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Dangers Associated with Commercial Motorcycle Transport Business: Implications for Adult Education in Nigeria

Dangers Associated with Commercial Motorcycle Transport Business: Implications for Adult Education in Nigeria

Okada as commercial motorcycle transport business is popularly called in Nigeria is highly distracting. Young youths and adults who should have being in training for a skill in one profession or the other have found okada business as a cheap source of livelihood. This makes it difficult for them to enlist for training in specialized professional skills. A lot of people that should have been active in the productive sector of the economy are found in okada business. The implication is that the country will still find it difficult to attain her vision of becoming one of the most productive economies by the year 2020. The reason is because manpower needed to realize this vision is lacking. It is not that the population is not there, but a large number of the population is unskilled and are found doing okada business as a cheap source of livelihood. Another implication is that in time to come, people who are skilled in some technical vocations will be scarce because young people are no longer interested in learning the skills in those vocations. Such vocations include auto mechanic repairs, bricklaying, plumbing, carpentering, painting, welding, electrical installation and maintenance, agriculture, baking to mention a few. It is agreeable that these vocations contribute to a great extent to the growth of any nation’s economy. The skills are lacking and the young people are no longer interested in them. How can our economy survive?
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Statistics in Focus  Transport business statistics Buses and urban railways largest employers in the passenger land transport sector  2000 16

Statistics in Focus Transport business statistics Buses and urban railways largest employers in the passenger land transport sector 2000 16

The turnover per person employed is the lowest for the whole transport industry 3 High personnel costs put a strain on operating results 4 The domination and the increasing share of pass[r]

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Statistics in focus  Transport Business Statistics Road haulage: Italy and Spain with the highest rates of self employment  2000 4

Statistics in focus Transport Business Statistics Road haulage: Italy and Spain with the highest rates of self employment 2000 4

Value added at factor cost is 91 21 0 Unit labour cost calculated as follows: Value added at This is labour costs per employee: basic prices + Operating subsidies linked "Personnel costs[r]

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Statistics in focus  Industry, Trade and Services  Transport Business Statistics  Ports and terminals dominated by large and productive companies  1999 13

Statistics in focus: Industry, Trade and Services. Transport Business Statistics. Ports and terminals dominated by large and productive companies. 1999.13

1.00 0.95 0.89 0.98 0.91 0.98 persons employed per enterprise Table 1: Number ofpersons employed and employees in the 'supporting and auxiliary transport' sector Belgium has a relatively[r]

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Transport business statistics  Data 1993 1996

Transport business statistics Data 1993 1996

Section I Transport,storage and communication 60.1 Transport via railways 60.21 + 60.22 + 60.23 Other land transport' without 'freight transport by road' 60.24 Freight transport by road [r]

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DEPARTMENT FOR TRANSPORT BUSINESS CONTINUITY MANAGEMENT POLICY

DEPARTMENT FOR TRANSPORT BUSINESS CONTINUITY MANAGEMENT POLICY

1. This policy is a key part of the Department for Transport’s internal control framework and specifically covers the Department’s approach to Business 1 Continuity Management (BCM). This policy applies to all parts of the Department for Transport (DfT) and its Executive Agencies and all of the activities it undertakes. The Department’s Non-Departmental Public Bodies (NDPBs) and those treated as NDPBs are to decide what BCM arrangements they need to have in place, using this policy as a guide.

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Lost in translation: Problems in interpreting business attitudes to transport

Lost in translation: Problems in interpreting business attitudes to transport

The business attitudes review sought specifically to provide insights into: how transport was perceived, in relation to other factors, to impact upon business decisions; the business priority requirements from transport; and the main tradeoffs, opportunities and barriers. In this context, it must be emphasised that the current paper represents a further interrogation and analysis of existing evidence that was identified and reviewed in the study undertaken for the DfT (see Lyons et al., 2009). As such, the paper is a synthesis of the DfT report, but with its own focus and emphases. In methodological terms, the review initially distinguished between ‘easy to reach’ and ‘harder to find’ evidence. The former was identified principally from a process of bibliographic searching and online search engines. Search terms included ‘business survey transport’; ‘business views on transport’; ‘transport concerns of businesses’; ‘survey of business attitudes’; ‘UK business opinion on transport issues’; ‘supply chain efficiency’; ‘UK employee parking’; ‘logistics survey UK’; and ‘business location difficulties UK.’ The latter involved making direct approaches to organisations that might be gatekeepers for further evidence inaccessible or less apparent in the public domain. The latter resulted in contact with 32 organisations, including national representative bodies such as the Confederation of British Industry, the Federation of Small Businesses, the British Chambers of Commerce, the Institute of Directors, and the British Retail Consortium, together with a range of regional bodies. It should be noted that each of the agencies contacted in some sense represents, or collates, a group of businesses, and not a single organisation, nor the range of individuals within an organisation
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Kangaroo Transport Instead of Incubator Transport

Kangaroo Transport Instead of Incubator Transport

Because kangaroo transport means continuous kangaroo care during transport, the cardiorespira- tory system might be more stable than during incu- bator transport. During incubator transports, the transfer of the infant in and out of the transport incubator (and especially the transfer and securing of the heavy transport incubator into and out of the ambulance) is often connected with swift and rough movements. Kangaroo transport might ameliorate much of this jarring motion. In addition, kangaroo transport might improve the security of the infant by fastening the infant to the mother and the mother to the emergency gurney. Kangaroo transport might be a possibility to maintain mother-infant contact after birth and to improve parent-infant bonding. How- ever, it might not be appropriate for critically ill infants, who need repeated handling and therapeutic interventions during transport.
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A business analysis of the South African domestic commercial air transport market : low-cost carriers and full-service carriers in the context of the business environment and passenger behaviours

A business analysis of the South African domestic commercial air transport market : low-cost carriers and full-service carriers in the context of the business environment and passenger behaviours

The introduction of the low-cost model to South Africa in 2001 presented a number of unique challenges to the incumbent full-service carriers. Important decisions had to be made on how to respond to the low-cost carriers’ way of doing business and their appeal to the broader South African flying population. The low-cost carriers also had a number of crucial issues to tackle if they were to succeed in a market dominated by South African Airways. Each operator had to identify an effective way to compete in the market without resorting to full-out price wars, which could have damaged them all. An additional problem area for the South African LCC sector is that the low-cost model is often misunderstood by consumers and many other groups not involved in the LCC sector. A review of what is written in the newspapers, complaint sites, and other media, shows that many people, including passengers specifically, still do not have an understanding of the airline industry, especially the mechanics of the low-cost model. However, consumers should not be expected to understand the mechanics of the model and it rests on the shoulders of the carriers to ensure that the passenger is fully aware of what to expect and what the service entails. The key misunderstanding is contained in the fact that the average consumer views the concepts of cost and price as interchangeable. In other words, to the consumer, a low-cost airline implies a low-fares airline. If the LCC fare is seen to be higher than a FSC fare, or not much of a differential, then the LCC is viewed in a negative light. The success of the airline requires that these barriers be overcome in order to deliver a clear message to the consumer that will instil greater confidence in the purchase of a travel product. It is essential that target markets be thoroughly understood and clearly defined so that the correct message is formulated.
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Towards an ontology of transport: Transport naturalised

Towards an ontology of transport: Transport naturalised

processes not ontologically supported by the current theories of the time. The challenge to find how entities actually manifest themselves through those black box type processes led Alexander to consider the structure of wholeness with the observation that ‘what grows and unfolds’ does so ‘as a natural consequence of what it is, because it literally grows out of wholeness – structure in space – a structure of symmetries that exist in the way that a given portion of space is differentiated. Immediately the similarities of this description have with Swenson’s ontology are apparent. The idea of wholeness as a structure in space as a real structure also has parallels with Deleuze’ concept of a plane of immanence, from which things in the world emerge through a process of segmentation where the discrete components are entities with boundaries that play an expressive role in the functional nature of matter. Alexander describes wholeness as ‘nearly a substance’ (1980) and goes on to he describe the limitations of physics where it identifies the behaviour of electrons, photons, as dependent upon the wholeness defined by the apparatus and so we do not have an adequate way of depicting what wholeness is. DeLanda offers a solution to this with the concept of an N universe. For the description given by Alexander, the wholeness of the apparatus would be an N+1 dimension. What DeLanda teases out of Deleuzian thinking is that there are types of advanced maths that describe and so approximate an N world. That is, where the thing itself describes its totality without the need to reference an N+1 set of coordinates. Such a non-Cartesian view of the world can flow from Alexanders wholeness as nearly a thing, but a more complete, and more robust explanation is possible using DeLanda’s theories of materialism. Here, territorialisation and those things that can be materially traced via the virtual, and mechanism independent processes to singularities, progressively broken symmetries come from a total possibility space that he labels the plane of immanence. The ideas now being developed in new materialist thinking are consistent with those of Alexander who said ‘Of course, if this hidden structure of symmetries, latent in space, guides and shapes events in a foreseeable way, then it will be quite natural to say that the unfolding of the system is guided by wholeness, because this will be a mathematical consequence of the system of structures’ (1977). This description is close to the metaphysics of neo materialist terms and the challenge here, and that leads to how it can be applied to transport within the new ontology.
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Business Models for Next Generation Transport Networks

Business Models for Next Generation Transport Networks

Abstract. Control plane technologies will play a major role in next generation transport networks. Many publications and stan- dards claim that approaches like Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) and Automatically Switched Optical Networks/Transport Networks (ASON/ASTN) will simplify network operation and will enable new services. In this paper, an approach is presented to analyze the business processes of transport network operators. The main operator processes are mapped to the well-known value chain concepts of Porter. This allows investigating the advantages of control plane technologies from an economic point of view. This paper shows that the introduction of control plane technology affects the business of the individual operators as well as the overall value system they form as a virtual enterprise. Moreover new business opportunities are identified and two business cases are presented.
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Europa transport. Observation of the transport markets. Transport survey No. 4

Europa transport. Observation of the transport markets. Transport survey No. 4

Pourcentage dtentreprises signaLant avoir rdaLisd des investissements ProcentdeL af virksomhederne som mei.der, at de har reaLiseret investeringer ProzentuaLes VerhliLtnis der Unternehme[r]

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Europa transport. Observation of the transport markets. Transport survey No. 3

Europa transport. Observation of the transport markets. Transport survey No. 3

Pourcentage drentreprises signatant avoir eu des difficuIt6s de tr6sorerie ProcentdeL af virksomhederne som meLder, at de har haft l-ikviditetsvanskeIigheder ProzentuaIes VerhiiLtnis der[r]

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Europa transport. Observation of the transport markets. Transport survey No. 2

Europa transport. Observation of the transport markets. Transport survey No. 2

/Pourcentage drentrepnises signaLant une augmentation de trafic ProcentdeL af virksomhedenne som meLder en stigning i trafikken eine Verkehrssteigerung argeben ProzentuaLes Verhilltnis [r]

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Europa transport. Observation of the transport markets. Transport survey No. 1

Europa transport. Observation of the transport markets. Transport survey No. 1

/Pourcentage dtentreplises signaLant un trafic stabLe lPr"ocentdeL af virksomhederne som meLder uandr^et tnafik / ProzentuaLes VerhdLtnis der Unternehmen, d'ie den Verkehr aIs unverdnder[r]

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Inland waterways transport systems. Transport research. Maritime transport

Inland waterways transport systems. Transport research. Maritime transport

Transport modality related: - Cooperatives of Shipowners Firms of Shipowners Individual Shipowners Shipbrokers Goods/Cargo related demand supply and co-ordination: -Shippers - Shipping a[r]

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Managing a 'people business' in times of uncertainty: Human resources in Ocean Transport & Trading’s strategy in the 1970s

Managing a 'people business' in times of uncertainty: Human resources in Ocean Transport & Trading’s strategy in the 1970s

restructuring which reflected both Ocean’s specific situation and the influence of management concepts developed at US business schools. 16 Like many other firms at the time, Ocean turned to outside consultants and sent promising young managers on MBA courses. 17 Nicholas Barber, who joined Ocean in 1964 and later rose to the position of CEO, took an 18-month MBA course at Columbia University in 1969-71 and then returned as the company’s Strategic Planner, introducing a system of budgeting and five-year strategic plans. 18 While strategic planning was kept firmly under the control of Ocean’s own executives, the new company structure was largely the work of Boston Consulting Group. It turned Ocean Steam Ship Co. Ltd. into a parent company with three main divisions (the so-called M-form or multidivisional structure that was a common outcome of company reorganisation in the UK at that time): 19 Ocean Liners Ltd (OLL) took over the commercial operation of all liner ships from the hitherto separate lines (Ocean’s main shipping line, Blue Funnel, as well as Elder Dempster, Glen, Henderson and the Dutch subsidy NSMO); Ocean Titan Ltd (OTL) managed non-liner shipping (tankers and bulk carriers) and Ocean Fleets Ltd (OFL) provided maintenance and manning services to all ships in the group. Another operating division was added when Ocean bought the logistics and services company Wm. Cory in 1973. Group strategy was in the hands of a three-man Executive Committee free from operational
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The work-related affordances of business travel: a disaggregated analysis of journey stage and mode of transport

The work-related affordances of business travel: a disaggregated analysis of journey stage and mode of transport

Sociological understanding of how business travellers make use of travel time is somewhat lacking. This paper addresses this gap in knowledge via presenting the analysis of survey-based data collected from business people travelling by plane, train and car. Through disaggregating the data by travel mode, journey stage, technology use and task type the paper provides a level of granular detail into the general patterns of business traveller s travel -time behaviours not previously provided by other surveys. Utilizing the concept of affordances the paper shows how the type of work activities
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AIR TRANSPORT IN TRANS-EUROPEAN TRANSPORT 
NETWORK

AIR TRANSPORT IN TRANS-EUROPEAN TRANSPORT NETWORK

By virtue of these decisions, the Trans-European Transport Network is created in stages with integration of the network infrastructure of road, rail, maritime highways, ports and inland shipping, air transport and other interconnection points between networks in the European Union. The assumption for 2020 is the planned completion of the 30 priority objectives. The guidelines, which closely relate to the transport network, must be reviewed every five years in order to adapt them in the best way for the changes that are constantly taking place in the technology and business development in the transport sector.
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Transport Protocol. Travel Insurance. Organisation of Transport

Transport Protocol. Travel Insurance. Organisation of Transport

Institutions wishing to transport smaller numbers of learners may decide to make use of a minibus, which may be their own, owned by another school or hired from a commercial organisation. However sourced, the use of minibuses is governed by strict regulation. All minibus drivers should undertake MIDAS (Minibus Driver

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