Workplace justice

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Workplace Justice and the Design of Dispute Resolution Clauses

Workplace Justice and the Design of Dispute Resolution Clauses

Given that there has been so much written on the benefits of workplace consultation (for example Davis and Lansbury, 1996; Palmer and McGraw, 1996), it is surprising that few dispute resolution procedures actually provide for consultation within their operation. The dispute resolution clauses from 1000 federally registered enterprise agreements were examined by the author (Van Gramberg, 2001 PhD thesis, unpublished) to determine the extent of utilisation of participative mechanisms such as consultative committees, disputes committees and bargaining units. It was found that committee structures appeared in only 20 per cent of these formal procedures. Instead, most organisations ratify their enterprise agreements utilising standard hierarchical type processes (see ‘Dispute resolution procedures’ below). Further, the use of other internal mechanisms of dealing with disputes, such as an internal ombudsman or specialist contact officer was virtually non-existent. This means that the majority of organisations in Australia, may not be optimising their own internal capacity to resolve workplace disputes. This article aims to explore three consultative mechanisms: peer review, internal ombudsman and voluntary voice systems which operate to resolve workplace disputes internally according to the principles of workplace justice and in a cost effective manner.
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ADR and Workplace Justice: Just Settlement?

ADR and Workplace Justice: Just Settlement?

Finally, the issue of independence of ADR practitioners is one of concern in the workplace context. Recent survey analysis shows that leading the growth of ADR practitioners are those from management backgrounds, for instance former human resource managers (Van Gramberg 2001). Virtually none of them operate solely as workplace ADR practitioners. This means that they offer a broad range of managerial services including ADR. These practitioners may find it difficult to separate the roles of neutral ADR practitioner with that of management advocate. The fluidity of the roles played by ADR practitioners in the case studies led to the conduct of unrecognisable, hybrid ADR processes which arguably denied procedural and distributive justice to the disputants and demonstrated breaches of neutrality and impartiality by the ADR practitioner. Whilst training and accreditation solutions present themselves as being salient, another issue must also be addressed: Can workplace ADR effectively and ethically be conducted by management consultants who offer other management services?
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What Role Does Job Satisfaction Play on The Relationship Between Organizational Justice Perception And Organizational Citizenship Behavior? Empirical Evidence from Sri Lankan Employees

What Role Does Job Satisfaction Play on The Relationship Between Organizational Justice Perception And Organizational Citizenship Behavior? Empirical Evidence from Sri Lankan Employees

The existence of good relationship among employees and with others is depending on the justice perception. If employees perceive that they are treated fairly, they will naturally behave in a friendly and polite manner with conscientiousness toward colleagues and customers. Colquitt et al. (2001) state, that employees’ behaviors (e.g., OCB) are affected by organizational justice perceptions. Engagement in OCBs by employees has some preconditions (Williams & Zainuba, 2002). Aryee et al., (2002) state that one of these preconditions is workers’ perceptions of workplace justice. It is about the decision and practices being fair and these perceptions create trust among the workers. So then trusted employees are encouraged to engage in voluntary activities. Further, Rezaeian and Rahimi (2008) believe that, to encourage employee citizenship behaviors, managers should find their backgrounds, and then manage and improve them. One of such important background influencing citizenship behavior is perceived organizational justice. According to Asgari et al. (2008) when employees perceive justice practices they behave positively. Moorman (1991) emphasized that, organizational justice is regarding the organizational behaviors. Many studies found that perception of justice is correlated with OCB (e.g., Rauf, 2014). Therefore, it makes sense that justice perception has a positive relationship with OCB.
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Managing Neutrality and Impartiality in Workplace Conflict Resolution: The Dilemma of the HR Manager

Managing Neutrality and Impartiality in Workplace Conflict Resolution: The Dilemma of the HR Manager

We argue in this paper that the notion of neutrality is at odds with other roles of the HR manager which do not require neutrality. These roles envisage an allegiance either to the firm (strategic partner, administrative expert) or to the employees (employee champion). The growing shift in the HR role towards strategic partner predicts managerial behaviours aimed at benefiting the organisation over the employees as the norm. Despite these roles, the management of conflict remains a key HR function. This means that decision making to resolve workplace disputes is challenged by a conflict of interest inherent in the roles of the HR manager. Additionally, the emphasis on neutrality in most dispute resolution models is likely to lead to less intervention by the HR manager. This in turn, may lead to decisions which benefit the organisation over less powerful individuals. Whilst taking a neutral stance in conflict resolution may assist short-term goal attainment for the organisation, longer term benefits could be achieved through affording workplace justice. We argue that impartiality informed by an ethical code embedded with the principles of workplace justice may reconcile the conflict of interest in the HR managers’ role while assisting in delivering fairer dispute resolution outcomes.
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Workplace (in)justice, law and labour resistance in Vietnam

Workplace (in)justice, law and labour resistance in Vietnam

study by Trần suggests that the situation is different in Vietnam. In this case study, the court’s inaction following workers’ filing of lawsuits led the latter to lose patience, give up their fight and ultimately seek other means to make ends meet, 6 or to chase up their cases with no end in sight (Trần 2013: 279-280). These cases illustrate that law can contribute to workers’ resistance in varying ways, and is not always conducive to attaining justice for the workers. Another gap in the rights consciousness literature is that it pays scant attention to values other than those coming from state laws and legal institutions that might also inform individuals’ understandings of their rights and their claims-making. An examination of these values is especially important in post-socialist contexts like China and Vietnam, where, in addition to new legal institutions, values that were important in past socialist political ideology or in traditional society have continued to shape social views and behaviour. For instance, as Ching Kwan Lee (2007) has shown in her research, besides their engagement with the state’s legal rhetoric and institutions, laid-off workers’ and pensioners’ claims reflect moral values derived from socialist ideology and the socialist social contract. These workers justified their grievances by drawing on, for instance, Maoist rhetoric of socialism and the government’s promise about workers’ welfare and pensions (pp.71-78). As her discussion indicates, law in itself does not wholly account for individuals’ perceptions of their entitlements and rights. Therefore, it is important to examine other sets of values and understandings that may also contribute to those perceptions. Lee’s intricate analysis would benefit from more elaboration of the relationship between the above institutions and sets of values, that is, whether and how they complement, overlap, or contradict each other in the meaning-making of workplace justice.
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Immigrant Worker Health & Safety: A Guide Make the Road New York 2011

Immigrant Worker Health & Safety: A Guide Make the Road New York 2011

The organization’s more than 9,000 members – primarily low-income Latino immigrants – tackle the key issues facing their communities, including workplace justice, tenants’ rights, civil rights, public education, health care access, adult literacy, and workforce development. For more than 14 years, Make the Road has focused in particular on helping low-wage immigrant workers enforce their most basic rights on the job – from receiving the minimum wage and overtime to ensuring a healthy and safe work environment.

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What strategies do desk-based workers choose to reduce sitting time and how well do they work? Findings from a cluster randomised controlled trial

What strategies do desk-based workers choose to reduce sitting time and how well do they work? Findings from a cluster randomised controlled trial

An initial face-to-face consultation session with a health coach trained in motivational interviewing was provided to all intervention participants following baseline assess- ment. Health coaches were guided by a script, which in- cluded provision of relevant information and prompts to assist in achieving the intervention targets. The session commenced with feedback for participants on their sit- ting and activity levels from the baseline assessment and the extent to which they were already meeting the inter- vention targets. Coaches then guided them to identify the specific, individual-level behaviour change strategies they could use to achieve these intervention targets, re- flective of their personal preferences, job role and work environment. Participants were supported to identify and devise strategies which they considered to be poten- tially beneficial. A master list of possible strategies, in- cluding strategies identified by managerial staff as feasible for implementation in their workplace, were provided as examples where required. They were asked to identify two or three strategies for each of the ‘Stand
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The Effect of Organizational Justice Perception on Job Satisfaction of Health Employees

The Effect of Organizational Justice Perception on Job Satisfaction of Health Employees

Distributive justice shortly defines honestly share of outputs within the organization (Lambert et al., 2007). Distributive justice is related with honesty and fidelity shown during distribution of organizational resources. Distribution justice focus on wage increases, performance evaluations, promotions and punishments (Tutar 2007). Distributive justice compares gaining presented by the organization to the employees with their responsibilities within the organization, their level of expertise, effort and other contributions related with the work (Moorman, 1991). Individuals may perceive outputs as fair or unfair (income, bonus, promotion, social rights, etc.). They make comparisons between what they and others obtained. As a result, they may think that injustice is done towards them. This point of view may affect their attitudes and behaviors of these individuals may change with respect to their attitudes (Ozdevecioglu, 2003; Barsky and Kaplan, 2007). In other words, what is important in terms of distributive justice is the belief of employees with regard to the fairness of their share among the resources distributed.
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Moler Barber College. Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Plan. Moler Barber College

Moler Barber College. Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Plan. Moler Barber College

For the purpose of this statement, the site for performance of work done in connection with grants, and thus the drug-free workplace, consists of all locations where Moler Barber College does business. This includes, but is not limited to all lecture classrooms, parking lot, all administrative offices, storage rooms, and any space to be added in the future.

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Research into the psychological contract: Two
Australian perspectives

Research into the psychological contract: Two Australian perspectives

prevalent in the workplace. They also assume the individual is equipped to manage his or her own career with the confidence needed to take risks and to capitalize upon new career opportunities in a turbulent environment. These new perspectives thus give less weight than in traditional career trajectories to relational elements in the psychological contract (Donohue 2006). However, research suggests that for many workers continuity, predicability, job security, structure, and role clarity continue to have a significant association with the psychological contract (Atkinson 2002). Therefore, the opportunity to pursue a boundaryless, protean or portfolio career will not appeal to all workers (Guest & Mackenzie 1996). Nicholson and West (1998), in a study involving managers who changed career, found that, for the majority, transitions occurred as a result of external circumstances rather than through intended action. Moreover, while the experience of high skill/high demand contractors and specialists may involve diverse, challenging, and interesting assignments, the experience may well be very different for low skilled workers dealing with the uncertainty of
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An Effect Of Authentic Leadership As Moderator In Teachers’ Performance Appraisal Satisfaction

An Effect Of Authentic Leadership As Moderator In Teachers’ Performance Appraisal Satisfaction

interactional justice and performance appraisal satisfaction Based on the literature review of previous studies, there is a clear difference in result obtained between all dimensions of appraisal justice and performance appraisal satisfaction. This indicates that there are other variables that are expected to be moderate the relationship between appraisal justice and appraisal satisfaction. The variables that often influence teacher behavior in assessing performance are leadership [31],[32]. Principals are the top officials of teachers responsible for assessing the performance of all teachers under their supervision [33]. Principals are high-level executives who are often held accountable for the performance of their subordinate teachers. The principals leadership styles will form the basis for organizational performance [34]. Leadership is a process that influencing others to guide, build and show ways in group or organizational relationships [35]. There are various approaches to leadership style, but in performance appraisal, the most important is the leadership style that focused on employee confidence, transparency, trust and ethics [36]. Leadership styles that emphasize confidence, transparency, trust and sincerity are authentic leadership [37]. Furthermore, authentic leadership styles are more consistent with Asian culture [38]. Authentic Leadership is an ethical, integrity, trustworthy and high level of awareness leadership style [39]. Authentic leaders are generally leaders who are able to prove to others naturally that they understand their leadership style and are able to effectively lead others [40]. Authentic leadership consists of four dimensions which known as self- awareness (SA); relational transparency (RT); internalized moral perspective (IMP) and; balanced processing (BP). This study will see the ability of authentic leadership to act as a moderating variable in the relationship between appraisal justice and appraisal satisfaction. Thus, three hypotheses involving the role of authentic leadership as a moderating variable were developed as follows:
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Workplace learning, VET and vocational pedagogy: the transformation of practice

Workplace learning, VET and vocational pedagogy: the transformation of practice

This paper addresses a number of critical questions concerned with: workplace learning; vocational pedagogy, education and knowledge; and the transformation of practice. It draws upon discussions of vocationalism, vocational pedagogies as well as the constitution of vocational knowledge(s), debates which are set within particular historical and socio- economic as well as national contexts. In the European Union Initial Vocational Education and Training (i-VET) as well as Continuing Vocational Education and Training (c-VET) is seen as having a significant role to play in the development of social inclusion/cohesion (EU 2002, 2010; and see JVET, 2011). However, it is Important to acknowledge, as Sabates et al (2012, p233) remind us, that i- and c-VET are not all of a piece in Europe and will be accented differently on the basis of the particular context in which they are located. In a similar vein Mulder (2012) has discussed the way in which the terms used to describe VET are accented differently across societies and that there is no consistency in understandings of the terms. We need only think of the contrast between German and English responses to VET, with the former placing a significantly higher value on it than the later.
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Using workplace population statistics to understand retail store performance

Using workplace population statistics to understand retail store performance

The nature of these store catchments, which are predominantly non-residential, limit the volume of transactions on heavier, bulkier or perishable top-up shopping, driven by the high propensity for trade to originate on foot, with many consumers having lengthy commutes by public transport, which may not be conductive to transporting any more than essential grocery shopping. There may thus be limited opportunities to directly generate increased basket-sizes or additional revenue from these consumers due to the specific shopping mission and the nature of demand within these catchments. However, the high sales of specific niche lines such as champagne, at the Ludgate Circus store, suggests that careful consideration of store ranges and product lines at the store level is important in order to maximise sales opportunities. The very high proportion (84%) of WPZs in this store catchment G B is indicative of these types of purchases, with the group dominated by employees in elite managerial and professional roles (Cockings, Martin, and Harfoot 2015a). The strong late afternoon and evening transaction volumes of higher-value alcoholic beverages and ready meals at these stores represents a distinct shift from the morning and lunchtime bakery and deli sales. Maximising revenue from this combination of high-volume low-value lunchtime transactions and low-volume high-value evening transactions may present considerable opportunities. Flexible use of sales space and in-store ranging to prioritise bakery and deli lines during the morning and lunchtime period, followed by alcoholic beverages and ready meals in the late- afternoon and evening periods would maximise the fit with typical customer shopping missions. Furthermore, high volumes of affluent consumers utilising these Central London stores present considerable broader opportunities for retailers such as the Co-op to increase their brand presence, brand loyalty and market shares. The habitual nature of workplace (lunchtime) trade means that consumers may frequently visit the same stores in proximity to their workplace, yet may not routinely use other Co-op stores when shopping from home or elsewhere. Our analysis of interaction data
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Managing Creativity at Workplace: Ways to Foster it as an Integral Part of an Organization

Managing Creativity at Workplace: Ways to Foster it as an Integral Part of an Organization

We can observe a high level of correlation between what researchers suggest to foster creativity at the workplace and what industries do as a practice to ensure creativity driven work culture at the workplace. Not just the theory and practical implementation go hand in hand, but we also observe that many companies are working on similar lines to foster creativity at the workplace. Though the industry leaders in terms of innovation to differentiate themselves by some unique initiatives; but if we look from the bird‟s eye view, all industries which tend foster creativity and innovation at workplace tend to follow the same well-established theories. Some of the well-established methods to foster creativity at the workplace are as follows:
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Two Folded Layers of Organizational Justice

Two Folded Layers of Organizational Justice

Sarcastic situation encountered by the arrival new entrants in the organization; bundles of hurdles are waiting for them because of mock behaviour of the top management or immediate boss where they have to face the favoritisms while some of them will have to discrimination because of their social background. So these future architects become the victim of unfair system of the organization. Organizational adjustment lost its way of justice. While these mock leaders had to encourage new comer and train them accordingly their JDs, although they are from different societal back grounds (NIFADKAR, TSUI, & ASHFORTH, 2012). So it could be said easily that the top management/ manager could be productive exploitative on the hand (Burris, 1987).
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Volume 01  Issue 05: (2012) Sep.-Oct 2012

Volume 01 Issue 05: (2012) Sep.-Oct 2012

The purpose of the study was to identify the effect of perceived organizational justice on psychological wellbeing (life satisfaction) of police employees. The sample comprised of 200 police employees including constables, sub-inspectors and circle officers. The participants were chosen as purposive convenient sampling. The results obtained from Pearson r and Stepwise Multiple Regression Analyses suggest that perceived organizational justice has positive relationship with psychological wellbeing, leading to life satisfaction. Additionally, stepwise regression analysis indicates that the components of organizational justice (distributive Justice, procedural Justice and interactional Justice) are the strong predictors of the components of psychological wellbeing (autonomy, environmental mastery, personal growth, positive relationships with others, purpose in life and self-accepted).The findings support the nascent view that work is central to an individual’s life and perceived fairness in terms of distribution, procedure and interaction dramatically lead to employees’ psychological wellbeing (life satisfaction) which elicits contentment, fulfilment and to make an employee more competent to face the existential challenges of life. The study provides valuable implications for the police practioners, researchers and management body to better understand the psychological needs of police employees where they can experience themselves to be fulfilling and develop as global citizens with true human potentials at work and non-work domains of life.
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Organizational justice perception as predictor of job satisfaction and organization commitment

Organizational justice perception as predictor of job satisfaction and organization commitment

This study specifically concentrated on the relationship between organizational justice and job satisfaction and organizational commitment. As the previous discussion suggest, the job satisfaction among the employees at the healthcare sector is important to improve job quality and loyalty among their staffs. Job satisfaction and organizational commitment was also being given special focus into searching the answer to understand why some people are more satisfied with their job than others. There are two lines of research in this study, which are organizational justice and job satisfaction and organizational justice and organizational commitment. This study investigate the components of organizational justice on job satisfaction (Procedural, distributive and interactional justice) and this study investigate the components of organizational justice (procedural, distributive and interactional justice) on organization commitment.
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Dispositional antecedents and consequences of workplace ostracism: An empirical examination

Dispositional antecedents and consequences of workplace ostracism: An empirical examination

Our research makes several distinct contributions. First, drawing on victim precipitation theory, we built and empirically tested a conceptual model that links employee personality traits with workplace ostracism. Our results empirically demonstrated for the first time that personality traits of the target employees are important determinants of workplace ostracism. Specifically, consistent with Olweus’s (1978) typology of submissive and provocative victims, we proved that employees high in neuroticism and disagreeableness (indicators of provocativeness) and low in extraversion (as an indicator of submissiveness) are more likely to be the targets of workplace ostracism. Such results not only contribute to the workplace ostracism research by indicating some critical dispositional antecedents, but also provide additional evidence for the transportability of victim precipitation theory from criminology field to management field (Aquino, 2000; Aquino et al., 1999; Curtis, 1974; Elias, 1986). Second, going beyond previous correlation analysis of the relationship between workplace ostracism and employee job performance (Ferris et al., 2008), we applied the regression analysis and found that workplace ostracism is negatively related to employee job performance. Moreover, different from Ferris et al.’s (2008) single source and cross-sectional research design, we employed multi-wave, multi-source research design to test the relationship between workplace ostracism and job performance, thus providing more solid evidence of the causal relationship and alleviating the problem of common method variance (Podsakoff et al., 2003; Cook and Campbell, 1979).
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Veterans First Contracting Program Preference Hierarchy: Effect on Veteran-Owned Small Business

Veterans First Contracting Program Preference Hierarchy: Effect on Veteran-Owned Small Business

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) leaders created a Veterans First Contracting Program (VFCP) under Public Law 109-461 to provide procurement opportunities for veteran-owned small businesses (VOSBs) and service-disabled veteran-owned small businesses (SDVOSBs). However, DVA leaders established a preference hierarchy that increased opportunities for SDVOSBs and decreased opportunities for VOSBs. Research was lacking regarding the effects of the preference policy on VOSBs as a distinct small business category. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore and understand the experiences of 20 VOSB owners actively enrolled in the VFCP from Maryland, Virginia, and District of Columbia. Through the lens of distributive justice theory, this study examined the perceptions of VOSB owners about seeking access to VFCP procurement opportunities. These perceptions were examined within a framework of fairness. Qualitative data was collected through semistructured interviews resulting in coding and thematic analysis according to Moustakas modified van Kaam method. Findings uncovered 3 major themes: (a) VOSBs perceived a benefit to VFCP enrollment, (b) preference afforded SDVOSBs affects VOSBs motivation and VFCP competition structure (c) VOSBs perceived an unfair opportunity distribution between SDVOSBs and VOSBs. The study informs government leaders of the need to improve VOSB standing as a small business group. Implications for positive social change may be realized with a policy adjustment designed to strengthen VOSB access to federal procurement
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Workplace spirituality and employee work intentions : examining the relationship and the mediating role of ethical leadership.

Workplace spirituality and employee work intentions : examining the relationship and the mediating role of ethical leadership.

Since the 1990s, scholars and practitioners have discussed workplace spirituality with increasing interest, ushering in a major paradigm shift in organizational sciences and management theory (Ashmos & Duchon, 2000; Capra, 1996; Giacalone & Eylon, 2000; Giacalone & Jurkiewicz, 2003; Harman & Hormann, 1990; Ray, 1993; Stevens, 2008). This study adopted Ashmos and Duchon’s (2000) definition of workplace spirituality as the recognition that employees have an inner life that nourishes and is nourished by meaningful work, and that takes place in the context of their work community. The increased interest in the construct of workplace spirituality has been attributed to several emerging factors: (a) a desire by some organizations to nurture employees’ dedication to their work and connection to the workplace (Fry & Nisiewicz, 2013); (b) a shift from an industrial to an informational society that enabled organizations to decentralize and effectively reach stakeholders virtually anywhere in the world (Bowen, Ferris, & Kolodinsky, 2010); and (c) a rapid pace of change, competitive business environments, and disruptive organizational events which contributed to job insecurity, feelings of detachment, and a search for meaning at work (Moxley, 2000; Noer, 2009).
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