Warehouse Management Systems

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Analysis and Study of Warehouse Management Systems

Analysis and Study of Warehouse Management Systems

The objective of a warehouse management system is to provide a set of computerized procedures to handle the receipt of stock and returns into a warehouse facility, model and manage the logical representation of the physical storage facilities (e.g. racking etc.), manage the stock within the facility and enable a seamless link to order processing and logistics management in order to pick, pack and ship product out of the facility. Warehouse management systems can be standalone systems or modules of an ERP system or supply chain execution suite. The primary purpose of a WMS is to control the movement and storage of materials within a warehouse – you might even describe it as the legs at the end-of-the line that automates the store, traffic and shipping management. In its simplest form, the WMS can data track products during the production process and act as an interpreter and message buffer between existing ERP and WMS systems. Warehouse Management is not just managing within the boundaries of a warehouse today; it is much wider and goes beyond the physical boundaries. Inventory management, inventory planning, cost management; IT applications & communication technology to be used are all related to warehouse management. Warehouse management today also covers the container storage, loading and unloading.
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THE IMPACT OF SUPPLY CHAIN IN THE WAREHOUSE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS OF TURKISH AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY

THE IMPACT OF SUPPLY CHAIN IN THE WAREHOUSE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS OF TURKISH AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY

In today’s competitive automotive industry where finished products appear similar, companies are under pressure by market forces to improve their supply chain capabilities if they are to compete in the market place. The rising modifications in vehicles models, types and designs across different segments with increase in the differentiation of spare parts has also made the Supply Chain Management more complex than ever before in a lean environment of the auto industry. In this article, which explain the framework, functionality and impact of Supply Chain Management (SCM) in productiveness of the industry in times of economic melt-down and expansion in product line? The researcher, measures the impacts of improved Warehouse Management Systems (WMS) in the automotive industry supply chain against the 14 automotive manufacturers operating as Original Equipment Manufacturers and Automotive Components Manufacturers in Turkey with emphasis on production capacity, annual sales and market share of each company as reported in the annual company report 2013/2014.
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Standardization of System Integrated Solutions in Warehouse Management Systems (WMS) Implementations

Standardization of System Integrated Solutions in Warehouse Management Systems (WMS) Implementations

Logistics plays an important role in a Supply Chain to ensure the materials are flowing thru the entire supply chain channel seamlessly and efficiently. And, the Warehouse Management Systems (WMS) help facilitating that in a supply chain, being WMS one of the key IT Logistics Systems. Due to globalization and dynamic market and consumer behavior, WMS has been integrated with the external systems for accurate and timely data communication and effective business collaboration. Managing these systems integrations become complex and tedious when the business runs on different industry verticals and on different platforms. Hence, it becomes very important and necessary for the Logistics service providers to standardize the system integrated solutions when it comes to WMS implementations. This article explains the feasibility of standardizing the system integrated solutions in WMS Implementations and the pros
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PeopleSoft EPM 9.1: Financial Management Solutions Warehouse

PeopleSoft EPM 9.1: Financial Management Solutions Warehouse

Related language tables store descriptions and other language-sensitive elements in all languages other than the base language of the database. In this way, while any table in the database can store data in the base language of that database, only tables that have related language tables can maintain the same data in multiple languages simultaneously. For example, it is unlikely that you would maintain the descriptions of your general ledger journal lines in multiple languages—the sheer volume of the journal lines in most systems would preclude any effort to maintain translations of their descriptions. The cost of hiring a translator to translate each journal line would be prohibitive, and in most cases only the person entering the journal line, and possibly that person's supervisor, would be likely to want to view that information again. However, for frequently used values, such as a chart of accounts, many users across your entire organization would often need to refer to this data. Therefore, you would most likely maintain the descriptions of each ChartField entry in each language spoken by your users. In this case, you would not need a related language table for your Journal Lines table, as you would be maintaining journal line descriptions in a single language, which would be in the base table. However, you would need a related language table for each of your ChartField tables.
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Data-driven Warehouse Management in Global Supply Chains

Data-driven Warehouse Management in Global Supply Chains

estimate the demand size for the warehouse for certain time frames (i.e. daily or weekly), and third, they must plan the inbound-outbound volume for the warehouse considering the supply chain network from origin to end user. Here, uncertainty in demand size and time frames can trigger unexpected issues regarding warehouse space – an important warehouse resource. In global supply chains, this uncertainty often originates from volatility in demand and disruption of distribution. Moreover, the impact of inaccurate estimates is difficult to counter in cross-border networks involving diverse parties. When manufacturers ship goods from overseas factories based on forecast ranges in demand, it is time consuming to mitigate the impact of inaccurate forecasts as in-transit goods take a long time to arrive at warehouse destinations. As a result, warehouses then hold an aging inventory of unneeded goods. Uncertainty leads to waste of warehouse resources such as handling labor and storage space. Challenge two is responsiveness. Responsiveness is regarded as one of the most important supply-chain performance indicators, even emphasized as a long-lasting value advantage over competitors. It has been difficult and expensive to develop responsiveness in global SCM with long distances separating suppliers and customers. However, growing cross-border electronic commerce (e-commerce) has made responsiveness more affordable in the global supply chain. More manufacturers now consider cross-border, overseas markets as their extended business scope through e-commerce. At first, they competed only with price schemes. Now, easy price searching on the Internet has narrowed price gaps among competitors. In contrast, non-price value distinctions in logistics services still endure since it takes time and capital for rivals to fully develop similar advantages. For instance, faster delivery service or flexibility for order cut-off times can lead to a competitive advantage. Although responsiveness in the global supply chain has become easier in many ways (e.g. international express parcel service), it remains a challenge for manufacturers with global supply chains to efficiently surpass the responsiveness of local manufacturers. Warehouses must offer innovative, responsive order fulfilment to achieve a sustainable competitive business advantage.
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Study of Logistics Warehouse Management System Based on RFID

Study of Logistics Warehouse Management System Based on RFID

The basic information of a productability Automated Storage/Retrieval System(AS/RS) is as follows: reservoir area (long×width×high m) 53.9×15.3×8.08, the production time 320 days, every 3 class run 24 hours, conventional 2 class, 17 hours operation. There are two roadway which has a roadway stacker each. There average 300 pieces of outbound or inventory palle a day. The peak value of every day is up to 900. Using RFID can meet needs of collecting goods information real-time and accurately, quickily by automation means, realizing the goods scientific management, speeding up the loading and unloading goods and increasing the efficiency of inventory. Survey data are shown in Table 1,The following procedure is designed based on the above needs
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An Extensive Study on Data Warehouse, OLAP used for Implementing ERP Systems

An Extensive Study on Data Warehouse, OLAP used for Implementing ERP Systems

The roots of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems may go back to half a century ago. With the development of information technology (IT) and the demands of organizations, ERP which originated from manufacturing cores had covered nearly all essential processes and functions of organizations two decades ago. Although some shifts happened during these years, according to Columbus (2013), in despite of the worldwide ERP software market share in 2012 shows that the SAP is still leading the worldwide market with 24.6 percent market share, new ERP vendors with tremendous growth indeed pose a potential threat. Meantime, the worldwide ERP market experienced slow growth of 2.2 percent, yet quoted from Columbus (2013) “Software-asa-Service (SaaS), financial management and Human Capital Management (HCM) applications showed potential for breakout growth.” The ERP report of Panorama Consulting Solutions (2013) pointed out that the traditional ERP software was chosen by the majority of 61 percent with an increase of 3 percent over 2012, and 26 percent of respondents selected software as a SaaS and cloud ERP. To put it bluntly, the traditional ERP industry is shifting. The various demands of organizations are accelerating the diversity of ERP software. Apparently, the survival in natural selection will lead the next generation.
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Assessing the environmental impact of integrated inventory and warehouse management

Assessing the environmental impact of integrated inventory and warehouse management

(iii) Emissions are integrated as a constraint within the inventory optimisation model. Following the first approach, Bonney and Jaber (2011) extended the economic order quantity (EOQ) model to include environmental cost. They showed that the optimal ordering policy including environmental cost leads to larger lot sizes than the classical EOQ model without environmental cost. Bouchery et al. (2012) is an example of the second approach and they studied the EOQ model in a multi-objective setting where emission criteria are included in the objective function. They identified the efficiency frontier between cost and carbon emissions and showed that carbon emissions could be decreased without increasing cost significantly. Similar conclusions were found by Chen et al. (2013) who analysed the EOQ with a constraint on total carbon emissions, as per the third approach. Other papers using one of these three approaches include Jaber et al. (2012) who modelled a two-stage supply chain where they considered carbon tax and an emission penalty. Hua et al. (2011) examined the impact of inventory management decisions within a carbon emissions trading scheme and assumed fixed, plus linear variable, carbon emissions per unit stored. Arikan et al. (2014) extended the scope of analysis into a wider supply chain setting by including carbon from inventory holding, warehousing and transportation in a dual sourcing setting. They explored the impact of inventory management decisions on transport and warehousing costs and emissions. This paper, however, used a fairly simple model for warehousing, based on emissions per storage unit per day. Similarly, Battini et al. (2014), who examined economic order quantities and transport modes, used emissions per cubic metre stored. However, even in inventory management, the consideration of environmental performance is still in its infancy. Hassini et al. (2012) stated that “one of the least investigated issues in sustainable practices is the choice of inventory management policy”.
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Web based: A data warehouse on osteoporosis data  warehouse in the osteoporosis community health  information management system

Web based: A data warehouse on osteoporosis data warehouse in the osteoporosis community health information management system

to being a noninfectious chronic disease (NCD) that is arousing increased attention-like diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Osteoporosis has definite pathophysiolo- gical and social psychological effects in addition to exer- ting economic consequences [1]. Osteoporosis can increase the incidence of fractures. Among osteoporosis patients, about 30% of females suffer fractures [2]. Osteoporosis has no obvious symptom, thus it is referred to as a “si- lent” disease. Patients tend not to properly understand treat- ment nor do they place a strong emphasis upon it. Most elderly osteoporosis patients have a low educational level and therefore do not fully use the services provided by health departments. Therefore, staff in community health centers needs to provide instruction, intervention, and appropriate management prior to disease attack.
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A Framework of Data Warehouse Systems Success: An Empirical Study

A Framework of Data Warehouse Systems Success: An Empirical Study

C. Reflection on findings regarding service quality The finding of this study indicated that service quality had positive and significant impact on the net benefits. The conclusion was reached having in minded the following reasons: IS services delivered on time by the IT unit could lead to timely and efficient decision making, which in turn results to better organizational efficiency. Moreover, by having knowledgeable DW specialists who are able to maintain communication well through interactions with business units could results to better services aligned with organizational goals. In addition, the existence of users’ best interests at heart who are able to understand the needs of business users better, leading to improve profitability and improve the quality of decision- making. Furthermore, by promoting better services to business users via DW systems would enable rapid responses to new business opportunities. Another reason of this positive influence is great services delivered by IT unit and DW system could lead to enhances cooperation, coordination, and communication; increases trust; and create commitment between DW parties. Besides that user who perceives their system as not providing the expected services or the desired outcomes could not give attention or serious cooperation with DW parties. Finally, by having knowledgeable DW team members who are able to do their jobs well and understand the specific needs of business users could results to better communication and cooperation between them.
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Advantages of a Layered Architecture for Enterprise Data Warehouse Systems

Advantages of a Layered Architecture for Enterprise Data Warehouse Systems

Transformation Transformation Data Propagation Business Transformation Transformation Transformation Transformation Special Sales Data Transformation Special Sales Data 7 Sales Order [r]

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Increase productivity and safety data of warehouse systems using Shareplex for Oracle

Increase productivity and safety data of warehouse systems using Shareplex for Oracle

One of our goals is to create a replication scheme that has minimal impact on the source sys- tem. Log replication is done independent of the Oracle transaction. Hence, it does not make a dif- ference from the user perspective whether a table is replicated or not. The response time of both online and batch transactions is minimally impacted by this type of replication. In addition to the direct impact on the transactions that are involved with trigger-based replicated tables, there is a constant overhead on systems that host a replicated database. As one can imagine, the overhead of managing the replication process by means of database triggers and insert/update/delete transac- tions can be very significant. Oracle uses background processes to determine what, when and where to replicate. These background processes scan what could become large tables. If rows are found, they are sent via SQL*Net to the remote sites. Once this is done, the rows are deleted from the local site. With database snapshots, the overhead is relatively low since only the ROWIDs of the modified rows are inserted and deleted. In symmetrical replication, the entire before and after image of the complete record is manipulated, which many times ends up causing chaining that further increases the overhead. Log replication does not manipulate the database for every change. The modification queues are stored in flat files that are a hundred times faster to scan than data- base tables. If the workload is moderate, the data flows in and out of the queue without being flushed to disk. You may be concerned that your site generates hundreds of megabytes of redo log data every day - “Surely log replication will cause a huge amount of network traffic.” What we have found is that only a fraction of the log is user data. The log is written in blocked mode (so if the block is 2K and there were only 124 bytes to write before a commit, there will be 1900 bytes of wasted space). Additionally, Oracle writes index modifications and other “accounting” informa- tion to the log such as changes to the high-water-mark, adding and removing blocks from the free list, and more. These modifications do not require replication. Another advantage of log replica- tion that increases its speed is the ability to use array operations on the remote database. Rather than performing the operation a row at a time, a whole batch of rows may be applied simultane- ously.
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Low carbon warehouse management under cap-and-trade policy

Low carbon warehouse management under cap-and-trade policy

There are several fruitful directions for future investigation. First, in our model, the green technology investment is only assumed to reduce the initial warehouse carbon emissions. Although this assumption is reasonable for warehouse operation, one important research extension is to incorporate the technology investment on reducing the unit warehouse carbon emission (e) in the modelling. In addition, Fahimnia et al. (2015) argued that instead of choosing between carbon tax and cap-and-trade system, a hybrid regulatory scheme can be investigated, and suggested that developing and comparing deterministic versus stochastic modeling efforts can examine the differences in these types of policies. Another future extension of this could be to analyse the green/low carbon warehouse management under a combination of different carbon emissions control policies, and discuss their effects on warehouse decisions and performances.   Finally, this research can be extended to other supply chain processes such as production, logistics, and retailing, as achieving the low carbon objective requires coordinated action of the whole supply chain.
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PeopleSoft EPM 9.1 Supply Chain Management Warehouse PeopleBook

PeopleSoft EPM 9.1 Supply Chain Management Warehouse PeopleBook

EPM also uses related language tables to support multilanguage processing. In each of the three data warehouse layers (the OWS, OWE, and MDW), all records that have translatable description fields have corresponding related language tables. Related language tables are defined for every OWS, DIM, and D00 table that contain translatable values. For example, the table CUSTOMER_D00 has a corresponding related language table CUSTOMER_LNG. Related language tables have key structures identical to the related DIM and D00 table plus one additional key field called language code (LANGUAGE_CD). The language code field holds the source language value. Prepackaged ETL jobs extract this data from a PeopleSoft source system and populate the field with your source language value.
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Measures for Designated Delivery Warehouse Management of Dalian Commodity Exchange

Measures for Designated Delivery Warehouse Management of Dalian Commodity Exchange

16. The Designated Delivery Warehouse shall manage its futures delivery business through a computerized system, use uniform formats prescribed by the Exchange for its accounting book of commodities for futures contract deliveries and relevant invoices, vouchers and bills, and send said documents to the Exchange on a regular basis.

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Data Warehouse Management Using SAP BW Alexander Prosser

Data Warehouse Management Using SAP BW Alexander Prosser

Transfer Structure Transfer Structure Transfer Structure Transfer Structure Data Sources (user-defined) Transfer Structure Transfer Structure Communication structure Communication stru[r]

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PeopleSoft EPM 9.1 Customer Relationship Management Warehouse PeopleBook

PeopleSoft EPM 9.1 Customer Relationship Management Warehouse PeopleBook

Related language tables store descriptions and other language-sensitive elements in all languages other than the base language of the database. In this way, while any table in the database can store data in the base language of that database, only tables that have related language tables can maintain the same data in multiple languages simultaneously. For example, it is unlikely that you would maintain the descriptions of your general ledger journal lines in multiple languages—the sheer volume of the journal lines in most systems would preclude any effort to maintain translations of their descriptions. The cost of hiring a translator to translate each journal line would be prohibitive, and in most cases only the person entering the journal line, and possibly that person's supervisor, would be likely to want to view that information again. However, for frequently used values, such as a chart of accounts, many users across your entire organization would often need to refer to this data. Therefore, you would most likely maintain the descriptions of each ChartField entry in each language spoken by your users. In this case, you would not need a related language table for your Journal Lines table, as you would be maintaining journal line descriptions in a single language, which would be in the base table. However, you would need a related language table for each of your ChartField tables. When the system displays a language-sensitive field value, it retrieves the text from either the base table or the related language table, depending on the following:
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Represent Aggregate Knowledge in Data Warehouse and OLAP Systems by Gathering bases with Objects

Represent Aggregate Knowledge in Data Warehouse and OLAP Systems by Gathering bases with Objects

Many researches were in subject of multi-dimensional aggregate in various outlooks. Research devote to aggregations along hierarchy had a lot of benefit over the last conclude. several researches study how (along hierarchies how data may be aggregated), also recognized as compendium ability. Aggregations are achieved using many operators , like MAX, SUM, MIN, AVG, RANGE, COUNT , VAR, etc. . Motivation to learning aggregations over hierarchy is to increasing control role model of multi-dimensional which important in systems to make decision support . (Rafanelli, and Shoshani, 1990) refer to that the concept of epitomizability pointed to the calculation of aggregation of values . It has been observed that epitomizability demand two needful condition : disjointnes and completenes. Disjointnes require in order to categories do not interfere (Rafanelli, and Shoshani, 1990). In other word , completeness cases should be no losted value . These condition is equal to the next assurance.
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Analysis of node deployment in wireless sensor networks in warehouse environment monitoring systems

Analysis of node deployment in wireless sensor networks in warehouse environment monitoring systems

parameters and make trend forecasting to reduce the possi- bility of disaster events; can ensure warehouse environment security, reduce losses; can ensure the product service qual- ity and enhance customer satisfaction. In recent years, with the development of microelectronics and wireless commu- nications technologies, wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have drawn the world’s attention. A WSN contains wireless sensors that have the ability to sense, calculate, communi- cate, observe, and react to events that occur in a particular area. The application of WSNs technology is a development direction of warehouse environment monitoring systems. Warehousing intelligence is a key research issue of modern logistics [2]. The WSNs technology is in line with the trend of intelligent development. WSNs has the advantages of easy deployment and self-organization that can overcome the weaknesses of the traditional monitoring methods, it has a broad space for development in warehouse environ- ment monitoring and is gradually replacing the traditional monitoring networks.
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Factors Influencing the Successful Implementation of the Warehouse Management System (WMS)

Factors Influencing the Successful Implementation of the Warehouse Management System (WMS)

There are many WMS systems available in the market and customers choose them based on their business nature, complexity and ROI. In the last decade or so, below are the key technological advancements happen in this WMS implementations. And, it is very important for the service providers to understand these advancements better to implement them for being the distinct providers in the market. 1. Cloud and Warehouse Management System – The benefits of cloud-based WMS is that they allow for fast deployment, no maintenance costs, and lower I.T. costs. A cloud-based WMS can be customized to meet the unique business needs and offers additional features such as higher data security protocols for businesses that will handle higher- value inventory. Both systems are tailored to fit with the various types and sizes of the businesses. While the Cloud WMS is more ideal for medium to large size businesses as well as those with the more complexities. Irrespective of the business size gets benefits greatly varied from a WMS that increases the business efficiency and also the productivity. 2. Industry‐specific blueprints — some vendors offer the industry‐specific templates that leverage the proven best practices and processes for specific industries. This is expected to cut down the implementation and deployment cycle, thus reducing the implementation time and cost. 3. Integration with the ERP system — ERP and WMS integration is an important factor to consider when the business model is complex to manage and require real-time system communications. It is crucial to achieve the liveliness to make effective business decisions, becomes more competitive, and simplify the data management process. 4. Configuration and Customization — the vendors are finding out the advantage of agile approach to work as needed so that the system can easily adapt and improving its performance. The ability to easily and rapidly configure and customize a solution, in a way, is a key required element for a WMS for any business.
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