Undergraduate Education

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Undergraduate Education

Undergraduate Education

population at University Park, increasing demand for academic support for World Campus students, and newly emerging student needs are impacting Undergraduate Education units that work directly with students. Penn State Learning is seeing five-year highs in demand for its services: in fall 2013, 8,370 visits for math tutoring and study groups, turning students away at peak times; more than 3,000 visits for writing tutors with long waits at times; and nearly doubled attendance for Guided Study Groups. There is increasing interest in tutoring for online courses, both those offered by departments and through the World Campus, demand for foreign language tutors is rising, and there is a need for speaking and writing help for international students. Adequate staffing is a key concern in meeting these needs and demands. As Penn State’s population of international students continues to grow, it is important to find ways for them to be integrated into the student life of the University to fully contribute to and benefit from the diversity on campus. Student orientation, academic advising, and English language skills are other areas where special support may be needed.
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Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education

Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education

We address the teacher's how, not the subject-matter what, of good practice in undergraduate education. We recognize that content and pedagogy interact in complex ways. We are also aware that there is much healthy ferment within and among the disciplines. What is taught, after all, is at least as important as how it is taught. In contrast to the long history of research in teaching and learning, there is little research on the college curriculum. We cannot, therefore, make responsible recommendations about the content of good undergraduate education. That work is yet to be done.
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Improvement of effectiveness of instructors in undergraduate education

Improvement of effectiveness of instructors in undergraduate education

There are numerous different approaches for measuring and improving the quality in undergraduate education. "Educational Evalution Systems" is one of the most significant one of the cited approaches. The most important components which affect the quality of education in "Educational Evaluation Systems" are considered to be the education itself, the students and the instructors. The purview of this study is limited to “instructors”, which is one of the foregoing components, with an eye to achieve more accurate results. When the resources as to evaluation of instructors and improvement of effectiveness thereof are researched, it has been observed that they basically contain findings and recommendations that emphasize the importance and use of the data as to course evaluation forms. The objective of the study, in this context, has been determined as the creation of an advice list which will help improvement of effectiveness of the instructor before the instructor commences giving course to students. Questions only regarding the evaluation of instructors among the questions within the course evaluation forms utilized in undergraduate education have been determined as the methodology of this study at the first stage in line with the defined purview and objective. In the next stage, these questions were compared in a systematic way and the similar ones were eliminated. An advice list consisting of 116 items which will help to improve the effectiveness of the instructor was created at the latest phase of the study in line with all the information obtained.
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Undergraduate Education Background and Ethical Decision Making

Undergraduate Education Background and Ethical Decision Making

A study of northeastern United States higher education institutions compared differences among religiously affiliated universities and the impact of courses on ethics and religious studies (Comegys, 2010). This study did not specifically address CMD, but rather utilized a survey instrument to assess general attitudes toward business ethics. Respondents included individuals at all levels of undergraduate education. Students from religiously affiliated institutions were found to have “more ethically inclined attitudes about business” (p. 41). Business students who completed an ethics course were found to exhibit a more strict ethical perspective, while non-business students demonstrated no significant difference in ethical business attitudes. Religious studies courses were found to positively impact the ethical attitudes of business majors and non-business majors, although the impact on non-business majors was more pronounced.
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The Student Committee on Undergraduate Education

The Student Committee on Undergraduate Education

Increased interest in the study of international development among Penn undergraduates, faculty members, and administrators has led the Student Committee on Undergraduate Education to propose the creation of a Center for International Development in order to formalize the many existing resources the University has to offer. We believe that a Center for International Development and a well-conceived undergraduate program in international development would enable Penn students to engage with pressing issues and would further Penn’s broader efforts in the research of and participation in development work worldwide. While the exact details of the Center and program remain to be determined, SCUE looks forward to working with administrators, faculty members, and other student groups to ensure that Penn becomes a place where undergraduates can study and partake in international development work. Making this a priority will certainly enhance Penn’s status in the scholarly and activist community, but more importantly, by training today’s students to think innovatively and complexly about real problems in international development, Penn will make a significant and important difference in the world for the foreseeable future. SCUE appreciates your taking the time to read this document. Please contact us to discuss this proposal in more depth. Thank you.
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Values Added Undergraduate Education at the Universities of the CIC

Values Added Undergraduate Education at the Universities of the CIC

Different students benefit from different educational settings. Small liberal arts colleges provide the most congenial learning environment for some, others blossom at community colleges, and many thrive at major research institutions. Each has a distinctive and valuable approach to teaching undergraduates. We do not intend to address those kinds of individual differences or to prescribe which kind of institutional setting is best for which students. We do, however, assert that the scope, scale, and diversity of the research university enable it to address and accommodate the educational needs of a very large number of undergraduate students. The human and physical resources that place it at the forefront of advancing knowledge make the research university uniquely capable of offering the kind of education that will prepare today's undergraduates for the rapidly changing knowledge-intensive world in which they will live. The opportunities our institutions afford enable our students to obtain an excellent undergraduate education within a context that makes their experience meaningful and useful both to them and to our society.
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Programs in the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) that support chemistry education

Programs in the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) that support chemistry education

Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) National Science Foundation.. 199 th Conference of the Two-Year College Chemistry Consortium.[r]

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Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education

Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education

The seven principles have guided inquiry into the educational conse- quences of new communication and information technologies. At George Mason University, for example, a faculty technology survey asked whether computer technology encourages contact between faculty and students, encourages cooperation among students, and so on through the list of prin- ciples. The Flashlight Project, which uses the seven principles along with other ways of evaluating the impact of technology on student learning, offers opportunities for faculty to engage in discussions about technology (Chickering and Ehrmann, 1996). Karen Gentemann in the Office of Insti- tutional Assessment at George Mason writes that in using the Flashlight Project materials, she has “been encouraging faculty to read some of the arti- cles in which the principles are discussed” (personal communication, 1998). The seven principles have also been deployed in professional develop- ment workshops. Peter Frederick, a professor of history at Wabash College, describes how he uses them: “I have used the seven principles as a standard first page for probably well over a hundred workshops I have done in the past decade throughout the nation. . . . The workshops are variously titled: ‘Active Learning in the Classroom,’ ‘Revitalizing Traditional Forms of Teach- ing and Learning,’ ‘Empowering Learners for a Diverse Democratic Society.’ The workshops are almost always interactive, [a format that allows me to] model the principles. . . . What prompted me to use them? They are pithy and make sound pedagogical sense. Pithiness is important for faculty, who do not want much educational theory” (personal communication, 1998). George Kuh, professor of higher education at Indiana University, who has used the seven principles “at least fifty times in presentations over the past few years,” comments that “people always copy them down from the over- head and want copies” (personal communication, 1998).
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Student Handbook. Undergraduate Education. College of Education. University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Student Handbook. Undergraduate Education. College of Education. University of Nevada, Las Vegas

The  Department  offers  graduate  courses  in  assessment,  human  development,  higher  education,   learning,  measurement,  and  research,  which  support  all  programs  in  the  College  of  Education.   In  addition  to  the  graduate  studies  programs,  the  Department  provides  core  foundations   courses  for  teacher  education  programs  in  the  College  of  Education  and  is  the  academic  site  for   a  career  and  personal  development  course  offered  through  the  UNLV  Student  Development   Center.  
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The Degree of Openness of Undergraduate Education to Contemporary Art

The Degree of Openness of Undergraduate Education to Contemporary Art

We live today in a complex, ever changing world, with a wealth of scientific and technological discoveries, along with a great variety of artistic events; a world in which new concepts are emerging that try to define the condition of contemporary man. As a consequence, previously known parameters change; new terms are emerging, determined by the reality of the new times, globali- zation-driven reality, the diminishing—tending towards disappearance—of the boundaries between culture and subculture and the predominance of the vis- ual. Inevitably, the educational act is influenced by these phenomena. The extent to which education in the artistic sphere is open to understanding these changes will determine the growth and development of people capable of adapting to new social and cultural-artistic realities. Without minimizing the values and results of the teaching experience, it is clear that the younger generation of teachers has a much more flexible approach, even though cur- riculum documents often operate in fixed frames.
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Virtual patient design in undergraduate education

Virtual patient design in undergraduate education

Charmaz,  2007):  credibility,  originality,  resonance  and  utility.  This  includes  the  use  of   an  externally  peer  reviewed  research  protocol  which  has  been  externally  scrutinised   by  a  dedicated  Education  Research  Committee.  This  work  uses  all  the  hallmarks  of   GT:  purposeful  sampling,  constant  comparative  analysis,  conceptual  memoing,  open   and  axial  coding,  saturation  sampling,  and  the  use  of  diagrams  to  help  explain  theory   (Corbin  and  Strauss,  2008).  I  hold  a  digital  audit  trail,  from  audio  recordings  on  file,   to  transcriptions,  to  the  CAQDAS.  I  have  presented  multiple  quotations  to  support   this  research.  For  example  I  am  are  not  aware  of  any  peer  reviewed  published   research  in  this  field  that  (1)  evaluates  VPs  expressly  constructed  to  evaluate  design   (2)  allows  other  researchers  with  appropriate  software  to  access  the  research  cases   (3)  evaluates  students  patterns  of  use  inside  the  cases  using  data  logs.    I  have   already  described  a  clear  acceptance  of  my  own  preconceptions  and  reflexivity  as   described  in  my  methodological  considerations  (Cresswell  2007,  Corbin  and  Strauss   2008,  Malterud,  2001,  see  Figure  8,  p.  81).    
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Optical Polarimetry in Undergraduate Education

Optical Polarimetry in Undergraduate Education

In this paper I present an overview of the optical polarimeter that was designed and constructed for use with the 0.5 meter (20 inch) telescope at the VMI Observatory. Section 2 reviews the design of the instrument with a goal toward showing how this can be a learning process for the students. In section 3 I present the basic mathematics necessary to analyze the images that are obtained. Section 4 presents three observing projects that could be utilized during an observational astronomy class or as long-term undergraduate research projects.

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UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION: LEGAL EDUCATION: LICENSURE:

UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION: LEGAL EDUCATION: LICENSURE:

American lnsltute of Medical Law,lnc,School of HeaLhCare Risk Management, May 1988-」 une 1989,Certification as Health Care Risk Manager(scho。 ln。. longerin existence)[r]

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Distance Education and the Undergraduate Curriculum

Distance Education and the Undergraduate Curriculum

The Independent Study model of distance education assumes that the educational experience has been structured to give students the greatest possible control over the time, place, and pace of education. These elements of learner-centeredness have become the classic definition of distance education. Within this very general definition, there are a wide variety of practices that can be grouped in three models. These models represent not so much differences in instructional purpose as they do differences in technology and in institutional purpose. However, the differences have proven to be significant ones in terms of how the practice of distance education has affected undergraduate education. They are: correspondence study, telecourses, and the open university.
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Knowledge Development in Undergraduate Clinical Nursing Education

Knowledge Development in Undergraduate Clinical Nursing Education

Academic faculty perspectives on the teaching and learning experience in the DEU are limited to a small sample (N=7) of qualitative findings suggesting there is support from clinical staff and a focus by staff on tasks versus clinical teaching. Their responses to a questionnaire were eliminated do to low numbers for statistical analysis, (Wotton & Gonda, 2004). Clinical teaching staff reported concerns with the initial time commitment in the early part of clinical, lack of knowledge about clinical teaching, and developing of an intermediary relationship between academic faculty and staff nurses (Moscato et al, 2007). Research into the role of the clinical teachers has been a focus of the DEU literature. Clinical teachers supported the increased time students spent in the DEU as providing an opportunity to get to know students better, felt positive about their progress, challenged by student questions, and supported by academic faculty. Clinical teachers acknowledged an increased desire to expand their own knowledge, and some sought out continuing their formal education. They were able to facilitate clinical experiences through their ongoing understanding and knowledge of the clinical
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Profiling disadvantaged undergraduate students in higher education

Profiling disadvantaged undergraduate students in higher education

the students’ social capital base. From a social capital perspective, student support services, the level of education of a society or a communi- ty constitutes social capital. Disadvantaged stu- dents reflect a low social capital base because they come from low SES schools and communi- ties as reflected by a low quintile status (quin- tiles 1, 2 and 3). Thus, low quintile schools are underresourced in terms of financial capital, so- cial capital and human capital. A number of stud- ies have affirmed the association between SES and academic progress. Understanding disad- vantaged students therefore requires an assess- ment of their capabilities in terms of assets (fi- nancial capital, human capital, social capital and physical capital) based on the context of vulner- abilities (capability constraints) within which they operate such as trends, shocks and stress- es (for example, student failure, dropout, taking longer to graduate) and environmental factors. Amartya Sen’s capability approach, which is normatively similar to the SLA, focuses on what people are effectively able to do and to be. The analytical distinction in the capability approach is that between the means and ends of well-be- ing and development (Robeyns 2005). Only ends are of fundamental significance and means are merely instruments to achieve well-being, jus- tice and social development. In the context of this study, the capability to study and graduate with a university degree (an end) is an important variable and unit of analysis. Similarly, the SLA is people-centred; it focuses on what people can do, given their livelihood context and livelihood assets to determine livelihood outcomes. In the capability approach, livelihood outcome is akin to the notion of functioning.
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Undergraduate marketing education in the UK

Undergraduate marketing education in the UK

The initial step was to derive a list of UK HEIs offering undergraduate classes and programmes related to marketing. A long-list was developed using information from HESA and UCAS. This list was shortened by removing institutions not relevant to the study – either by scope or by only offering PG programmes and classes. Examples would be the School of African and Oriental Studies, the Royal Vetinary College and Bishop Grossteste University. This reduced the list of institutions from 130 to 108.

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Undergraduate Professional Education in Chemistry

Undergraduate Professional Education in Chemistry

ACS approval publicly recognizes the excellent chemistry education opportunities provided by an institution to its students. It also provides standards for a chemistry curriculum based on broad community expectations that are useful for a program when designing its curriculum or acquiring resources. The approval process provides a mechanism for faculty to evaluate their programs, identify areas of strength and opportunities for change, and leverage support from their institutions and external agencies. Faculty benefit from the commitment to professional development required of approved programs. Students benefit from taking chemistry courses from a program that meets the high standards of ACS approval, and ACS-certified graduates benefit from their broad, rigorous education in chemistry and the recognition associated with their degree.
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Simulation based learning in undergraduate nursing education

Simulation based learning in undergraduate nursing education

learning from the environment takes place through the process of observational learning. Information is then stored and coded cognitively to be used as a guide for action. Bandura believed that the creation of a realistic learning setting fosters the acquisition of complex skills by incorporating the three areas of environment, behavior, and thought. In the context of nursing education, simulation opportunities function to provide clinical decision-making opportunities for students in a more controlled setting with realistic results. It also provides a venue for faculty to provide timely feedback regarding students’ direct interventions and interactions such as patient education and team communication. This aligns with Bandura’s assertion that “humans are active information processors and link the relationship between their behavior and its consequences (Bandura, 1977, page 24).
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