Writing and Mathematics Education

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THE ROLE AND ASSESSMENT OF TEXTBOOKS IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION

THE ROLE AND ASSESSMENT OF TEXTBOOKS IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION

Mathematical literacy resides in the skills of performing addition, subtraction, multiplica- tion and division by heart as well as in writing. It also includes the ability to use these operations to solve problems in everyday life. The emphasis is put on the solution strategy rather than on the result itself, on the realization of a given activity rather than on pupil’s (theoretical) knowledge. In case of Science, it concerns pieces of knowledge and methodologies that can be used to explain the phenomena in the world around us. Technology represents the applications of the knowledge as a means through which a person influences the surrounding where he/she lives.
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INNOVATION IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION

INNOVATION IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION

A common mistake that some mathematics teachers make when assessing student performance is believing that if a student can “do” a problem, then the student “understands” math. Most mathematics students (and some teachers) seem to interpret the students‟ role as essentially acquiring (i.e., memorizing) facts and algorithms that can be immediately applied to the solution of given exercises; few students expect mathematics to be meaningful and fewer still see mathematics as a creative undertaking. Consequently, students are too often content with externally manipulating symbols and doing routine problems, without ever reaching a deep and personal understanding of the material. Inquiry based mathematics incorporates writing in mathematics which highlights this misconception and provides a natural teaching opportunity for developing students‟ mathematical reasoning skills.
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Strategies for the Use of Mathematics Textbooks for Primary and Secondary Schools under the Background of “Internet+”

Strategies for the Use of Mathematics Textbooks for Primary and Secondary Schools under the Background of “Internet+”

The rapid development of information technology and the popularity of the In- ternet have brought a wealth of educational and teaching resources. Teachers can share or access high-quality educational and teaching resources anytime and anywhere on the Internet. And students can also get access to educational and teaching resources online as well as learn anytime and anywhere. However, this does not mean that the value of mathematics textbooks is weakened. On the contrary, the mathematics textbooks of primary and middle schools are still the basic elements of teaching, the main basis of teaching, the main materials of learning, the carrier of the functions of mathematics education, which plays an irreplaceable role in elementary education. If mathematics teachers pay attention to mathematics textbooks, understand the writing intentions of the mathematics textbooks, deeply excavate the educational and teaching value of mathematics textbooks, grasp the mathematics textbooks as a whole, use mathematics text- books creatively, and pay attention to the comparative study and use of different versions of mathematics textbooks, it will give full play to the educational and teaching functions of mathematics textbooks.
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Does Writing Have Any Effect on Mathematics Success?

Does Writing Have Any Effect on Mathematics Success?

The skills that are developed in math programs have different levels of importance within themselves. One of these important skills is the ability to establish communication. Math programs encourage students to establish communication using mathematical knowledge. One of skill is the action of writing. According to Atasoy (2005), mathematical communication increased in the classroom by writing, which also helps students from positive attitudes towards mathematics and writing in general. Writing is one of the actions related to self-organizing skills (Albert, 2000; Graham & Harris, 2000), which is fundamental in mathematics education. Note-taking is one of the most common study activities in school settings (Lahtinen, Lonka, & Lindblom-Ylanne, 1997). Writing is also one of the fundamental means of communication between teachers and students in mathematics education. Since writing has an important role in mathematics education, mathematics should be part of the curriculum (NCTM, 1989). According to Countryman (1992), mathematics is one of the ways to understand the world, and writing is one of the ways to understand mathematics. Writing enables a higher rate of retention in our memories and helps us to understand mathematical concepts, and even enhances learning in certain conditions (Kobayashi, 2005). It is important to ensure that students express themselves with the notes they take during classes and activities, since writing is also a key way to share mathematical ideas with others.
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Profiles of Canadian Postsecondary Education Dropouts

Profiles of Canadian Postsecondary Education Dropouts

cohort of Canadian youth who were both 22 years old and not in high school in December 2003. By December 2005, 76% attended postsecondary education, of those 12% had graduated and 12% had dropped out. According to Seidman (1996), Tinto’s (1993) theory of student departure is “[w]idely examined, tested and accepted by the educational community” (p. 18). This study will employ and build upon this theory. According to Guiffrida (2006), “Tinto’s (1993) theory of student departure is the most widely cited theory for explaining the student departure process and has reached ‘near paradigmic status’ in the field of higher education” (p. 451). Tinto posits that individual pre-postsecondary education attributes (individual disposition, family background, academic skill and ability, and secondary schooling quality) form individual commitments for postsecondary education. The key disposition is the individual’s intention to go to postsecondary education (clear educational and occupational goals and consideration of potential career options prior to postsecondary education). Other dispositions include commitment to meet educational and occupational goals and preparation to comply with academic and social expectations of postsecondary education.
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Emergence of a discipline - mathematics education towards an explanation of transition in mathematics curriculum

Emergence of a discipline - mathematics education towards an explanation of transition in mathematics curriculum

Ironically, as one of the arguments introduced into the debate by Education Department representatives was the need to reduce the pressure of examinations on the students, the outcome [r]

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Some lessons in mathematics: a comparison of mathematics teaching in Japan and America

Some lessons in mathematics: a comparison of mathematics teaching in Japan and America

The classroom study demonstrates what takes place in typical Year 9 mathematics classrooms in Japan, in contrast to typical U.S. classrooms. Differences between the working lives of mathematics teachers are highlighted by other components of the TIMSS study. The question we need to address now is what can we learn from this evidence in order to improve the situation in the UK. One problem is that without such comprehensive data on what happens in U.K. mathematics classrooms we are forced to rely on evidence from Ofsted inspections. Such inspections suggest that only about a third of mathematics lessons at Key Stage 3 can be considered, in Ofsted terms, to be good or very good [5,6,7,8] by providing , for example, opportunities to "investigate and solve problems" and develop "conceptual understanding" [5, page 21]. In the approximately one-third of mathematics lessons where Ofsted claim that classroom practice is poor, contributory factors are listed as including "knowledge taught in isolation, lacking appropriate contexts" with "little attempt to foster any understanding of underlying concepts" [6, page 25]. Such evidence appears to indicate that U.K. mathematics classrooms are likely to be much closer in style to U.S. classrooms than to Japanese ones.
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Improving mathematics and science education in rural Australia: A practice report

Improving mathematics and science education in rural Australia: A practice report

Lyons and Quinn (2010), based on a national Australian survey of 3,759 year 10 students, identify three factors at the upper secondary level of education that contribute to the declining enrolments in senior school science: students have difficulty in picturing themselves as scientists; a perception of a decrease in the value of science relative to its difficulty, and a failure of school science to engage a wide range of students due to the nature of delivery. They also concluded that the challenges facing secondary STEM education are not likely to result from a decline in the level of interest in science among younger students, nor on negative experiences of science at the primary school level, with 92 per cent of the participants indicating that it was the early secondary school science experiences that influenced the decision on whether to study science at year 11 level. In a review of the literature, Tytler (2007) describes this lack of influence of primary school experiences of science on subsequent decisions to study science and identifies the primary to secondary school transition as a point where interest in studying science appears to decline sharply.
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Academic writing as identity-work in higher education:  Forming a ‘professional writing in higher education habitus’

Academic writing as identity-work in higher education: Forming a ‘professional writing in higher education habitus’

As an example of how such an internalised framework can develop through the auspices of a ‘writing in higher education habitus’ one can consider how undergraduate writing for education purposes is inevitably framed and informed by the (often tacit) requirements of the discipline, which exert a primary regulatory function on their writing. However, and somewhat paradoxically, despite the disciplinary-congruent expectations which inform many undergraduate assessments, students are often told that they should be developing their own ‘academic voice’ (Lillis and Thomas 2001). This kind of contradiction persists throughout any professional academic’s career, whether it be writing a doctoral thesis or responding to the request for revisions for a peer-reviewed journal. In this way, I argue that individuals, at any stage in academia never chose to write in a particular way for academic purposes, rather their academic writing can be seen as arising out of a ‘professional writing in higher education habitus’, which itself is a:
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The Construction of Identity in Secondary Mathematics Education

The Construction of Identity in Secondary Mathematics Education

It is our contention that any explanation of what happens in mathematics classrooms will be incomplete if it ignores the essentially social nature of schooling. The students who are learning mathematics in secondary schools are also trying to negotiate conflicting constraints in developing their identities as sons or daughters, as males or females, as members of various friendship groups and of course, as learners. Most students want to be successful at school, not least to avoid conflict with parents, but they also need to negotiate a way of being successful that does not alienate them from groups with whom they feel affinity. In some cases, the playing out of these social process will lead students towards particular individuals or groups, while in others, it will be influenced by a desire not to be like an individual or a group. The extracts from interviews described above, and the many more that we could have selected, show clearly that mathematics classrooms in the United States and the United Kingdom present to the apprentice an unambiguous vision of what it means to be successful at mathematics, and of what it means to be a mathematician. However, it is also clear that this vision is one with which many, if not most, students find it hard or impossible to identify. They want to be successful at mathematics (so that they can get on to the next phase of education, or into a job they want), they may even like some parts of the mathematics they do, but they don’t want to be successful as mathematicians. ‘Becoming a mathematician’ seems to play no part in their plans. From a psychological perspective this might well be cast as a problem of the ‘ability’ of the students. However, we believe that more useful insights into the nature of mathematics education, particularly of the ‘able’ students who are qualified to study mathematics further but choose not to do so, would be gained by looking at this as an issue not of ‘ability’ but of ‘belonging’.
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Reliability and Validity of the Instrument Measuring Values in Mathematics Classrooms

Reliability and Validity of the Instrument Measuring Values in Mathematics Classrooms

Several prominent researchers have attempted to develop tools which could measure values in mathematics education and mathematics as a subject such as: Mathematics Values Instrument (Bishop, 1988), Mathematics Values Scale (Durmus & Bicak, 2006), and Mathematics Education Values Questionnaire (Dede, 2011). Bishop, Clarke, Corrigan and Gunstone (2005) designed an instrument to learn more on teachers’ preferences and practices regarding values in teaching mathematics and sciences. On the other hand, the Teachers’ Beliefs Survey (Beswick, 2005a) touched on measure teachers’ consistency with a problem-solving view of mathematics and corresponding views of mathematics teaching and learning. The Mathematics Values Inventory (MVI) focused on mathematics values in terms of the achievement-related choices which focus on students’ beliefs in the area of interest, general utility, need for high achievement, and personal cost (Luttrell, Callen, Allen, Wood, Deeds, & Richard, 2010). Other instruments were instruments developed by Durmus and Bicak (2006) and Dede (2006 & 2009) from Turkey which categorized the values of mathematics and mathematics education into teachers and students centered values.Currently there were only two research in Malaysia, one is on teachers’ understanding, perceptions and beliefs on mathematics values (Wan Zah, Sharifah Kartini, Habsah, Ramlah, Mat Rofa, Mohd Majid, and Rohani, 2005) and mathematics secondary school teachers’ beliefs and their instructional practices Wan Zah, Sharifah Kartini, Mat Rofa, Habsah, Rohani,Ramlah, and Mohd Majid, (2009).
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Diary Keeping in Writing Education

Diary Keeping in Writing Education

The themes that emerged in the interviews regarding the diaries kept by the participants were related to the daily problems, personal development, and writing skills. Participants described that diary keeping has been meaningful as they shared a lot of things that cannot be told to others, sharing a connection with oneself in a comfortable and reliable environment, chatting with it as a friend, writing a secret onto it, diary as a secret friend, reminder of the past, putting the person's past into a chronological order, and so on. As the participants have noted into their diaries, the most important problems they have experienced were the inability to find something new to write because their days were very ordinary and the fear of being read by others. Similar to what Johnson (2006) has described, in this research diaries also made it possible for the person to self-observe and improve their relationship with themselves. Under the personal development theme, just as in the diary expressions such as relieving a person, being like a therapist, knowing oneself and making corrections for the future, developing a stable posture, making feel like one have an idea, and making someone better express themselves were used. According to Hiemstra (2001), diary benefits include personal development, intuition and self-expression, problem-solving, stress reduction, health benefits, reflection, and critical thinking.
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On Second Atom-Bond Connectivity Index

On Second Atom-Bond Connectivity Index

Dong, On atom–bond connectivity index of connected graphs, Technical Report M 2010-04, Mathematics and Mathematics Education National Institute of Education. Xing, On atom–bond[r]

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Mathematical Modelling Approach in Mathematics Education

Mathematical Modelling Approach in Mathematics Education

Mathematical modelling (a bi-directional process between daily life and mathematics) has become one of the most discussed and widely known topics in mathematics teaching in recent years. However, less than desired level of interest is shown to modeling topic throughout the world. The main reason for this is that it is hard for students and teachers because of the gap between the educational objectives and school practices (Lesh and Doerr 2003a). In fact, mathematics is a discipline whose teaching and learning is considered to be difficult. This difficulty results from the complex nature of mathematics. Another reason for that is to do with the "external meaning" of the mathematical thinking. For example, what does "half of something" mean? For this reason, it is important to relate mathematics with events and applications in our environment. However, it is not that simple to do this. An important part of mathematics is formed of rules and discovered systems that are self-consistent. Value system of the numbers is an example for that. Children conduct activities regarding the qualities of systems and relations of number during the preschool period. Later, they learn how they will manipulate algebraic expressions. Thus, they reach reality, which is the next step. Mathematical terms may have many different meanings. For example, a fraction can be interpreted as a part of a whole, a ratio between two quantities or division of one number to another. This corresponds to a decimal number, fraction or percentage forms [26].
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Investigating Mathematics Teachers’ Awareness in the Use of Modeling in Mathematics Education

Investigating Mathematics Teachers’ Awareness in the Use of Modeling in Mathematics Education

Abstract: This study investigated the use of modeling by mathematics teachers in their teaching of mathematics. In the specific objectives, it sought the mathematics teachers’ awareness in the use of modeling in mathematics education as well as the level of utilization. The study was conducted in Kolokuma/Opokuma local government area of Bayelsa state in Nigeria. It adopted a survey research design with a population of 47 mathematics teachers in ten secondary schools. A sample of 20 out of this population was used. To arrive at this, purposive sampling technique was used. Instrument for data collection was Modeling Awareness Inventory (MAI) which was validated by experts. The instrument was trial tested using Cronbach Alpha formula and had a reliability coefficient of 0.86. Descriptive statistic was used to answer all the research questions asked. It was found among others that Majority of the mathematics teachers in Kolokuma/Opokuma local government area are not aware of modeling in mathematics education. Suggestions on how to improve their awareness were also made.
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Online education for Ontario's registered nurses: An examination of critical thinking.

Online education for Ontario's registered nurses: An examination of critical thinking.

An interesting observation related to assignment design was offered by a post-RN nurse in one o f the interviews. This nurse suggested that more case studies might have been a way o f encouraging critical thinking skills in the course. While some studies claim that critical thinking skill is not related to gender (Baxter-Magolda, 1992; Claytor, 1997), others have found a relationship between gender and critical thinking based on the idea that women have different ways o f knowing than men (Belenky, Clinchy, Goldberger & Taurule, 1986; Miller, Finley & McKinley, 1990; Rudd et al., 2000; Walsh, 1996; Wilson, 1989). Therefore, in a learning setting where critical thinking skill is valued, the issue o f gender may also need to be considered. For instance, it has been suggested that, because women are more culturally socialized to build and maintain relationships through co-operation, they tend to apply critical thinking in scenario- and case-based learning situations and activities that draw on personal and clinical experiences (Lundy et al., 2002). Extrapolating, in learning situations such as nursing education where the majority of participants are female, attention may need to be paid by content experts and learning designers to preparing these kinds o f learning activities.
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Vol 17, No 12 (2018)

Vol 17, No 12 (2018)

Five of the articles quantitatively examined student learning by measuring changes in the students’ grades or test results. All of these studies had something positive to say about students’ learning mathematics after the test periods with programming. Even if the test results did not show any improvements in some of the cases, each study reported positive improvements for some groups. Moreno-León et al. (2016) found the use of Scratch to have accelerated the mathematics learning of the experimental group; however, the effect was larger for social studies. Lindh and Holgersson (2007) and Hussain et al. (2006) were based on the same study and data. It was found that the Lego Mindstorms robot activities were possibly useful for some groups; however, there was no overall effect. While the fifth-grade students’ mathematics results improved after the Lego training, there were no changes for the ninth-grade students and no noticeable improvements in problem-solving skills in either the fifth- or ninth-grade students. The teacher in Ardito et al. (2014) found that the students showed improvements in some mathematical topics, such as area and circumference, the quantitative data did not support these findings when comparisons were made across the whole state. However, other data indicated that the students had better results in problem solving and logical thinking. Khasawneh (2009) compared student mathematics achievements with student Logo programming achievements. A positive but low correlation was found in seventh-grade students.
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Mathematics education policy enactment in England’s Further Education Colleges

Mathematics education policy enactment in England’s Further Education Colleges

Our examples of policy enactment span a period of almost 10 years and take place under different governments with distinctive policy agendas. Despite contrasting approaches to education and changing policies, the importance of mathematics within vocational education has increased but the effect on students’ mathematical attainment remains negligible. Although more post-16 students are studying mathematics in England, many fail to make any significant learning gains (Department for Education 2016) and the impact is reminiscent of the outcomes of the government’s Skills for Life Strategy, which attempted and failed to improve levels of adult numeracy. A closer examination of the reasons for mathematics policy ‘failure’ in Further Education seems to be an obvious step towards a deeper understanding of the processes involved, the obstacles to be overcome and the likely routes to successful policy implementation in the future. Our examples provide a starting point but further examination of the
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The challenge to write: dangerous and disruptive words

The challenge to write: dangerous and disruptive words

 26. Thinking like a young writer… • To the student, the areas which I had highlighted for her did not seem incorrect and my explanations were sometimes too complicated for her. Even young children love writing poetry and enjoying the sound of the poems they have created being read aloud. (Melanie Harris) • When writing my own poem I had prepared many drafts and picked them apart, practicing how to write. That was a light bulb moment for me. For Lisa to write her poem describing how she feels and thinks about roses…first we looked at different objects with a magnifying glass. I asked Lisa to consider what else could the object be? What did it remind her of? What could you use a rose for if you were an insect? What does it feel like? (Natalie
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Contra g#ψ - Continuous Functions and almost Contra g#ψ – Continuous Functions in Topological Spaces

Contra g#ψ - Continuous Functions and almost Contra g#ψ – Continuous Functions in Topological Spaces

M.Sc Mathematics, Avinashilingam Institute for Home Science and Higher Education for Women University, Coimbatore, Tamilnadu, India2. Department of Mathematics, Avinashilingam Institu[r]

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