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What Factors Are Associated With State Performance on Provision of Transition Services to CSHCN?

What Factors Are Associated With State Performance on Provision of Transition Services to CSHCN?

messages and information to the same extent as the parents of an older child. Finally, we used a composite variable in place of numerous variables that make up transition services and its subcomponents. Although a composite variable provides a quick assessment of whether children within a state meet a specific parameter, a compos- ite variable may “mask” information that would be useful in guiding pro- gram and policy development. The results of this study have impli- cations for both policy and practice. At the federal level, efforts that support the integration of the 6 system indica- tors in quality-improvement activities (particularly establishing a medical home and attaining or maintaining ad- equate insurance) are appropriate in light of this analysis and should con- tinue. At the practice level, Healthy and Ready to Work (www.hrtw.org) is a na- tional resource center through which Title V agencies and their stakeholders can share “promising practices in interagency collaboration, medical home, transition/youth, and family partnerships.” This analysis also rein- forces the roles and responsibilities traditionally fulfilled by state Title V CSHCN programs that relate to transi- tion services. These programs are charged with (1) ensuring that fami- lies of CSHCN are decision-making partners in all levels of care and are satisfied with the care received, (2) providing coordinated care in a medi- cal home, (3) ensuring that families of CSHCN have adequate insurance cov- erage, (4) ensuring that children are screened early and continuously for special health needs, and (5) organiz- ing community-based services so that families can use them easily.
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School to work transition services: marginalising ‘disposable’ youth in a state of exception?

School to work transition services: marginalising ‘disposable’ youth in a state of exception?

Disadvantaged young people often inhabit a dangerous space: excluded from education, training and employment markets; constructed as disposable; and cast out as ‘human waste’ (Bauman, 2004). There are many macro-level analyses of this catastrophic trend, but this paper provides insights into some of the everyday educational micro-practices which contribute to such marginalisation. It presents findings from a study of a national school-to-work transition service in England, in a context not only of neo-liberal policies but also of severe austerity measures. The data reveal processes of triage, surveillance and control – driven by governmental and institutional targets – which denied many young people access to the service, including some of the most vulnerable. Beneath a rhetoric of social inclusion, the service in fact acted as a conduit into a dangerous space of exclusion. Drawing on the work of Butler and of Agamben, the article argues innovatively that such practices may represent an encroaching state of exception, in which more or less subtle forms of governmentality are gradually being supplanted by the more overt exercise of sovereign power.
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Longitudinal Evaluation of Transition Services (“LETS Study”): Protocol for outcome evaluation

Longitudinal Evaluation of Transition Services (“LETS Study”): Protocol for outcome evaluation

of hospitalizations and emergency care will be deter- mined from MOHLTC summaries that provide informa- tion on frequency and duration of access, which we expect will vary as a function of continuity of care. All other outcomes will be obtained through personal assessments using standardized and study-specific tools. A demographic questionnaire and community participa- tion form were developed specifically for the study. Three different standardized measures of health and well-being will be used: the self-rated health scale from the National Health Interview Survey [50], the Health Utilities Index (HUI3 [52]), and the Assessment of Health-related Quality of Life (AQoL [51]). Young et al.’s work provides health status scores for the HUI3 and the health scale for youth and adults with CP, ABI, and SB [13]. These historical data will be valuable in under- standing the patterns of change in the current study. The LIFE-H [48] and a survey on community involve- ment, developed for the study, will be used to assess so- cial participation. However, currently there are no measures available regarding youths’ transition readi- ness; that is, their capacity to navigate the adult system as a function of transition preparation. Thus, to provide an approximation of this capacity, Arc’s Measure of Self- Determination (capacity to determine their own fate) [46], Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Disease (cap- ability to perform in a goal-directed manner) [53], and Partners in Health (PIH) self-management questionnaire (the ability to participate in the management of one’s health condition) [45] will be used. All standardized
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Disparities in Transition Planning for Youth With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Disparities in Transition Planning for Youth With Autism Spectrum Disorder

though target population and severity measurements varied considerably, these studies reported similar fi nd- ings; ie, as the complexity of condition increases, the likelihood of receiving HCT services decreases. The comorbid condition variables used within the present study may be a more accurate measure of complexity because it is not as subjective as parental report of functioning and activity limits. In general, YSHCN who have more complex health care needs are less likely to receive transition services. As a youth ’ s health becomes increasingly compromised, the health care provider has more to do. Counseling youth on transition into adult life and adult health care services may seem like an impossible and/or inconsequential task when the most of a short appointment time with a physician is spent ad- dressing immediate and pressing health needs. Many physicians are not trained in caring for YSHCN, especially youth with behavioral and/or commu- nication challenges. 5,31,32 Few physi-
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“Transition from children’s to adult services for adolescents/young adults with life-limiting conditions: developing realist programme theory through an international comparison”

“Transition from children’s to adult services for adolescents/young adults with life-limiting conditions: developing realist programme theory through an international comparison”

Phase one of the TASYL study in Ireland was a survey of children ’ s and adult services in health, social, educa- tional and charitable organisations, using a questionnaire to gather descriptive data on the organisational approach to the transition to adult services for adolescents/young adults with life-limiting conditions in the island of Ireland. The survey results are reported elsewhere [1]. The 20 item questionnaire included open, closed and Likert-type questions. Questions focused on the type of transition services provided, the approach to managing transition, the organisational factors that contributed to the effectiveness of the transition process and the profile of service users. While the TASYL study included data collection from both childrens and adult services in health, social, educational and charitable organisations, the study in Toronto focused on collecting data only through pediatric health care centres. The survey was adapted in 2015 for use in Toronto based on a review of the literature with a particular focus on research con- ducted in Canada and the expertise of the study team and collaborators at each of the three sites. Items in the survey were also made more specific to services provided at the three data collection sites in Toronto (see Supple- mental File 1 for survey items). The purpose of the sur- vey in Toronto was to gather descriptive data on transition services from the perspective of health and so- cial care professionals who provide care to adolescents with life-threatening conditions.
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2019_Harrell.pdf

2019_Harrell.pdf

Every state currently offers some amount of healthcare transition services to individuals leaving prison, but there is little research on whether, and how, these services are effective at reducing recidivism. This paper focuses on the extent to which healthcare transition services are effective, and identifies which services are effective, controlling for state spending. Using data provided by the Pew Charitable Trusts, I examine how the number of services offered, as well as the amount spent on prison healthcare within a state affects the recidivism rate at the state level. The primary model is a multivariate ordinary least squares model with state-level recidivism as the dependent variable. Then, I use a separate multivariate model to examine ten transition services that are in less than 80% of states. Next, I estimate the effect of each individual service in a third model. Finally, I use a fixed-effects model to estimate how changes in both total and per-inmate healthcare spending affect recidivism. The results of these models suggest that providing more services lowers recidivism. However, not all transition services are equally effective. Community supervision and transition services that provide for people suffering from substance abuse, namely referrals or appointments, were shown to be among the most effective services. On the other end, mental health appointments were the least effective. Increased access to community supervision is the recommended policy, with individuals getting at least one meeting prior to or just following release. Further research is needed to determine why
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Different models of best practice for transition to adulthood and adult services

Different models of best practice for transition to adulthood and adult services

Access to transition services/support Better mental health support during transition Provision of timely and accurate information Inclusive ‘vulnerable adults’ teams in adult social care[r]

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Rethinking Digital and Sensory Marketing in Globalizing Contexts of Political Economy: Revisiting ICT Consumer Cultures in the Symbolism and Dynamism of Postmodern Spaces

Rethinking Digital and Sensory Marketing in Globalizing Contexts of Political Economy: Revisiting ICT Consumer Cultures in the Symbolism and Dynamism of Postmodern Spaces

With the symbolic meanings of commodities in focus, the chief role of consumption and digital marketing is to contribute to the construction of the consumer‟s self-fulfillment by creating his identity through symbols, culture, aesthetics, language productivity and everyday life events. In the process of attaining self-fulfillment, the individual consumer is represented as a sovereign and rational figure, who is striving to optimize the value of his life though personalization of his choices in the universe of capitalist products and services (Du Gray et al. 1997) [32]. Consumption is not a given any longer, but an assumption posited according to which consumers themselves engender self-images, images and identities through products and services in order to fulfill their hopes, dreams and wishes. In the universe of globalization, individual consumers experiment with various roles, identities and self-images which, themselves, are susceptible to alternative images and identities. With fragmentation, life-style stories are narrated online through games, movies, e-books and through real-life experiences. Thus, through hyper-reality (Kellner 1995) [33], a digital world of imagination and fantasy is created in which the individual consumer explores his identity by fusing the everyday life and the unreal life experiences. Products, services and any kinds of commodities have embedded in them cultural and social traits that, in turn, incarnate meanings capable of creating new identities, values, attitudes and symbols by while the younger generations live. The different generations (X, Y, Z) are impacting on the consumption and marketing culture in ways that create mobility. Mobility is taking multiple forms such as displacements of labour, travel, multiculturalism and development of ICT skills for constructing experiences of social change.
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The dynamic effects of changes to Japanese immigration policy

The dynamic effects of changes to Japanese immigration policy

Section 2 below presents the model. Section 3 shows how it can be rendered stationary and suitable for finding a steady state. In section 4 we discuss calibration of the model and discuss possible policy changes. Our policies differ in the mix of skilled and unskilled workers that are allowed to immigrate. Section 5 explains the technique for finding linear approximations of the policy functions that govern the dynamics of our simulated model. We simulate the various policy options and derive both smooth transition paths as well as ones with confidence bands for the key variables considered. Section 6 concludes the paper.
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Enhancing the relationship between the landscape of energy transition and the ecosystem services

Enhancing the relationship between the landscape of energy transition and the ecosystem services

Regarding “modeling methodologies” we found uncertainties in input data. The matrix approach was based on experts and trade-offs between RET and ES on the literature. According to Bennet et al (2009), data on trade-offs for ES are valid at the local scale, and their relevance in other context need a proper interpretation. For example Ladenburg and Dubgaard (2007) demonstrated that the willingness to pay to reduce the “visual disamenities” of wind farms, increases with the distance of wind turbines from the shore. Differently Gee and Burkhard (2010) showed the concern of residents of Schleswig-Holstein for off-shore wind farms in the North Sea, because destroy the cultural value of the free horizon of their seaside. These studies demonstrate opposite value for the trade-off between wind turbines and cultural ecosystem services, in the first stakeholders prefer to site wind turbines off-shore as far as possible from the coast line, in the second they would prefer to have turbines in the inner land. This is due to the fact that different landscapes are attributed of different values. In Schouwen-Duivelan the free horizon of the sea doesn’t represent a shared value between the stakeholders that participated to the workshop, while a specific view of the inner rural landscape was considered valuable. This clearly shows, in line with Bennet et al. (2009), that trade-off between ecosystem services should be assessed at local scale. It is possible to refer to data sets in evident cases as the trade-off between food production and dedicated energy crops, but even in this case it depends on the design strategy. Expert interpretation, scaling and contextualization of data are required in different applications.
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Ecosystem Services’ Based Impact Assessment for Low Carbon Transition Processes

Ecosystem Services’ Based Impact Assessment for Low Carbon Transition Processes

The 2005 Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) could be considered one of the main efforts to promote worldwide effective environmental assessment approaches, sponsored by the United Nations. The most provoking contribution promoted by MA is based on the concept that the ecosystem values in decision-making should be grounded on the idea of services provided to humans. This requires new interpretative parameters and computational tools in order to produce the required additional knowledge to reinforce the rational ‘decision makers’ in making ‘better’ decisions and policy choices (Owens, 2005; Sanderson et al., 2002). Compared to that, “sustainability” has become a main policy concern both domestically and internationally, with increasing prominent place in decision-making processes concerning environmental issues (Bulkeley & Jordan, 2012). However, such a rising awareness in political debate produced strong thematic commitments: i.e. RES transition as a way to reduce CO 2 emissions. We are in the case of a conflict between human activities
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Youth experiences of transition from child mental health services to adult mental health services: a qualitative thematic synthesis

Youth experiences of transition from child mental health services to adult mental health services: a qualitative thematic synthesis

Youth’s insight into transition timing showed the tim- ing to be arbitrary and misaligned with their own devel- opmental needs. With mental illness frequently emerging in adolescence [1], some youth had only re- cently become engaged in mental health service use and may have had less comfort and investment with accept- ing mental health care. Having gaps or suboptimal care during this time may tip these already at-risk individuals into disengagement. Furthermore, current transition timing means transition is rarely an isolated event [3]. Changes in living arrangements, parenthood and other stressors of entering adulthood may take precedence over mental health treatment. Young people’s experi- ences of inflexible policies, such as the limitations im- posed by catchments areas, only add to the difficulty in youth remaining engaged.
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Observational study of the development and evaluation of a fertility preservation patient decision aid for teenage and adult women diagnosed with cancer: The Cancer, Fertility and Me research protocol.

Observational study of the development and evaluation of a fertility preservation patient decision aid for teenage and adult women diagnosed with cancer: The Cancer, Fertility and Me research protocol.

The overall aim of the ‘ Cancer, Fertility and Me ’ study is to develop and evaluate a new evidence-based PtDA for women with any cancer considering fertility preserva- tion. The data generated as part of this study should help us identify factors associated with its implementa- tion in practice, and/or integration in care. During its evaluation, the cancer care clinical teams will hand out information about the study and the PtDA. We will capture data on the acceptability of this method of inte- gration within care from the clinical teams. It may be our clinical teams think a short skills training session on using our PtDA within cancer and fertility services will support its implementation in usual practice. It is likely future research evaluating our PtDA ’ s impact on health outcomes may therefore also need to include an assess- ment of shared decision-making training within an implementation study ’ s process evaluation.
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Observational study of the development and evaluation of a fertility preservation patient decision aid for teenage and adult women diagnosed with cancer: the Cancer, Fertility and Me research protocol

Observational study of the development and evaluation of a fertility preservation patient decision aid for teenage and adult women diagnosed with cancer: the Cancer, Fertility and Me research protocol

The overall aim of the ‘ Cancer, Fertility and Me ’ study is to develop and evaluate a new evidence-based PtDA for women with any cancer considering fertility preserva- tion. The data generated as part of this study should help us identify factors associated with its implementa- tion in practice, and/or integration in care. During its evaluation, the cancer care clinical teams will hand out information about the study and the PtDA. We will capture data on the acceptability of this method of inte- gration within care from the clinical teams. It may be our clinical teams think a short skills training session on using our PtDA within cancer and fertility services will support its implementation in usual practice. It is likely future research evaluating our PtDA ’ s impact on health outcomes may therefore also need to include an assess- ment of shared decision-making training within an implementation study ’ s process evaluation.
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Observational study of the development and evaluation of a fertility preservation patient decision aid for teenage and adult women diagnosed with cancer : The Cancer, Fertility and Me research protocol

Observational study of the development and evaluation of a fertility preservation patient decision aid for teenage and adult women diagnosed with cancer : The Cancer, Fertility and Me research protocol

The overall aim of the ‘Cancer, Fertility and Me’ study is to develop and evaluate a new evidence-based PtDA for women with any cancer considering fertility preserva- tion. The data generated as part of this study should help us identify factors associated with its implementa- tion in practice, and/or integration in care. During its evaluation, the cancer care clinical teams will hand out information about the study and the PtDA. We will capture data on the acceptability of this method of inte- gration within care from the clinical teams. It may be our clinical teams think a short skills training session on using our PtDA within cancer and fertility services will support its implementation in usual practice. It is likely future research evaluating our PtDA’s impact on health outcomes may therefore also need to include an assess- ment of shared decision-making training within an implementation study’s process evaluation.
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Energy Intensity of GDP: A Nonlinear Estimation of Determinants in Iran

Energy Intensity of GDP: A Nonlinear Estimation of Determinants in Iran

Energy intensity is a measure of the energy efficiency of a nation’s economy. Many factors influence a country’s energy intensity. In this paper, however, we note the effective factors of energy intensity and decompose it by applying Logistic Smooth Transition Regression (LSTR) in Iran during the period 1980- 2013. The main factors are the ratio of the added value of services to GDP (explaining both linear and nonlinear part of the energy intensity), the percentage of internet users, income per capita and Human Development Index (explaining nonlinear part of the energy intensity). The results indicated that the lifestyle and structural changes had a significant and considerable effect on decreasing energy intensity and that the ratio of services value-added to GDP as a transition variable caused an asymmetric behavior of energy intensity affected from explanatory variables. The most effective factor on energy intensity was Human Development Index.
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Observational study of the development and evaluation of a fertility preservation patient decision aid for teenage and adult women diagnosed with cancer: the Cancer, Fertility and Me research protocol

Observational study of the development and evaluation of a fertility preservation patient decision aid for teenage and adult women diagnosed with cancer: the Cancer, Fertility and Me research protocol

The overall aim of the ‘ Cancer, Fertility and Me ’ study is to develop and evaluate a new evidence-based PtDA for women with any cancer considering fertility preserva- tion. The data generated as part of this study should help us identify factors associated with its implementa- tion in practice, and/or integration in care. During its evaluation, the cancer care clinical teams will hand out information about the study and the PtDA. We will capture data on the acceptability of this method of inte- gration within care from the clinical teams. It may be our clinical teams think a short skills training session on using our PtDA within cancer and fertility services will support its implementation in usual practice. It is likely future research evaluating our PtDA ’ s impact on health outcomes may therefore also need to include an assess- ment of shared decision-making training within an implementation study ’ s process evaluation.
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The new political geography of poverty

The new political geography of poverty

Countries in Transition Countries in Transition Countries in Transition Countries in Transition Countries in Transition Countries in Transition Countries in Transition Countries in Trans[r]

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An Action Plan for SOLAS (An Seirbhísí Leanúnaigh Agus Scileanna), The new Further Education and Training (FET) Authority

An Action Plan for SOLAS (An Seirbhísí Leanúnaigh Agus Scileanna), The new Further Education and Training (FET) Authority

boundaries as they become ETBs. The other 30 VECS will be involved in amalgamations involving two or three VECs in each case. The process of designating the CEOs for the new ETBs has been completed and new CEOs will be appointed to ETBs once the ETB legislation is passed. The designation of CEOs for the ETBs will facilitate commencement of planning. Issues ranging from payroll to facilities management and other back-office functions will require a range of solutions and the complexities of bringing cohesion to frontline services will pose their own demands. The resolution of all of the issues involved will require different timescales in different ETBs. This requires that we provide for a phasing of the transfer of the functions of FÁS to the ETBs. This has implications not just for the ETBs but for the time it will take for SOLAS to fully achieve its new organisational form and for the DES in relation to the pace of transfer of functions to FÁS.
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Transitions of Care from Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services to Adult Mental Health Services (TRACK Study): A study of protocols in Greater London

Transitions of Care from Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services to Adult Mental Health Services (TRACK Study): A study of protocols in Greater London

determinants of effective and poor transition by evaluat- ing the process of transition using a case note survey and a parallel organisational diagnostic analysis within and between health and social care agencies. Detailed case studies will then explore service users', carers' and mental health professionals' views on transition. Comparison of these findings should help answer some of the questions raised by this paper: What are the reasons for discrepan- cies between potential and actual transitions? Who stays in CAMHS beyond the transition boundary and why? Do variations in protocol-sharing units leave gaps, i.e. CAMHS/AMHS interfaces that are not covered by agreed protocols, or are they a result of trying to cover gaps? Can CAMHS and AMHS develop shared, common criteria for identifying those who need careful transition planning and a successful transfer of care?
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