptions of conditions within the tourism and hospitality industry. The survey was conducted with a sample of students who completed placements in various tourism companies. A questionnaire seeking information on their satisfaction and circumstances of learning in the workplace was developed and distributed to them. The results of the content analysis provide useful information on employers’ attitudes and the quality of working environments.

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Immigrant Narrative Perspectives: Exploring Implicit Bias in Higher Education

Immigrant Narrative Perspectives: Exploring Implicit Bias in Higher Education

A study by Feiman-Nemser (1989) suggested a means for would-be instructors to conceptualize and prepare for the teaching profession; consistent with earlier prescriptions, this one involves writing and directing, rather than facilitating, lectures and evaluating students’ work in ways that are not Anglo-American-centric. Higher education faculty learn their craft through a combination of on-the-job training, mentoring, and studying teaching faculty as well as by following professional codes, values, and practices. The modern teaching profession distinguishes between implementing the structural conventions of teaching preparation on the one hand and theorizing ways to accomplish formative tasks that emphasize inclusion of non-Anglo (migrant) students on the other; thus education scholars sometimes refer to “reflective teaching and teacher education” rather than “competency-based” teaching (Feiman-Nesmer, 1989; Houston, 1974). The implicit bias that underpins the ways in which some instructors view and implement the tools available to faculty for such formative tasks as evaluating presentations and assignments and administering academic discipline in one-on-one meetings is likely to persist until a new, instructor-led educational design is implemented. It is up to those who advocate for learning materials that are culturally relevant and sensitive, student-centered, and embrace inclusion—that is, multiculturalists—to bring about the necessary changes (Banks, 2015; Gay, 2002; Ladson-Billings, 2003; Richards, Brown, & Forde, 2007; Taylor, 2010). The normative and formative tasks that perpetuate implicit bias and deny a diverse student body an equitable learning environment, in other words, are in need of a reform that will empower these students so that they may thrive.

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A Phenomenological Study of Education for Sustainable Development in Higher Education of Pakistan

A Phenomenological Study of Education for Sustainable Development in Higher Education of Pakistan

The interview protocols for sustainability in higher education institutes were developed keeping in view the work and principles of Lambert (2011) it was applied in an educational perspective for this study. The protocols covered three pillars of sustainability i.e. environmental, social and economic and asking whether those were factors that a higher education institute usually able to involve or deliver in i.e. education & research, university operations and external community. The interview protocol was validated by four experts in the related field. The tool was valid, certified by experts to measure the agreement of head’s institute level in concocting students as sustainable leaders and to judge the underlying situations for sustainability in their institutes

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Growth and Transformation through Higher Education An Analysis of the Higher Education System in France and Recommendations to India

Growth and Transformation through Higher Education An Analysis of the Higher Education System in France and Recommendations to India

restructuring and collaboration of research in higher education. This provision includes enhancing research strategies within higher education institutions by connecting students with national research facilities. The new law introduced territorial groupings to strengthen the coordination of training, research, and transfer policies as well as actions for the development of improvement of student life (Ministry of Higher Education, research and innovation, 2017). Many educational institutions are seeking to gain efficiencies by coming together with other institutions, fostering relationships, and pooling resources by creating "Communautés d’ Universités et d'Etablissements" (COMUE - Communities of Universities and Schools). The research coordination now falls between twenty COMUE groups and five new research association groups across France. COMUE groups include universities, Grande Ecoles, and research facilities. The goal of bringing these groups together is to increase international rankings and to promote international student inflow. While there are not enough results to measure the success of these COMUE groups, the success and continuous works of these groups can help enhance the quality of France's education system. By sharing any research completed through these groups will not only help improving challenges in the local area but also gain international visibility and improve global rankings.

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Challenges of Higher Education in India

Challenges of Higher Education in India

The Indian higher education system is one of the largest systems in the World. A large number of students are knocking at the doors of higher education institutions in the country. Indian higher education system has undergone massive expansion in post-independent India with establishment of several Universities, Technical Institutes, Research Institutions and Professional / Non-professional Colleges all over the country to generate and disseminate knowledge coupled with the noble intention of providing easy access to higher education to the common Indian. But the quality of higher education is not up to the mark. There is a need to develop a system of rewarding the best performing faculty members by providing performance-linked monetary and non-monetary benefits by implementing, annual performance appraisals, explicit promotion standards, and Performance-based remuneration system. Curriculum should be regularly reviewed and updated at least for every 4 years. More funding is needed to endanger research.

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Tourism and Hospitality Curriculum for Rural Communities Neighbouring

Tourism and Hospitality Curriculum for Rural Communities Neighbouring

The tourism and hospitality industry in Zimbabwe today, is the third largest foreign currency earner after agricultural exports and mining products. The industry is grounded on the country’s unique cultural and natural heritage which is made up of sensitive ecosystems encompassing national parks and wildlife. The growth of tourism stimulating increasing investments in the industry may trigger adverse long term effects of developments in biodiversity and loss of wildlife. It is therefore vital that communities living next to tourist attractions be educated so that they practise eco-tourism or sustainable tourism as a matter of priority. The focus of this article is to identify a curriculum for the education of communities living in and around tourist attractions in Zimbabwe. Such a curriculum should equip the communities with the requisite understanding to preserve and protect their environment effectively applying contemporary and traditional knowledge systems. In a bid to come up with an education curriculum and training programmes incorporating tourism and hospitality education, some 145 out of a population of 300 respondents were interviewed in and around the tourist resort areas of Nyanga, Harare, Bulawayo and Victoria Falls. The article extends a realistic and practical framework for the development of a curriculum and training-programme-guideline for communities incorporating “Tourism and Hospitality” as a subject.

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Using tourism to build social capital in communities: new pathways to sustainable tourism futures

Using tourism to build social capital in communities: new pathways to sustainable tourism futures

The research described in this paper is part of a larger project that seeks to address these limitations by investigating how the characteristics of tourism development can be linked to differential outcomes for rural communities in northern Australia in the present, and what future opportunities key stakeholders see for using tourism to enhance community well- being. This paper focusses on social capital and reports on the outcomes of a workshop with regional tourism development officers on finding ways to improve tourism contributions to community well-being. The main aims of the component of the research reported in this paper were to explore in more detail both actual and potential connections between tourism and social capital in regional destination development and to encourage innovative thinking about how tourism might make a stronger contribution to sustainable development in the future. The approach taken fits within Pain, Kindon and Kesby’s (2007) description of action research in that it was designed to simultaneously gather data to improve broader understanding of the phenomenon under study whilst also offering specific practical guidance for action. Thus the workshop activity reported here had two objectives:-

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Whither Scottish Higher Education? [Special Edition: Higher Education]

Whither Scottish Higher Education? [Special Edition: Higher Education]

Conventionally, government in the UK contributes to the funding of HE. This is, in part, to ensure supplies of graduates in particular disciplines such as medicine and teaching. In part, public funding reflects a view that society benefits from having a well-educated group in terms of behaviours, attitudes and concerns for others. A further element of the rationale is a recognition that access to education and the assumed resulting access to employment helps address problems of social disadvantage. Increasingly also, higher education through its research, knowledge exchange and education activities is seen as having important impacts in terms of employment and income generation, and, indeed, may be important to delivering governments’ growth objectives.

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ICT Integration in Teaching and Learning Activities in Higher Education: A Case Study of Nepal’s Teacher Education

ICT Integration in Teaching and Learning Activities in Higher Education: A Case Study of Nepal’s Teacher Education

The interview with the head of the Faculty of Education explored that the SHEP and NORHED projects initially provided 66 laptops and some multimedia projectors to establish a computer lab. In addition, the NORHED project further aimed at providing continuous technological and training support for the capacity building of the faculty. There was no allocated budget from the government for the project. The head stated that the Faculty of Education had a plan to digitise accounting and examination systems, to establish a digital library and to equip the college and staff with ICT tools and skills. He shared his plan to transform a traditional system of teacher education with the integration of digital technology. He reported that, although the laptops, projectors and internet (Wi-Fi) were available for the tutors and students in the lab, the practice of digital technology in teaching and learning was at the early stage. In the continuous interview, he expressed his dissatisfaction: “We have some level of educational technologies, but I have observed some classes without using them.” His expression indicated teachers’ limited use of available technology in their planning and teaching activities. Although he did not like to say much about teachers’ attitude and technology skills, his dissatisfaction against teachers’ limited use of ICT facilities indicated that perhaps the teachers had a low level of ICT skills and a lack of motivation to use available ICT facilities in their teaching plans and delivery.

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Students’ Readiness for E-learning Application in Higher Education

Students’ Readiness for E-learning Application in Higher Education

Introduction to e-Learning courses and other courses, Introduction to the Internet and computer skills courses for art students to participate in e-learning development skills are required. The readiness of art students as one of the important factors in implementing e-learning has been assessed in this investigation. Other factors and readiness of faculty members of art school are the basis for future investigations. More recent research can identify issues such as the need to study art students' learning styles and adapt them to the characteristics of the electronic learning environment, to guarantee successful e-learning implementation among them. Also, identifying the strengths and weaknesses of art education at universities in Iran and matching these with the strengths and weaknesses of virtual art education will lead to better understanding of threats and opportunities in implementing e-learning for art education in universities. REFERENCES

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An Analysis of Effective Learner Feedback Mechanism in Higher Education

An Analysis of Effective Learner Feedback Mechanism in Higher Education

The Nominal Group Technique provides educators with opportunities to capitalize on inquisitive behaviors of students to facilitate effective engagement and learning. Statistics for analysis and discussion are made available immediately after the NGT has been concluded, therefore this approach is very good on the part of the facilitator for quick results immediately. Furthermore, it provides for anonymity and freedom of expression by the participants. However, NGT must be administered with extreme care as it creates a situation where participants can fail to reconcile/converge their ideas. Also, I have noticed that it does not provide for an opportunity for multiple-analysis of points and hence they are higher chances of some limited capacity in this method to cross-fertilize ideas if there is need to do so.

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Financing Higher Education in India

Financing Higher Education in India

There is now sufficient evidence to show that higher education generated large positive externalities for growth and that the level of development of a country and the stock of highly educated manpower is related. This is also now widely recognized both in India and China. Among the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China), the enrolment rate in higher education is the lowest in India and also appears to growing the most slowly. Although, it is likely that expansion in enrolments in India is underestimated due to the poor data base regarding private unaided education, still the performance of China in expanding enrolment in higher education stands out as exceptional. The GER in higher education in china increased from 3 % in 1985 to 16 % in 2001. An area of great concern in India is the low level of per student expenditure, reflecting poor educational support and infrastructure. According to Carnoy (ibid.), the per student expenditure in Brazil in 2000 was $5,5000 PPP, whereas in China it was about $11,000 PPP. By contrast, the per student expenditure in India in 2000-01 was only $1300 PPP. The financing of higher education in India is still largely in the public domain. In India, however, private educational institutions played an important role from the very beginning. A large percentage of these institutions were provided recurrent financial support by governments and were closely regulated by the state. However, the new self-financing institutions which have grown rapidly since the 1990s are poorly regulated and are mainly governed by commercial motives. In China, by comparison, higher education was completely state financed but since the 1990s, nearly 30 % of total expenditure is financed through fee realization, while in India this element is lower, at about 12-15 %.

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Quality Teaching & Higher Education System in...

Quality Teaching & Higher Education System in...

Indian Colleges and universities are facing major changes as they navigate the 21scentury and make decisions that will not only impact higher education but will also contribute to our country’s future competitiveness in the global marketplace. This article examines various influences on institutions of higher learning as they move toward a customer-oriented focus. It also stresses the importance of balancing the needs of various customer groups while continuing to serve as purveyors of educated human resources in a global economy. This article identifies and evaluates outcomes from efforts to modify quality standards in higher education. While change is unavoidable and higher learning faces difficult choices, we can choose to make proactive decisions and become agents of change. The financial obligations of running an institution today are a major concern. While not a new concept, there is a trend for public institutions to redefine their identity as service organizations and businesses.1

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